Samsung touts open 'Internet of things' push, says all products to be connected in 5 years

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 53
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    adyb wrote: »
    I'm just wondering why? Why do they all need to talk to each other? What does my washing machine need to say to my toaster? I don't want my refrigerator talking to the supermarket as I don't always want the same things & I don't want stuff ordering automatically if it thinks I'm running out of something.

    Maybe if they could get my washing to automatically beam over to my dryer there might be some value but otherwise it just sounds like [tinfoil hat time] a means of gathering more personal information.

    Aside from the fact that I have decided that I will not buy any Samsung branded goods (components I can do nothing about), I am more likely to avoid electrical goods that offer this, as it seems to simply be adding complexity/cost where it's not needed.

    Rant over!

    Yes yes yes! Extrapolate this out and it's kind of scary. Not every device has to be smart and think on my behalf. I want my toaster to just make me a really good slice of toast not order bread from the supermarket when it thinks I'm running low.
  • Reply 22 of 53
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    The Verge's liveblog coverage of this ludicrous event was hilarious and spared no insults.

    That's interesting as most Verge articles these days read like company PR. Or sensationalist clickbait. Seriously I think one of the last articles I saw on the Verge that didn't read like a company marketing piece was their article on ?Watch after the event last September.
  • Reply 23 of 53
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,934member

    Ah, another rider on the IoT bandwagon, our latest candidate for the reinflation of the dot com bubble. While I believe there is a lot of value in the connectedness between devices that share a strong contextual relationship around a shared purpose, task, workflow, value chain, etc., the latest crop of conglomerates to jump on IoT bandwagon like Samsung nearly always fail to articulate the customer value or customer pain points within their market that will be served by the supposed technological breakthrough. It's simply another large corporation jumping on a bandwagon because it's the latest me-too, cool, tech media darling, technology de jour that does good press while saying little to nothing at all that compels prospective customers to reach for their wallets. I'll take two orders of IoT with some M2M and big data on the side. 

  • Reply 24 of 53
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    They worry about Apple's interconnectivity and see pushing open standards as a strategic move against it. But it won't work, case in point: iDevices have a fully standards compliant web browser and yet people still use apps.

     

    More generally, the problem with his plan is that it's not one or the other: a device can implement a standards compliant interface and a proprietary one and customers are not ideological, they will just use the best one. And Apple's own integration will likely be better than the standard simply because standards take years of haggling and agreement to settle, and in that time a company like Apple can add many new features to their proprietary interface.

     

    If Samsung want to beat Apple, they need to make better products, not try silly strategic gambits. There's really no way around that. 

  • Reply 25 of 53

    Question is, can thieves, sorry *hackers* wait that long for their home invasion sprees?

  • Reply 26 of 53
    technotechno Posts: 732member

    Great! Now I have to worry about my washing machine having malware or a virus. Some 14 year old kid in russia is going to put spyware in my pyjamas.

     

    I wonder if now we will have to rent our appliances and if we don't make a payment, no coffee or no clean dishes.

  • Reply 27 of 53
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    rogifan wrote: »
    That's interesting as most Verge articles these days read like company PR. Or sensationalist clickbait. Seriously I think one of the last articles I saw on the Verge that didn't read like a company marketing piece was their article on ?Watch after the event last September.

    They've really gone downhill since egotistical, smarmy Nilay Patel took over for the departing Josh (I forget his last name). Patel had previously appeared to be drunk multiple times appearing in various podcasts, so it's possible this is a problem for this kid.
  • Reply 28 of 53
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    techno wrote: »
    Great! Now I have to worry about my washing machine having malware or a virus. Some 14 year old kid in russia is going to put spyware in my pyjamas.

    I wonder if now we will have to rent our appliances and if we don't make a payment, no coffee or no clean dishes.

    No, you won't have to worry because you'll refuse to buy Samsung. ????
  • Reply 29 of 53
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,022member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LarryA View Post



    Great! I wonder what the best antivirus software will be for my toaster.

    yep and one for the refig and oven, do not want my food being infected. With all the sheepeoples in the world and I heard of people things they got sick because their computer had a virus, image what people will begin to think if your refig got an virus.

  • Reply 30 of 53
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,022member

    I am really trying not to be old here, but do we need all of our appliances connect and talking to one another. Other than to eat I barely interact with my appliances, why would the average person have a need to check on what their stove or refrig is doing when they are not standing in front of it. I do not see the need, it appears to be just another gimmick to make you pay more. It hard enough to find a good basic appliance which just works with all kinds of bells and whistles which break over time.

  • Reply 31 of 53
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    maestro64 wrote: »
    I am really trying not to be old here, but do we need all of our appliances connect and talking to one another. Other than to eat I barely interact with my appliances, why would the average person have a need to check on what their stove or refrig is doing when they are not standing in front of it. I do not see the need, it appears to be just another gimmick to make you pay more. It hard enough to find a good basic appliance which just works with all kinds of bells and whistles which break over time.

    Samsung is flailing.
  • Reply 32 of 53
    takeotakeo Posts: 428member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post



    Hopefully you can get Toast for it. image

     

    It will only work with Samsung bread.

  • Reply 33 of 53
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    takeo wrote: »
    It will only work with Samsung bread.

