Apple's Mac mini receives long-awaited update with 4th-gen Intel CPUs, price cut to $499

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  • Reply 61 of 169
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Trubador View Post

     

    I've been waiting a LOOONG time for this MacMini update so that I can trash my non-upgradeable and monitor-failing PowerPC iMac stuck on Tiger. The entry-level new MacMini is a joke. But the mid-tier model is right where I needed it to be. Two questions:

     

    1) The obvious one that everyone is asking, is the RAM soldered or is it user-upgradeable? And if it IS user-upgradeable, are you able to order it with ONE 8gb memory stick rather than two 4gb sticks (that way you only have to buy one additional 8gb stick, and not have to lose the 4gb in order to buy and install two 8gb sticks on your own)? I've seen pricing of 16gb (2x8) for $160-$190. Given that Apple wants to charge $200 for an 8gb bump is obviously not cost-efficient. But if it IS soldered, then I would have to have Apple bump it to 16gb.

     

    2) What is the performance difference between the 1tb HD and the 1tb Fusion drive? Is it worth the extra $200 to upgrade to that Fusion drive even though it's the same memory capacity?

     

    Once I know the answers to these questions I'll be buying one ASAP.


  • Reply 62 of 169

    It's definitely soldered memory because the word "Upgradeable" has been removed from the tech specs.  Now it says "Configurable" to 16GB.

     

    Atleast they kept the SATA drive option around so it means you can upgrade the 1TB SATA drive to SSD cheaper than their $800 option.

  • Reply 63 of 169
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,474member

    Take all the upgrades and it hits $3,543.00

     

  • Reply 64 of 169
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

     

    I wonder how this new Mac Mini benchmarks compared to the old one, especially since the dual core CPUs seem to be a bit weak, purely going by the specs, but I don't know much about them to be honest.

     

    And it's interesting that there is no longer any quad core option. Maybe Apple is positioning the Mac Mini as purely an entry level Mac, and no more.


    For majority of apps, single-core performance > multi-core.  Some apps will leverage multi-core better so the new Mac Mini may not be a good Datacenter development box anymore.   There are many companies that use mac minis to run server based apps and they need Quad-core.

  • Reply 65 of 169
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Vision33r View Post

     

    It's definitely soldered memory because the word "Upgradeable" has been removed from the tech specs.  Now it says "Configurable" to 16GB.

     

    Atleast they kept the SATA drive option around so it means you can upgrade the 1TB SATA drive to SSD cheaper than their $800 option.




    Both Mac Pro and 27" iMac both say Configurable as well and those are user installable chips.

  • Reply 66 of 169
    Are these actually going to be any quicker? They've dropped the quad core i7 as the maximum processor back to a dual core i7? (Obviously dependent upon what you're doing with them, but seems a step back).
  • Reply 67 of 169

    I have a 2009 mac mini with 2,26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo and a Nvidia Geforce 9400 256 MB graphiccard and 8 GB RAM.

     

    Will the new middle-version of the mini be considerably faster?

     

    The entry-version with 1,4 Ghz and 4 GB non-upgradeable RAM is really not an option for anyone.

     

    Interesting is also is that the firewire port is gone, so one needs to buy a thunderbolt-to-firewire-adapter as well if one uses a firewire-hd like I do.

  • Reply 68 of 169
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,742member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by John.B View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by John.B View Post



    Woohoo! New Haswell minis! Driving to the Apple store now!

     

    Bah!!!  "1-3 days" or "ship to store".   I thought these were available today?


     

    Confirmed, no new Mac minis at the Apple store today.  Likewise for the Retina iMacs.

  • Reply 69 of 169
    Still need a new Apple monitor to go with it. I can't help it, I love my office to scream Apple.
  • Reply 70 of 169
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lemon Bon Bon. View Post

     

    Wonder if it will drive a 4k display...

     

    Lemon Bon Bon.


     

    The i5-4278U (4288U) with the HD5100 that drives the new Mini is perfectly capable of pushing 4K displays.  The refresh rate/Hz will depend on the connection type available.  If it has HDMI 2.0, it can push 60Hz, otherwise 24-30Hz.  Not sure about Thunderbolt.

  • Reply 71 of 169
    pfisherpfisher Posts: 758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

     



    Not a 1.4 GHz. The Acer C720 Chromebook sells for $199 with a 1.4 GHz chip. Hook one up to an external screen using it's HDMI port, buy an external 1 TB Toshiba drive for $65 and just use the USB 3 port with a USB hub and boom you've got  an equivalent machine for $300 without buying a keyboard or mouse. When you want to travel just unplug your C720 and take it with you. Bring the external drive if it will be needed.

     

    I didn't see the Apple presentation today. When I heard about the Mini being priced lower I was excited. Then I went to the Apple site and saw the specifications of the $499 model. What a let down. At $350 I would get interested in having a Mini with those specifications.




