Out-of-warranty repairs for iPhone 6 runs up to $299, iPhone 6 Plus up to $399

Posted:
in iPhone edited October 2014
Apple on Friday updated its repairs webpage to reflect current pricing for the iPhone models released today, revealing out-of-warranty fixes could cost up to $299 for the iPhone 6 and up to $329 for the 6 Plus.




As seen in the image above, Apple is quoting out-of-warranty iPhone 6 and 6 Plus repairs at a respective $30 and $60 above iPhone 5s/5c/5 pricing, which currently stands at $269.

While the gratis Apple One Year Limited Warranty applies to all new purchases, the protection plan does not cover accidental breakage, meaning the cost to customers without additional AppleCare+ may equate to a new subsidized iPhone 6, depending on storage capacity and model.

With the $99 AppleCare+ extended warranty, owners are covered for two years and are allowed two accidental damage repairs, minus a set $79 service fee for each.

Interestingly, Apple's price for fixing accidental screen damage runs only $109 for the new iPhone 6, while the iPhone 6 Plus is lumped in with the iPhone 5s/5c/5 at $129, plus $6.95 shipping fee.

Finally, Apple notes out-of-warranty battery replacement for all iPhone models, including the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, comes in at $79, plus shipping.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 46
    What a load of BS
  • Reply 2 of 46

    Interesting that a screen replacement is only $109. However, if you spend $99 for AppleCare, you still have to pay $79 for a deductible for accidental damage Twice. 

     

    So, if you didn't buy AppleCare and broke your screen twice, it would cost you $218.  If you bought AppleCare, your total repair cost would be $257. Total cost is MORE.  Sure, AppleCare covers other damage as well, but broken screens are the most common scenario.

  • Reply 3 of 46
    Interesting that a screen replacement is only $109. However, if you spend $99 for AppleCare, you still have to pay $79 for a deductible for accidental damage Twice. 

    So, if you didn't buy AppleCare and broke your screen twice, it would cost you $218.  If you bought AppleCare, your total repair cost would be $257. Total cost is MORE.  Sure, AppleCare covers other damage as well, but broken screens are the most common scenario.

    You're better off going with best buy's protection. Seems like. Either $10 or $15 a month I think and no service fee. They give you a loaner phone to use as well. At least, this is what they used to do. I haven't had to use it so I cancelled mine. I can change my own screens for $50 - $80 once the phone is about a year old. Screen prices go down after about a year.
  • Reply 4 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by no25 View Post



    What a load of BS



    totally right. Screw them. If you don't have Apple Care you should just have to go buy a full price retail phone. Same if you break it. You didn't take care of your stuff so that $649+ is a suitable punishment. 

  • Reply 5 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Brian Jojade View Post

     

    Interesting that a screen replacement is only $109. 


     

    I'm curious about the source of that information. Its not on the screen shot after all. I can't help wondering if that is a typo and it should be $199. Which would make sense give that the 5 series is $149 and one would expect the same or higher. 

  • Reply 6 of 46
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,350member

    Better off not buying AppleCare and using a third-party Apple Authorized repair service to do the work.

     

    Also, use a good credit card for the initial purchase. The no-fee American Express Blue card provides 90 day purchase protection coverage, including accidental damage not covered by the manufacturer's warranty and theft. That means if you drop your iPhone and shatter the screen two weeks after buying it, AMEX will cover it.

     

    The same AMEX card extends the manufacturer's standard warranty by a year (covers manufacturing defects, not accidental damage).

     

    Whatever you do, don't buy expensive electronics with debit cards. There are few benefits to using a debit card. If you can afford something on a debit card, you can afford it on credit card; just pay the latter off in full and carry no balance.

  • Reply 7 of 46
    mpantone wrote: »
    Better off not buying AppleCare and using a third-party Apple Authorized repair service to do the work.

    Also, use a good credit card for the initial purchase. The no-fee American Express Blue card provides 90 day purchase protection coverage, including accidental damage not covered by the manufacturer's warranty and theft. That means if you drop your iPhone and shatter the screen two weeks after buying it, AMEX will cover it.

    The same AMEX card extends the manufacturer's standard warranty by a year (covers manufacturing defects, not accidental damage).

