Horsepower of Apple's A8 & iPhone 6 extend iOS's gaming lead over Android's Google Play

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  • Reply 101 of 121
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Samsung may be including more RAM because of inefficiencies in the OS. Apple has, from the start, worked hard to keep the iDevices lean and mean. I remember when computers needed only MBs of RAM, then RAM became cheap and programs became bloated until today it's a RAM & resource-hungry monster.

    Absolutely, Samsung not only includes an obscene amount of unwanted software, the system is also bulging at the seems as TouchWiz is literally the worst Android distro out there today. A unmolested version of Android 4.4 should take up no more then 380mb of system memory, at least that is what a Nexus device uses. The Samsung Tab S though takes up a whopping 1.2GB of system memory before a single app is even opened. In trying to add more features that Samsung thinks will help them sell more phones has resulted in complete and utter failure. It's so bad that they should honestly be ashamed of themselves. The Tab S actually uses some pretty nice hardware and should easily feel faster then say a 2 year old Nexus 10, however it's simply not the case as the Nexus is virtually lag free and the Tab s feels as if it's using a 3 year old processor, the lag is just incredibly bad. No one likes Samsung's magazine look, no one,every reviewer has bad mouthed it, every forum visiting Android lover has the same sentiment, why then does Samsung continue to use it. Their not Apple, Apple doesn't allow their users to select a default browser, email client, etc. inexcusable as far as I'm concerned but they can get away with it because they have so many other great things going for them. Samsung doesn't, their failing hard and fast, so when their customers have a problem with something, they best damn well change it or their going to loose the little faithful they have, real quick.
  • Reply 102 of 121
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    relic wrote: »
    ^ post

    I think Apple really has this 'DNA thing' going for them, but apart from that, why don't competitors, like Samsung, hire the same talented people Apple hires? When RIM had to let go of many employees at their HQ the big 3 were hiring away; why wasn't Samsung there? How come we all can see the shortcomings in Samsung products but they don't address them the way we discuss here? Could that be some cultural thing I'm not aware of?
  • Reply 103 of 121
    philboogie wrote: »
    I think Apple really has this 'DNA thing' going for them, but apart from that, why don't competitors, like Samsung, hire the same talented people Apple hires? When RIM had to let go of many employees at their HQ the big 3 were hiring away; why wasn't Samsung there? How come we all can see the shortcomings in Samsung products but they don't address them the way we discuss here? Could that be some cultural thing I'm not aware of?

    Who says they are not hiring talented people? I am sure they do. Like Microsoft, RIM and others. Talent is not such much when strategy and management is lacking.
  • Reply 104 of 121
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    ^ post

    Talent as in engineering, as in management, as in CEO, CFO, CTO. Why is it they can't do things 'right'? Selling the most smartphones doesn't make Samsung's products the best products. Heck, selling the most does't even make you the most popular manufacturer. Just ask Microsoft.
  • Reply 105 of 121
    philboogie wrote: »
    relic wrote: »
    ^ post

    I think Apple really has this 'DNA thing' going for them, but apart from that, why don't competitors, like Samsung, hire the same talented people Apple hires? When RIM had to let go of many employees at their HQ the big 3 were hiring away; why wasn't Samsung there? How come we all can see the shortcomings in Samsung products but they don't address them the way we discuss here? Could that be some cultural thing I'm not aware of?

    Samsung management really sucks and if good employees are mis-managed you won't get their best work. Look at microsoft, for 10 years they had the smartest and brightest engineers and software designers all under Uncle Fester's thumb - and all that brain power didn't do more then see MS tread water all that time.

    Another thing Apple is very good at is long term strategy which they execute under the cloak of secrecy. By the time Apple gets ready to reveal their new product they have as much as years worth of lead on the wanna-be competitors. THEN they keep up the innovation pressure in such a way the competitor is always a step or two behind.

    Finally, Apple plays the PR game exceptionally well. They get plenty of free air and ink while doing some of the best advertising spots I've seen.
  • Reply 106 of 121
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    ^ post

    Excellent points. Apple is really doing the whole thing on their own, and execute extremely well. I think I'm just baffled at other companies not 'doing it the same way'. Don't they have the same incentive to at least strive for perfection? Try not to only have a great product, but create an ecosystem around it. Do the advertising well. Their website. The lot.

    Why can does only Apple do it all 'right'? Or at least have this eye for detail, and strive to make the best product, and everything that comes with it. (though I'm sure there are other companies doing their thing extremely well, but I'm narrowing it down to tech companies here).
  • Reply 107 of 121
    philboogie wrote: »
    Talent as in engineering, as in management, as in CEO, CFO, CTO. Why is it they can't do things 'right'? Selling the most smartphones doesn't make Samsung's products the best products. Heck, selling the most does't even make you the most popular manufacturer. Just ask Microsoft.