    Is it exactly the same chip? What about external drive specs and buses and all of that biz? Then you can't run OS X - for better or worse.

     

    Just asking as we have a Chromebook (the old 720) as getting the C720 sounds like a good idea for the average person.

     

    Depends on what you want to do with your computer...

  • Reply 72 of 169

    Not even an option for a second drive?

  • Reply 73 of 169
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 15,360moderator
    nathanimal wrote: »
    Also, looks like Mac Mini server has been discontinued... can't find it anywhere.

    They're all servers, you just buy OS X Server from the App Store.

    The CPUs are definitely slower than the quads, the 2013 i7 Air gets 2.89 in Cinebench and this chip is 15-25% faster so say 3.6. The old quad-core gets about 6.8.

    Iris 5100 (not Iris Pro remember) is double the HD 4000 though. Iris Pro is about 50-100% faster.

    The chips are lower power at 28W so likely less fan noise than the old quads.

    It's nice to see PCIe SSD. I expect soldered RAM too and this isn't a problem as their RAM prices are ok and allow 16GB.

    The way they introduced the update made it clear what the Mini is - someone's first Mac. If you need the power, you get the iMac or 15" MBP and you'll get double the CPU/GPU performance.

    This here for $1109 is the cheapest quad-i7 and has a dedicated GPU:

    http://store.apple.com/us/product/FD103LL/A/refurbished-154-inch-macBook-Pro-23ghz-Quad-core-Intel-i7

    With a 512GB SSD and 16GB RAM, it's about $1400. That's not the Retina one though.
  • Reply 74 of 169

    Crap. I waited too long to get me a mini server. Just i5 dual core doesn't interest me at all.

    So, a bog standard old PC running some *nix will have to do. *sigh*

  • Reply 75 of 169
    eggyeggy Posts: 1member
    Apple..... What have you done? Mac Mini downgrade from quad core i7 3rd gen to dual core 4th gen? Blech. Your are joking.... Right?
  • Reply 76 of 169
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,086member

    Question: the new MacMini has Two Thunderbolt 2 ports. The Apple Thunderbolt display hasn't been refreshed to a Thunderbolt 2 display. What's the difference? And I thought Thunderbolt was daisy chainable, so why do you need 2 ports on the mini?

  • Reply 77 of 169
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 216member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by eightzero View Post

     

    Question: the new MacMini has Two Thunderbolt 2 ports. The Apple Thunderbolt display hasn't been refreshed to a Thunderbolt 2 display. What's the difference? And I thought Thunderbolt was daisy chainable, so why do you need 2 ports on the mini?




    You need two ports because some Thunderbolt devices have only one port, and need to go at the end of the chain.  Apple's Firewire adapter is one example.

  • Reply 78 of 169
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

     



    To be fair, that's a celeron processor at 1.4Ghz not an i5, relying on USB 3 and external drives is not industrial strength, not to mention that ChromeOS is not remotely  up to Yosemite standards - so not really equivalent at all. But your point that it is no bargain probably still stands.


    I should have added that I would install Linux as a dual boot with Chrome OS. One button switching is possible with Chrome OS. 

     

    Apple really doesn't have an entry level model. They have an entry level into Apple but not into computing. Their Minis have always been priced high for what they give buyers. There are too many alternatives out there now for Apple to expect the Mini to bring in new business. Probably the people buying Minis are already Apple users who want a companion machine for another room in their homes. 

     

    The EVGA Note 7 tablet and the Nvidia Shield tablet are new Android machines capable of doing real work. For $179 the Note 7 has a very fast processor for video and has a video output. With the right program it could do what a Mini does. Nobody needs a fast processor to do spreadsheets or word processing. 

     

    These devices can do anything on the web that a Mini can do. For work purposes they just need the right program. In time such will be written. If they want to use Microsux 360 on the web they can do that right now. 

     

    To me it looks like Apple is still treating their computer line as second class citizens. They are now a phone and tablet manufacturer with computers as their side business. 

  • Reply 79 of 169
    However, I am said that they took away the server option, with redundant storage, bundled OS X Server, and most importantly, server support under AppleCare :-(
  • Reply 80 of 169
    chiachia Posts: 713member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

     



    Not a 1.4 GHz. The Acer C720 Chromebook sells for $199 with a 1.4 GHz chip. Hook one up to an external screen using it's HDMI port, buy an external 1 TB Toshiba drive for $65 and just use the USB 3 port with a USB hub and boom you've got  an equivalent machine for $300.


     

    Comparing the Acer C720 Chromebook, with its 1.4GHz Celeron processor to the new Mac Mini with its 1.4GHz Haswell i5 is equivalent to comparing

     

    this electric car:



    to this Abrams tank:

     

    and concluding the electric car must be just as good as they both have a similar top speed.

     

    See what the Abrams is doing to the Mustang?  Well just imagine the Mac Mini tank mauling the electric car Chromebook underneath.

    Oh the humanity!

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