    Whatever you do, don't buy expensive electronics with debit cards. There are few benefits to using a debit card. If you can afford something on a debit card, you can afford it on credit card; just pay the latter off in full and carry no balance.

    Well that logic is airtight. Unfortunately, AMEX KNOWS you won't pay off your credit card in full upon purchasing the phone. You know what pays for that broken screen during the 90 days you mentioned? Penalties. Interest.

    Nah.
  • Reply 8 of 46
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,350member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rmb0037 View Post



    Well that logic is airtight. Unfortunately, AMEX KNOWS you won't pay off your credit card in full upon purchasing the phone. You know what pays for that broken screen during the 90 days you mentioned? Penalties. Interest.



    Nah.



    You are wrong.

     

    I haven't carried a credit card balance for twenty years, nor have I made a late payment. Something like half of credit card users carry no balance over. That means that the half that are paying interest and penalties are paying for bennies that responsible cardholders enjoy.

     

    There is no penalty to pay off your balance due in full.

     

    The scary statistic is that the average consumer has thousands of dollars of credit card debt. For every person that has a zero dollar balance, there is a person with thousands and thousands of consumer debt.

     

    Just know which side of the fence you are sitting on.

     

    Again, anyone who can purchase a phone on a debit card can afford doing so with a credit card. Remember that most of the world does not purchase subsidized handsets and revolving credit card debt is not typical of many consumers outside of the United States.

     

    Use credit cards for convenience, not for credit.

  • Reply 9 of 46
    mpantone wrote: »

    You are wrong.

    I haven't carried a credit card balance for twenty years, nor have I made a late payment. Something like half of credit card users carry no balance over. That means that the half that are paying interest and penalties are paying for bennies that responsible cardholders enjoy.

    The scary statistic is that the average consumer has thousands of dollars of credit card debt. For every person that has a zero dollar balance, there is a person with thousands and thousands of consumer debt.

    Just know which side of the fence you are sitting on.

    Again, anyone who can purchase a phone on a debit card can afford doing so with a credit card. Remember that most of the world does not purchase subsidized handsets and revolving credit card debt is not typical of many consumers outside of the United States.

    Use credit cards for convenience, not for credit.

    That's great that YOU haven't. But there are 48% of Americans that do. And you are exactly right. As of March 2012, the average American holds $15,257 of CREDIT CARD debt. That's not including mortgage. Id rather pay cash for the purchase than ride on a service that feeds off of others' inability to pay off a credit card to buy something they didn't want to impress someone they don't like with money they don't have.
  • Reply 10 of 46

    Again, if you can pay for something with a debit card, you can make the same purchase on a credit card.

     

    The problem is when people who can't afford something on a debit card (cash) start paying for things with credit.

     

    There are times when I couldn't afford certain things. Heck, there are things I still can't afford. That's fine. I DON'T BUY THEM.

     

    If you want to build up a cash reserve for emergencies, stop buying daily $4 espresso drinks at Starschmucks. Cancel your cable TV. That's probably $2,000 per year between the two.

     

    Note that credit card debt is much less prevalent in other countries, even industrialized ones where people have good discretionary cash. That really indicates that a certain percentage of Americans simply don't understand basic math.

     

    The amusing tie-in to this discussion is that smartphones typically are not subsidized in most countries. That means people are shelling out $700-1000 for an iPhone and paying for monthly service that is relatively inexpensive.

     

    No one is pointing a gun at my head telling me to buy something with my credit cards.

     

    The only debt you really want to have is a home mortgage since you can write off the interest. With low interest rates, it's still cheaper to use someone else's money to buy a house than using your own cash. That is not the case with consumer credit cards.

  • Reply 11 of 46
    mpantone wrote: »
    Again, if you can pay for something with a debit card, you can make the same purchase on a credit card.

    The problem is when people who can't afford something on a debit card start paying for things with credit.

    There are times when I couldn't afford certain things. Heck, there are things I still can't afford. That's fine. I DON'T BUY THEM.

    Note that credit card debt is much less prevalent in other countries, even industrialized ones where people have good discretionary cash. That really indicates that a certain percentage of Americans simply don't understand basic math.