    I think it's a few key reasons that take the difference.

    1. Run the company in a way that departments integrate and understand each other. Don't e.g. have one dept design a motherboard and hand this blob over to the "packaging guys" to make a box around. But consider design continuously throughout all aspects and stages of the product development.

    2. Don't let the company be run by accountants. But by people with vision. And have the balls to take decisions without having finance generating a study of six month how the ROI might look like. Sometimes just go for it. So kind of controlled risk. But take them once in a while.

    3. Have a flat hierarchy and strong leaderships at the top enabling fast decisions without numerous layers inbetween watering down the decision and dragging it out.

    4. Have people at the helm that know the products. That is, they have a sufficiently deep understanding of the stuff they are selling/accounting/marketing/etc.

    5. Focus. As opposed to throw all and see what sticks.

    6. Don't think in terms of specs or what CAN be done but how to use tech to create a value add for the customer. Best examples to me are touchID on the "good" end and the FirePhone's geeky stuff on the other end.

    IMHO you will find that Apple appears to be doing well at those points. Others not so much.

    Edit: fixed some typos.
  • Reply 108 of 121
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,435member
    ^ post

    +7
  • Reply 109 of 121
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post





    I think it's a few key reasons that take the difference.



    1. Run the company in a way that departments integrate and understand each other. Don't e.g. have one dept design a motherboard and hand this blob over to the "packaging guys" to make a box around. But consider design continuously throughout all aspects and stages of the product development.



    2. Don't let the company be run by accountants. But by people with vision. And have the balls to take decisions without having finance generating a study of six month how the ROI might look like. Sometimes just go for it. So kind of controlled risk. But take them once in a while.



    3. Have a flat hierarchy and strong leaderships at the top enabling fast decisions without numerous layers inbetween watering down the decision and dragging it out.



    4. Have people at the helm that know the products. That is, they have a sufficiently deep understanding of the stuff they are selling/accounting/marketing/etc.



    5. Focus. As opposed to throw all and see what sticks.



    6. Don't think in terms of specs or what CAN be done but how to use tech to create a value add for the customer. Best examples to me are touchID on the "good" end and the FirePhone's geeky stuff on the other end.



    IMHO you will find that Apple appears to be doing well at those points. Others not so much.

    Those are all excellent points. I would say 1 and 4 have possibly gone down a bit since Steve departed. 1 since Steve used to have the company organised in to product tiger teams e.g. "mac team" "iphone team", which ensures the kind of interaction you're talking about, but Tim has since reorganised it in to more traditional groupings such as "software" "hardware" "design".

     

    And 4 because Tim's true love seems to be human rights issues more so than products. Not that there's anything wrong with that. But there used to be stories about e.g. Steve going in to shops and picking up all the cameras and saying "We could make a better one of these," but I've never heard any stories like that about Tim, more he likes to use is position as a bully pulpit to talk about issues in society.

     

    But the rest of the numbers sure apply. Well, 5 (focus) they still definitely have that in hardware but are losing it a bit in software. They seem to be making more and more kits lately, Homekit, Carkit, Healthkit, Apple Pay - that is a somewhat scattergun approach hoping to have an API ready if any of these markets take off. Apple Pay looks like a good one, but the others are more shots in dark being taken too early imho.

