Opinion: Touch ID improves iPad security at cost of Smart Cover unlock convenience

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  • Reply 101 of 129
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,881member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Guti2068 View Post





    Nope. The problem is he being lazy and complaining for something that Is not a problem. Either way no matter where you use the iPad it should be password protected. Touch ID or not.

    Seems like you're imposing a view of how someone else should use their technology in their own home.  No dice.

  • Reply 102 of 129
    crowley wrote: »
    Seems like you're imposing a view of how someone else should use their technology in their own home.  No dice.

    Doesn't matter. The complain it's not valid. Touch ID it's actually faster. Either way it should be lock.
  • Reply 103 of 129
    The author is so right. Reaching out and touching a button is such a terrible inconvenience. Rates right up there with the hassle of moving my hand up to my mouth to feed myself.
  • Reply 104 of 129
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,881member
    guti2068 wrote: »
    Doesn't matter. The complain it's not valid. Touch ID it's actually faster. Either way it should be lock.
    Faster than no lock? You're wrong there.
  • Reply 105 of 129
    crowley wrote: »
    Faster than no lock? You're wrong there.

    Faster than password. Something everyone must have turn ON.

    Does not matter where you use your device. A password must be set.

    He is not smart for not having a password on his old iPad.
  • Reply 106 of 129
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,881member
    You don't seem to have grasped the meaning of "must".
  • Reply 107 of 129
    plovellplovell Posts: 818member

    I agree with the suggestion in the article - the combination of Smart Cover and Touch ID doesn't work so well.

     

    The good news is that Apple is good at sorting out issues such as this (which is why they have the location-based security patent).

     

    Personally, while at home I am content with having my iPad not require a passcode to unlock. Of course, Touch ID is required for purchases etc. Away from home, I want  the passcode to be required to unlock it.

  • Reply 108 of 129
    Thank you Neil for pointing out Apple's poor design choice. The limitation of the current Touch ID preferences can't be fully understood until you realize the convenience of flipping open the smart-cover is removed.
  • Reply 109 of 129

    Seriously? We finally get device security using top-notch fingerprint recognition technology so we no longer need to type a password, and you're COMPLAINING?  Why don't you just go back to your Android?

     

    Not to mention all my iPad apps (1Password, Amazon, Mint, Evernote, Dropbox, etc) that also use Touch ID.  My life got so much easier.  So I don't get what all the whining is about.

  • Reply 110 of 129
    If Touch ID bothers you so much, don't use it. Problem solved.
  • Reply 111 of 129
    If Touch ID bothers you so much, don't use it. Problem solved.
    He said he uses it for the other advantages and hopes apple to offer an alternative to an all or none setup.
  • Reply 112 of 129
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,154member
    TouchID hates one of my thumbs, and I had to reprogram one of my index fingers after it stopped accepting it completely. It works, but easily fails to read if my fingers are cold, moist, oily, too hot, or water-logged (like after a shower). So basically, there's a fifty-fifty chance I have to go through the "try again, try again, try again, fail" dance. Not spectacular.

    Yeah I get that too. It seems a fairly small imperfection completely messes up recognition.

    guti2068 wrote: »
    Doesn't matter. The complain it's not valid. Touch ID it's actually faster. Either way it should be lock.

    It's only faster if it works first time, otherwise the repeated touch-let go-touch-let go is slower than a passcode.
  • Reply 113 of 129
    elijahg wrote: »
    Yeah I get that too. It seems a fairly small imperfection completely messes up recognition.
    It's only faster if it works first time, otherwise the repeated touch-let go-touch-let go is slower than a passcode.

    Work 100% percent of times for me.

    I read a tip. Add the same finger twice. You can add up to 10.
  • Reply 114 of 129
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    IMO this is as bizarre as people who complained about Apple ditching the physical mute switch on the new iPad Air. Especially considering Apple added a dedicated switch in control center. It takes me one or two seconds tops to turn mute switch on and off. Complete non-issue.



    only if you used the mute switch for muting. i used it for its original feature -- rotation lock. since i read w/ my iPad in a multitude of different places and positions, i found this feature very useful to set in an instant via a hardware switch, based on my movement. sure it works to use the tray, but it's not as nice as a switch and a decrease of value, even if a small one. 

  • Reply 115 of 129
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jackzig1984 View Post



    If placing your thumb (or finger) on the Home button is too much trouble just leave the iPad unlocked, no password required. Of course if you chose to do that don't complain when someone hacks your device.



    There are things in this world to complain about, there are things about the iOS to complain about, but putting your thumb on the Home button isn't one of them.



    you're ignoring the use case suggested by others here -- iPad in the living room for family use. if you use Touch ID, either 1) no one else can use it when you're not around, or 2) your other family members get access to your iTunes account and are able to make purchases. neither of those matches the desired use case -- unlocked iPad for general use, Touch ID for the usual purchasing authentication. 

  • Reply 116 of 129
    hillstoneshillstones Posts: 1,490member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post



    Very good article. Another annoyance worth pointing out is the top versus side on/off button on the iPad versus the iPhone. This would not have -- I can't believe I am actually about to say this (but I guess there's always a first time) -- happened under Steve.

    Give me a break...enough of this bullshit "wouldn't happen under Steve".  Steve Jobs thought the hockey-puck mouse from the original iMac was the best mouse in the world....said no one else ever!  Jobs himself has come up with some great Apple blunders, so people should stop assuming he was perfect.

  • Reply 117 of 129
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,881member
    Would be quite refreshing to see a list of all the things Steve Jobs got wrong here.
  • Reply 118 of 129
    hillstones wrote: »
    Very good article. Another annoyance worth pointing out is the top versus side on/off button on the iPad versus the iPhone. This would not have -- I can't believe I am actually about to say this (but I guess there's always a first time) -- happened under Steve.
    Give me a break...enough of this bullshit "wouldn't happen under Steve".  Steve Jobs thought the hockey-puck mouse from the original iMac was the best mouse in the world....said no one else ever!  Jobs himself has come up with some great Apple blunders, so people should stop assuming he was perfect.

    He's right, though.

    I'm pretty certain that Jobs wouldn't have authorised the on/off button to the side. It's a design flaw.
  • Reply 119 of 129
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,881member

    Howso?  Being more easily accessible doesn't equate to a design flaw in most common understandings.

  • Reply 120 of 129
    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

    Howso?  Being more easily accessible doesn't equate to a design flaw in most common understandings.



    It’s no more accessible and conflicts with the volume buttons.

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