Apple releases third beta of OS X 10.10.2 with focuses on Wi-Fi, Mail & VoiceOver

Posted:
in macOS edited December 2014
Apple on Friday supplied developers with a third beta of OS X 10.10.2, a forthcoming maintenance and security update for its Yosemite operating system for Mac, with indications that it may address lingering Wi-Fi issues.




OS X 10.10.2 build "14C81f" is now available to developers on the Mac App Store or through Apple's Dev Center website. Testers have been asked to focus on Wi-Fi, Mail, and VoiceOver when sampling the pre-release software.

The second beta of OS X 10.10.2, identified as 14C78c, shipped to developers last week and also asked them to focus on changes made to Wi-Fi assets. The first beta arrived two weeks before that.

Apple last OS X 10.10.1 update arrived in November to fix Wi-Fi issues, Mail compatibility and general bugs. Despite the updated code, some Mac users continued to see slow Wi-Fi speeds.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Would be great to see Photos released before the holidays, but everything I've seen shows sometime next year.

    Having said that, anything with wifi fixes is appreciated.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Apple on Friday supplied developers with a third beta of OS X 10.10.2 ...

     

    And it won't be the last beta.  When my iMac restarted it went straight to the Desktop.  The completion progress dialog was still there and it said "5 minutes remaining."  It didn't ask me for my password until the progress indicator finished, at which point it presented the login / password view as expected.

     

    Other than that it seems fine.

  • Reply 3 of 14
    sockrolid wrote: »
    And it won't be the last beta.  When my iMac restarted it went straight to the Desktop.  The completion progress dialog was still there and it said "5 minutes remaining."  It didn't ask me for my password until the progress indicator finished, at which point it presented the login / password view as expected.

    Other than that it seems fine.

    1) I don't understand how, of all companies, Apple can't even get a decent ballpark of how long installations will take. I understand with Windows, but Apple should be able to be able to calculate something better than "5 minutes remaining" with more than the half the progress bar remaining when it finishes up, especially with their limited HW choices. This doesn't seem insurmountable and I feel like they did better at this many years ago.

    2) That auto-logging in with an update has been standard for at least Yosemite and perhaps even Mavericks. Since you have to use a password to initiate the install it carries over. I'm not sure how it does that with a restart in place or if that's safe, but I don't think it's a glitch.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    solipsismy wrote: »
    1) I don't understand how, of all companies, Apple can't even get a decent ballpark of how long installations will take. I understand with Windows, but Apple should be able to be able to calculate something better than "5 minutes remaining" with more than the half the progress bar remaining when it finishes up, especially with their limited HW choices. This doesn't seem insurmountable and I feel like they did better at this many years ago.

    2) That auto-logging in with an update has been standard for at least Yosemite and perhaps even Mavericks. Since you have to use a password to initiate the install it carries over. I'm not sure how it does that with a restart in place or if that's safe, but I don't think it's a glitch.

    So you want Apple to fully index your files, run a diff and from an internal database find a closest comparison to tell you how long to expect the update to then take?

    What does it gain Apple to do this?
  • Reply 5 of 14
    eluardeluard Posts: 319member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post





    So you want Apple to fully index your files, run a diff and from an internal database find a closest comparison to tell you how long to expect the update to then take?



    What does it gain Apple to do this?



    They can surely get a better ball-park figure. And it would be better to overestimate the expected time than drastically underestimate it as they do. For the initial Yosemite install it was halted at 2 mins for quite a while. In fact for so long that I thought that something had gone wrong. Fortunately I didn't panic, I just let it sit there…

     

    all day…

     

    and then all night.

     

    Next day it had completed the install. 



    Now that was a long two minutes.

  • Reply 6 of 14
    So you want Apple to fully index your files, run a diff and from an internal database find a closest comparison to tell you how long to expect the update to then take?

    What does it gain Apple to do this?

    1) Why does it need to index all your files for point update that changing specific files or a restore to a clean drive?

    2) They already index my entire drive with Spotlight so I they need that data (which I don't think they do) to figure out how long an update should take with my CPU, RAM, and drive performance.
  • Reply 7 of 14

    I'm disappointed that there's no mention of Bluetooth here. My Magic Mouse has been a real chose to connect since the Yosemite upgrade. If the mouse is not turned on when the Mac boots, it can be impossible to get the Mac to recognise it (turn mouse on and off, turn bluetooth on and off, repreatedly hit 'connect', shout at it, nothing works reliably). Needless to say, it was all fine under Mavericks :embarrass

     

    Anyone got any good advice? And if anyone is suffering the problem, sometimes starting Bluetooth Explorer will cause 'connect' to work but it's not a certainty.

  • Reply 8 of 14
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sestewart View Post



    Would be great to see Photos released before the holidays, but everything I've seen shows sometime next year.



    Having said that, anything with wifi fixes is appreciated.



    I believe, if my memory serves correctly, that when they intro'd iOS 8 and/or Yosemite that they said iPhotos was going away and that the new Photos for the Mac would be available at the beginning of next year. That was not too long before everyone discovered that they had done away with the Camera Roll in iOS 8 and they hustled to make it accessible so that all the Camera and Photo Editing and touch up stuff still had something to access and a way to reasonably store on the Mac.

  • Reply 9 of 14
    Just fix the Wi-Fi. I am getting pretty tired of of it going to zero speed.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,018member
    And this will patch my damn tweak for Continuity and Hand-Off in my Mac Mini 2011.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    fallenjt wrote: »
    And this will patch my damn tweak for Continuity and Hand-Off in my Mac Mini 2011.