  • Reply 110 of 121
    Regarding their push into various directions such as HealthKit, HomeKit etc I am really curious how this will play out. I might be wrong, but I have oGe impression that Steve was far more aggressive and prepared the launch of such products better. I first got the impression when the revamp of the AppleTV started to drag out as apparently negotiations with the various cable providers did not come to a successful closure. Then CarKit still leaves me with some kind of slow adoption and interest from the OEMs. Yes. Different times, different products, partners etc. But the overall impression sticks with me for now.
    I like what you wrote about Steve walking around and looking at cameras and Tim certainly gives a much more politically correct impression. There are pros and cons to this of course. I just don't believe that the best and ground breaking decisions/inventions were made by a large group of people but rather by few very dedicated and convincing/powerful persons.
    It is a bit like the key ites now and then and the inpression Steve gave you as opposed to the group of people hosted by Tim. I feel this reflected in what they have come up with since the change.
    And maybe a bit OT: today was the first time I had the chance to take an iPhone 6 in my hands. The first thing I felt was that it was light and nice. But then I felt that this phone somehow lost its "iPhone-ness" (like Alice lost her "muchness") and it was just like any other phone with the exception of running iOS. maybe I am putting too much into this considering that at some point an iPhone is an iPhone is an iPhone and realistically it's about every ten years you can expect a breakthrough device. Smile.
  • Reply 111 of 121
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Regarding their push into various directions such as HealthKit, HomeKit etc I am really curious how this will play out. I might be wrong, but I have oGe impression that Steve was far more aggressive and prepared the launch of such products better. I first got the impression when the revamp of the AppleTV started to drag out as apparently negotiations with the various cable providers did not come to a successful closure. Then CarKit still leaves me with some kind of slow adoption and interest from the OEMs. Yes. Different times, different products, partners etc. But the overall impression sticks with me for now.
    I like what you wrote about Steve walking around and looking at cameras and Tim certainly gives a much more politically correct impression. There are pros and cons to this of course. I just don't believe that the best and ground breaking decisions/inventions were made by a large group of people but rather by few very dedicated and convincing/powerful persons.
    It is a bit like the key ites now and then and the inpression Steve gave you as opposed to the group of people hosted by Tim. I feel this reflected in what they have come up with since the change.
    And maybe a bit OT: today was the first time I had the chance to take an iPhone 6 in my hands. The first thing I felt was that it was light and nice. But then I felt that this phone somehow lost its "iPhone-ness" (like Alice lost her "muchness") and it was just like any other phone with the exception of running iOS. maybe I am putting too much into this considering that at some point an iPhone is an iPhone is an iPhone and realistically it's about every ten years you can expect a breakthrough device. Smile.

    Homekit is a good start but it is nothing without the accompanying products and a company to back it up. At the end of the day you still need a talented company to tie everything together, as without one, well, you have nothing. When we built our house we went with the B&O system, it's great but not because of the system itself but becuse B&O tied everything together for us with expert electricians and IT folks, Apple doesn't offer this service, it is up to you to find the engineers to make it happen, which I can tell you first hand, sucks. Ever dealt with construction company's, yea, sucks, another thing Apple's system isn't compatible with a lot of hardware, the UI is really nice though, just didn't support what we wanted to use with it, that support list is greeting bigger though. I suggest finding a good company first that does home automation and then just use the system they suggest, most of the time they still use iPads to control everything just not Apple software. We have iPad Minis mounted in the walls of almost every room, they just use the BEOLink app.
  • Reply 112 of 121
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post



    Regarding their push into various directions such as HealthKit, HomeKit etc I am really curious how this will play out. I might be wrong, but I have oGe impression that Steve was far more aggressive and prepared the launch of such products better. I first got the impression when the revamp of the AppleTV started to drag out as apparently negotiations with the various cable providers did not come to a successful closure. Then CarKit still leaves me with some kind of slow adoption and interest from the OEMs. Yes. Different times, different products, partners etc. But the overall impression sticks with me for now.

    I like what you wrote about Steve walking around and looking at cameras and Tim certainly gives a much more politically correct impression. There are pros and cons to this of course. I just don't believe that the best and ground breaking decisions/inventions were made by a large group of people but rather by few very dedicated and convincing/powerful persons.

    It is a bit like the key ites now and then and the inpression Steve gave you as opposed to the group of people hosted by Tim. I feel this reflected in what they have come up with since the change.

    And maybe a bit OT: today was the first time I had the chance to take an iPhone 6 in my hands. The first thing I felt was that it was light and nice. But then I felt that this phone somehow lost its "iPhone-ness" (like Alice lost her "muchness") and it was just like any other phone with the exception of running iOS. maybe I am putting too much into this considering that at some point an iPhone is an iPhone is an iPhone and realistically it's about every ten years you can expect a breakthrough device. Smile.




    Homekit is a good start but it is nothing without the accompanying products and a company to back it up. At the end of the day you still need a talented company to tie everything together, as without one, well, you have nothing. When we built our house we went with the B&O system, it's great but not because of the system itself but becuse B&O tied everything together for us with expert electricians and IT folks, Apple doesn't offer this service, it is up to you to find the engineers to make it happen, which I can tell you first hand, sucks. Ever dealt with construction company's, yea, sucks, another thing Apple's system isn't compatible with a lot of hardware, the UI is really nice though, just didn't support what we wanted to use with it, that support list is greeting bigger though. I suggest finding a good company first that does home automation and then just use the system they suggest, most of the time they still use iPads to control everything just not Apple software. We have iPad Minis mounted in the walls of almost every room, they just use the BEOLink app.

     

     

    I have my 22 year-old B&O linked up to my iMac using a simple cable (albeit an expensive one). Lovely sound.

