First look: Misfit Bolt, an iOS-connected smart lightbulb

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2015
Misfit --?backed by former Apple CEO John Sculley --?announced its first foray into the connected home this week, unveiling the $49 Misfit Bolt iOS-connected smart lightbulb.




Like most other connected light bulbs, Misfit's low-cost Bolt can be used to set the mood in a room by altering its color individually or via a series of pre-set scenes. Unlike competitors, however, Bolt is designed to work with Misfit's existing lineup of sleep and activity trackers.

At this week's Consumer Electronics Show, Misfit representatives told AppleInsider that Bolt will communicate with the company's Shine wristband and Beddit sleep tracker so that it knows when users go to sleep and wake up. Using this data, Bolt can work as a sort of visual alarm, rousing buyers from their sleep by emulating a natural sunrise.




The demonstration unit that we saw on the show floor appeared to be a good-quality bulb, demonstrating excellent color fidelity and temperature. Bolt scores 90 on the color rendering index --?a measure of LED-based bulbs' color reproduction capabilities --?which is a significant achievement. Philips's competing Hue, for instance, scores just one point higher.

Unlike Hue, Bolt does not require a hub. It connects directly to users' mobile devices, and can be controlled by Misfit's existing iOS app (though a Bolt-specific version is on the way.)




Bolt is available for pre-order now, with shipping expected in mid-February. Buyers can pick up one Bolt for $49.99, or a three-pack for $129.99.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    Nice to see Sculley has been able to build upon the role of Misfit Chief that he initiated at Apple.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    Glad to see a real competitor to Hue finally materializing. Hopefully this will provide Philips with incentive to improve and reduce the prices of their own product.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    jonrojonro Posts: 59member
    Is it compatible with Wink?
  • Reply 4 of 13
    blazarblazar Posts: 270member
    Im not so sure multicolor lightbulbs will catch on in homes... There is a reason 2500k white lightbulbs are the color that they are...

    Our brains seem to like colors rendered in approximately the color of daylight sun it seems.

    These lights seem like nice novelties mainly. I want simple remote lightbulbs that are cheap and LED. Or perhaps a universal lightbulb holder that allows you to use various bulbs.
  • Reply 5 of 13
    We are used to yellow bulbs because that's what incandescent bulbs produced. If the light bulb was invented today it would be white, not yellow. People are just used to yellow. Yellow bulbs are 2700k where sunlight is 5600k, much whiter than the typical home bulb. Go buy some white 5000K bulbs and live with them for 3 months and you'll see how ugly yellow light looks.
  • Reply 6 of 13
    So am I understanding this correctly in that you just need this bulb and an iOS app? And nothing else!?
  • Reply 7 of 13
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by daren_mitchell View Post



    So am I understanding this correctly in that you just need this bulb and an iOS app? And nothing else!?

     

    I'd have to assume you at least also need a wifi network at home for the bulb to sign into. Which I'm not sure about being a great idea! One reason the Hue uses a hub is that they use a more-efficient lower-energy-cost signal to communicate with the hub, and sort out and control the various bulbs from the hub, without a storm of wifi signals from every individual device in the house. 

  • Reply 8 of 13
    Oh sorry, WiFi was a given. IoT demands nothing less. ;-)
  • Reply 9 of 13
    Hopefully this puts pressure on this market so we see higher quality, more options and way lower prices...
  • Reply 10 of 13

    Very nice, but honestly, I don't want to have to take my phone out of my pocket every time I leave or enter a room to switch the lights. I do want to use the light switch. I only consider a product like this when it lets me control the light with my iPhone in combination with the traditional light switch on the wall.

  • Reply 11 of 13
    tjwolftjwolf Posts: 396member
    Anyone else think these "smart" lightbulbs an incredible waste of resources? While LEDs definitely last longer than incandescents, they do wear out (although I have no experience with LED bulbs, I've had several CFLs fail way before their advertised lifespan). And when they do, you're throwing away not only the lighting component, but also whatever electronics that makes them "smart".

    And to what end? The only benefit I can think of is the gimmicky color changing ability. All other "smart" benefits are more efficiently achieved using a "smart" light switch!
  • Reply 12 of 13
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,594member
    We are used to yellow bulbs because that's what incandescent bulbs produced. If the light bulb was invented today it would be white, not yellow. People are just used to yellow. Yellow bulbs are 2700k where sunlight is 5600k, much whiter than the typical home bulb. Go buy some white 5000K bulbs and live with them for 3 months and you'll see how ugly yellow light looks.

    Sorry but you are only partially right. The color of sunlight you mentioned is only at mid-day. Sunlight at dawn and sunset is closer to the incandescent light - I think you would agree that in fact sunrise and sunset are beautiful times of the day with their warm glowing light. This is why sunset is one of the best times of the day for photography and film-making - it is called "the golden hour".
  • Reply 13 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jeffzacharias View Post



    We are used to yellow bulbs because that's what incandescent bulbs produced. If the light bulb was invented today it would be white, not yellow. People are just used to yellow. Yellow bulbs are 2700k where sunlight is 5600k, much whiter than the typical home bulb. Go buy some white 5000K bulbs and live with them for 3 months and you'll see how ugly yellow light looks.

     

    No.

     

    Sunlight can't be reduced to one colour; it’s a myriad of different colours. Its light is particularly pleasant at sunset, when it’s a warm yellow. As such, yellow is also the popular colour for the home. Most artificial white light is much too cold, in a way that sunlight isn't. Yellow light is also more suitable for the home, as the time when we rely on artificial light the most is in the evening, when we are shortly due to go to sleep. Yellow light is a good way to tell our bodies that sleep is imminent. If we had a bright, white light, it would do the opposite.

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