    Thankfully I'm on a low-carb Samsung-free diet.
  • Reply 34 of 53
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,611moderator
    Yeah, we need an 'open standard' called Tizen, right? :rolleyes:

    Samsung can eat turf. No one with any sense would trust them.

    Speaking of trust, there are a few recent articles talking about how advertisers are being allowed access to snoop on private data, including photos:

    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/video/smartphone-apps-access-kids-photos-110121273.html

    The video there keeps highlighting iPhones and lumping them in with all mobile devices but the articles about it narrow it down:

    https://bgr.com/2014/12/31/android-app-permissions-and-privacy/
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2895004/What-Android-apps-know-Researchers-reveal-software-listen-microphone-access-contacts-knows-exactly-are.html

    Being 'open' is well-intentioned but if it's being pushed by an advertising company, then being open on the internet is more like being naked in a shopping center. If you look at the comments in the bottom link, you can see all the Android fans taking the usual route:

    "The same happens to Apple."
    "All smartphone apps collect data whatever the operating system. Strange that iOS with the most apps (always a big boast mentioned by its followers everywhere) is not included? Is this another Apple planted story?"

    The following were heavily downvoted:

    "I bought a couple of Android phones in recent years, but I junked them because of the poor quality of Android apps and the general lack of security and privacy. I'm now using an iPhone 6 Plus and an iPad Air 2. There's a lot to be said for Apple's closed environment."
    "Android = Bloatware = lower internal memory FORCING YOU TO BUY A MEMORY CARD WHICH COULD GET INFECTED FROM ANOTHER PHONE OR PC = pathetic non compatible updates for os = plastic junk phones that always fall apart when dropped = new phones every flipping month being released = tragic but funny infections and viruses from dodgy developers = cheap tacky untested apps from Google play = loads of back door access to compromise security = stick this plastic crap in the bin !!!!!"

    The idea of having all devices do their own things their own way and have them all interoperate is a nice idea but a controlled environment has its advantages too. CarPlay is a controlled environment but it operates with multiple manufacturers.
  • Reply 35 of 53
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,677member
    maestro64 wrote: »
    I am really trying not to be old here, but do we need all of our appliances connect and talking to one another. Other than to eat I barely interact with my appliances, why would the average person have a need to check on what their stove or refrig is doing when they are not standing in front of it. I do not see the need, it appears to be just another gimmick to make you pay more. It hard enough to find a good basic appliance which just works with all kinds of bells and whistles which break over time.
    There are many things we don't need but have and use anyway. In the scenario of connected appliances- the toaster lets your iWatch know when your toast is done, ditto the oven or the washing machine while your TV tells you when SoA, is ready to view. Will all these notifications enrich our lives? As with most technology it is debatable, but it will be the driver behind every sales campaign for the foreseeable future. Pretty sure of that.
  • Reply 36 of 53
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,389member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post



    Being 'open' is well-intentioned but if it's being pushed by an advertising company, then being open on the internet is more like being naked in a shopping center.

     

    Open is only well-intentioned in academia.  As soon as a corporation latches on to the concept, the intention is almost always to get free/cheap labour (shortcut product development time) and/or to use it as a marketing strategy.  The ruse is that their intentions are to make everything interoperable, and some of the people working for that company may actually believe that and work in that direction for a while.  But when push comes to shove, they'll divert resources back to things which maintain their main revenue streams.

     

    I mean, wasn't device interoperability the whole goal of the Open Handset Alliance in the first place?  And how's that worked out so far?  Can a Samsung phone transfer data seamlessly to/from an HTC phone without installing anything extra or using a cloud service?  What would the incentive be for Samsung or HTC to allow customers to easily switch between the two brands?

     

    The only reason why Google created the OHA in the first place was to ensure that any manufacturer that uses Android must keep Google's services deeply integrated into their product (to maintain their data-mining revenue stream).  They don't care when, say, Samsung creates their own proprietary device-to-device data transfer technology.  But they sure care when, say, Motorola tries to replace their map service with that of a competitor.  Follow the money.

  • Reply 37 of 53
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,678member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

     

    I am really trying not to be old here, but do we need all of our appliances connect and talking to one another. Other than to eat I barely interact with my appliances, why would the average person have a need to check on what their stove or refrig is doing when they are not standing in front of it. I do not see the need, it appears to be just another gimmick to make you pay more. It hard enough to find a good basic appliance which just works with all kinds of bells and whistles which break over time.




    No its all nonsense. The two things that need to be connected are your home security system and the TV and existing protocols handle both. Some people say home heating - but I use a timer so I am done. 

     

    Everything else doesn't need to be smart or can be controlled - like lighting - from home by a device. Like and iPhone.

  • Reply 38 of 53
    jexusjexus Posts: 373member

    Have fun with your thing there Samsung.

     

    I'll just stick to Arduino and Raspberry pi projects for my IoT needs. You know...those actual open hardware projects.

  • Reply 39 of 53
    jexus wrote: »
    Have fun with your thing there Samsung.

    I'll just stick to Arduino and Raspberry pi projects for my IoT needs. You know...those actual open hardware projects.

    You're right. If they were remotely interested in openness, they'd adapt to interoperability with those open standards.
  • Reply 40 of 53
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,059member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by paxman View Post



    the toaster lets your iWatch know when your toast is done

     

    One should never leave a toaster unattended while in use.  I'm not saying you have to constantly stare at it, but you should be within a few feet, in case something goes wrong.

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