  • Reply 113 of 121
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post



    Regarding their push into various directions such as HealthKit, HomeKit etc I am really curious how this will play out. I might be wrong, but I have oGe impression that Steve was far more aggressive and prepared the launch of such products better. I first got the impression when the revamp of the AppleTV started to drag out as apparently negotiations with the various cable providers did not come to a successful closure. Then CarKit still leaves me with some kind of slow adoption and interest from the OEMs. Yes. Different times, different products, partners etc. But the overall impression sticks with me for now.

    I like what you wrote about Steve walking around and looking at cameras and Tim certainly gives a much more politically correct impression. There are pros and cons to this of course. I just don't believe that the best and ground breaking decisions/inventions were made by a large group of people but rather by few very dedicated and convincing/powerful persons.

    It is a bit like the key ites now and then and the inpression Steve gave you as opposed to the group of people hosted by Tim. I feel this reflected in what they have come up with since the change.

    And maybe a bit OT: today was the first time I had the chance to take an iPhone 6 in my hands. The first thing I felt was that it was light and nice. But then I felt that this phone somehow lost its "iPhone-ness" (like Alice lost her "muchness") and it was just like any other phone with the exception of running iOS. maybe I am putting too much into this considering that at some point an iPhone is an iPhone is an iPhone and realistically it's about every ten years you can expect a breakthrough device. Smile.

     

     

    I feel similar to you about the iPhone 6. I saw it today for the first time. Nice and light, yes, but somehow a bit cheap and tacky feeling. And I really hate the protruding camera lens. It doesn't have the style and gleaming finish of the 5.

  • Reply 114 of 121
    marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member

    IT IS A PHONE NOT A HUMAN BEING.You make a big deal about this while in the world more essential facts are happening like WARS AND Ebola spreading!

  • Reply 115 of 121
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

     

    IT IS A PHONE NOT A HUMAN BEING.You make a big deal about this while in the world more essential facts are happening like WARS AND Ebola spreading!




    Yes, you are correct. However, since there is not much I can do to either (wars, ebola and all the other news around), should this prohibit us from talking about a phone and what we like/dislike about it?

     

    Also, "essential" is a rather subjective and relative term, is it not? For some, the most essential question is how to eat today; for others it might be how to pay a bill; and for others again how to deal with the fact that a close person just died. I do not judge either. Since the "practical range" of my actions is quite limited as to world peace, hunger etc. I prefer to contribute where I can, but I honestly do not feel that NOT talking about the iPhone is helping anyone in need of medication or peace. Just to make this clear: I am not being sarcastic here, I try to be realistic.

  • Reply 116 of 121
    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

    IT IS A PHONE NOT A HUMAN BEING.You make a big deal about this while in the world more essential facts are happening like WARS AND Ebola spreading!



    Pro tip: you can be outraged about more than one thing at a time.

     

    Regarding ebola, just don’t go anywhere it has been. Wars will always happen. There will never be a united planet because it didn’t begin to happen at the one time it would have worked.

  • Reply 117 of 121
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

     

    IT IS A PHONE NOT A HUMAN BEING.You make a big deal about this while in the world more essential facts are happening like WARS AND Ebola spreading!


    Cheer up mate. Yes, Ebola is nasty, but there are cures being worked on, and it is spread by contact, it is not airborne, so it is not likely to become a worldwide epidemic. And yes, war sucks. But the choice we face right now (presuming you're talking about Iraq and Syria) is not between peace and war. Peace is not on the table. It's a choice between extremists massacaring civilians, or our armies massacaring the extremists. So from that point of view, even the war that's happening over there now is the best of a bad situation. So have fun geeking out on tech and don't feel guilty about it.

  • Reply 118 of 121
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,010member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

     

    IT IS A PHONE NOT A HUMAN BEING.You make a big deal about this while in the world more essential facts are happening like WARS AND Ebola spreading!




    This thread is about Horsepower not Horsemen.  Though we'd love to cure disease and war it's only so we can feel clever, the result would ultimately bore us and they'd be back again.  Time to take a closer look in the mirror.

  • Reply 119 of 121
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ascii View Post

     

    Peace is not on the table. It's a choice between extremists massacaring civilians, or our armies massacaring the extremists.


     

    Such naivety is quite breathtaking. And depressing.

  • Reply 120 of 121
    Originally Posted by KiltedGreen View Post

    ...naivety...

     

    The irony physically hurts. 

     

    Fine, you go talk to the Islamic State. I’m sure they’ll be fine with not following the rules set by the foundation of their existence¡

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