    The amusing tie-in to this discussion is that smartphones typically are not subsidized in most countries. That means people are shelling out $700-1000 for an iPhone and paying for monthly service that is relatively inexpensive.

    No one is pointing a gun at my head telling me to buy something with my credit cards.

    And I 100% agree. The subsidy is paid for through the phone plan and, while a grey area, I don't argue with it. Id rather have it the other way around though since I may not want to upgrade my phone every two years.

    Just be careful with the "whatever you do..." line on the Internet. I respect opinions but that steps too close to the "this is fact" side of the fence.
  • Reply 12 of 46

    error:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    While the gratis Apple One Year Limited Warranty applies to all new purchases, the protection plan does not cover accidental breakage, 

    The AppleCare Protection Plan (additional $99) covers accidental damage.

    The standard 1 year warranty (which is not a protection plan) does not cover accidental damage.

  • Reply 13 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rmb0037 View Post



    And I 100% agree. The subsidy is paid for through the phone plan and, while a grey area, I don't argue with it. Id rather have it the other way around though since I may not want to upgrade my phone every two years.

    What's stopping you? The choice is yours.

     

    I buy unsubsidized iPhones directly from Apple.com. I've used prepaid SIMs from AT&T GoPhone, StraightTalk, T-Mobile, and Truphone in these devices over the past few years.

     

    Currently I am using the $30/month T-Mobile Monthly4G prepaid service that gives me 100 voice minutes/unlimited text/5GB 4G data in my iPhone 5s.

     

    I see nothing inherently wrong with paying for a carrier-subsidized handset, as long as you have done the math and it works for your usage pattern. 

     

    I can upgrade (or not) at any given time, I just need to do the math to figure out what it'll cost me. There's no penalty.

     

    Notably, by buying unsubsidized factory-unlocked phones, I can travel internationally very easily since the handset is unlocked and I can shove a local carrier's SIM into the device. This is another thumbs-down for subsidized phones at least from a personal level. If you don't travel internationally, it's not a big deal.

  • Reply 14 of 46
    mpantone wrote: »
    What's stopping you? The choice is yours.

    I buy unsubsidized iPhones directly from Apple.com. I've used prepaid SIMs from AT&T GoPhone, StraightTalk, T-Mobile, and Truphone in these devices.

    Currently I am using the $30/month T-Mobile Monthly4G prepaid service that gives me 100 voice minutes/unlimited text/5GB 4G data.

    I see nothing inherently wrong with paying for a carrier-subsidized handset, as long as you have done the math and it works for your usage pattern. 

    I can upgrade (or not) at any given time, I just need to do the math to figure out what it'll cost me. There's no penalty.

    Notably, by buying unsubsidized factory-unlocked phones, I can travel internationally very easily since the handset is unlocked and I can shove a local carrier's SIM into the device. This is another thumbs-down for subsidized phones at least from a personal level. If you don't travel internationally, it's not a big deal.

    That's not a bad idea. I haven't done enough research to warrant going off contract but this makes sense.
  • Reply 15 of 46
    Originally Posted by no25 View Post

    What a load of BS

     

    In what capacity?

  • Reply 16 of 46
    Don't tell me that you believe it actually costs that much to fix stuff
  • Reply 17 of 46
    In what capacity?
    Don't tell me that you believe it actually costs that much to fix stuff
  • Reply 18 of 46
    Originally Posted by no25 View Post

    Don't tell me that you believe it actually costs that much to fix stuff

     

    It’s not for you to decide. Either pay to fix it, pay full price for a new one, or enjoy your broken device. What right do you have to dictate how much Apple makes on repairs? If it costs too much, people will stop buying the phone. THEY’RE NOT STOPPING.

  • Reply 19 of 46
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by no25 View Post



    Don't tell me that you believe it actually costs that much to fix stuff

     

    Yeah cause they're totally going to fix a iPhone that got dropped in a toilet or run over by a car. $300 for an iPhone 6 is close to the direct costs of an iPhone plus the costs of doing the swap.

  • Reply 20 of 46

    I approve of this new rate hike. 

     

    I believe in personal responsibility. I also believe that people must be prepared to deal with the consequences of the choices that they make.

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