    I just realized, because of your post, that Handoff/Continuity hasn't been working since I did the last iOS point update.
  • Reply 12 of 14
    So no mention of graphics. Those of us suffering under dismal opencl implementation and problems with new Mac pros, or old Mac pros with AMD cards have no solutions in sight.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post



    And it won't be the last beta.  When my iMac restarted it went straight to the Desktop.  The completion progress dialog was still there and it said "5 minutes remaining."  It didn't ask me for my password until the progress indicator finished, at which point it presented the login / password view as expected.



    Other than that it seems fine.




    1) I don't understand how, of all companies, Apple can't even get a decent ballpark of how long installations will take. I understand with Windows, but Apple should be able to be able to calculate something better than "5 minutes remaining" with more than the half the progress bar remaining when it finishes up, especially with their limited HW choices. This doesn't seem insurmountable and I feel like they did better at this many years ago.



    2) That auto-logging in with an update has been standard for at least Yosemite and perhaps even Mavericks. Since you have to use a password to initiate the install it carries over. I'm not sure how it does that with a restart in place or if that's safe, but I don't think it's a glitch.



    I understand your frustrations - take your first set up with a Time Capsule, my experience is that it takes approx. 19 hours with my current setup. Part of that is this using WiFi to connect instead of 100 Base T wired or better.

     

    I think the big problem is that most users (not necessarily you) have a number of programs open in the background (e.g., iTunes, Safari, Mail, 1Password, Dictionary, Xcode to name but a few). When you have that many processes running at once (even if you kill the apps you have running) there are a bunch of daemons running in the background (a quick check in Activity Monitor shows I have 254 processes with 1364 threads but CPU idle time jumps around although in a situation like this it runs 97% idle for user although system can be 53% of that being used. This varies over time (can be wildly). For tasks that take longer 15-20 minutes initial estimate you may notice that the time can vary quite a bit i.e., what may start as 16 min may go up to 19 mins but the precipitously drop faster say down to 10 mins but then may go back up to 13 mins. Network related things are notorious for that as it is very hard to estimate the load as it varies from device to another.

     

    As far as migrating photos say from iPhotos to Photos (similar issue when updating Contacts) there is much more involved here that just a quick shuffle. The suggestion that your "drive is already indexed" is a fallacy in gaining any speed. The contents of iPhotos, Contacts, et al are stored in a database. I believe that at one time iPhoto was built on a 3rd party Object Database that was not relational but has smoother niceties others use mySQL along with an XML map of the contents - this exposes some of the info of where these files actually live since it is usually not practical to store images of varying size directly in the database since even doing a subtable of the image would necessarily mean disassembling each image from its meta data and then storing that in a db table and having to reassemble them upon access which would mean you would have to use an API from iPhoto to access any picture at anytime as well as it complicating the ability to revert to the original photo after saving your changes.

     

    The varying size and number of images, or in the case of iTunes the music, apps, podcasts etc...can play havoc with your hard drive trying to store stuff in blocks scattered around your disk (fragmentation cause performance to drop) although fragmentation is usually not an as big an issue with modern, usually, much larger drives available as well as changes to the file system from the old HFS+ to the more modern Mac Journaled (Extended) File System we still have a need to use larger contiguous than is.

     

    The bottom line is that there are many more things happening on your Mac or iOS device (networking, multiple processes for user apps but also system deamons, and mass storage issues) that are not apparent from first glance that can change the estimated install time.

     

    I too would like to see progress information during installs give me some sort of better feedback, possibly the current thermometer along with the components left to be installed in advanced mode (like a disclosure triangle or the little i with the circle around it.

  • Reply 14 of 14

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Command_F View Post

     

    I'm disappointed that there's no mention of Bluetooth here. My Magic Mouse has been a real chose to connect since the Yosemite upgrade. If the mouse is not turned on when the Mac boots, it can be impossible to get the Mac to recognise it (turn mouse on and off, turn bluetooth on and off, repreatedly hit 'connect', shout at it, nothing works reliably). Needless to say, it was all fine under Mavericks :embarrass

     

    Anyone got any good advice? And if anyone is suffering the problem, sometimes starting Bluetooth Explorer will cause 'connect' to work but it's not a certainty.


     

    I have not had any problems with the Magic Mouse on my 2013 iMac, but at times my touch pad on my 2011 iMac has been flakey. I have found that simply turning it off and on again usually solved the problem. It has only became a problem in the 2nd beta and so far the latest seems to be fine.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by miltenb View Post



    Just fix the Wi-Fi. I am getting pretty tired of of it going to zero speed.

     

    I am beginning to wonder if it is a problem especially in iPhone 6/6+ series radios (and the workaround is causing a problem elsewhere).

     

    Also I have always had poor WiFi in my house. We do run 9 client devices but I have the latest Time Capsule Airport wired to two other Airports in a small house (<2000 sq ft). I think part of it may be the construction of this house because I do not see this kind of issue at other places I visit frequently. May seem silly but even with them all the routers high and away from walls (as recommended in the KB) signal does not propagate well thru more than one single wall. It also makes a difference if we close the door on the main room (my office) -- I cannot reliably get a WiFi signal in the MBR which is immediately adjacent to the office if door is closed (there is a walk in closet that adds another wall there). This has been since the beginning of my use of WiFi in the house in approx. 2005.

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