Roundup: The best Apple-compatible accessories seen at CES day one

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2015
With the first official day of CES in the books, AppleInsider offers a roundup of the best new products we spotted at the annual consumer electronics event that tap into the Apple ecosystem.

Made for iPhone licensed battery cases for iPhone 6 & 6 Plus


My uNu unveiled new affordable battery cases for Apple's iPhone 6


Perhaps most noteworthy for owners of Apple's new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus were the arrival of Made for iPhone certified battery cases. The new Apple-licensed protective cases include Lightning connectors and integrated batteries, providing users with more juice on the go.

Leading the pack was Mophie, well known for its Juice Pack cases. It announced a new $99.95 Juice Pack Air for iPhone 6 that doubles battery life, a $119.95 Juice Pack Plus model with 120 percent boost, and the $99.95 Juice Pack for iPhone 6 Plus offering 60 percent more power.

Otterbox also unveiled a version of its Resurgence Power Case series that will double iPhone 6 battery life for $99.95.

And for those looking for a more affordable option, AppleInsider also spotted My uNu's new Made for iPhone 6 lineup, starting at $59.99 for a 2,400mAh battery case, while a 3,000mAh model runs $79.99.

Wearables everywhere




Unsurprisingly, wearable devices compatible with Apple's iOS ecosystem are in abundance at this year's CES. One of the more interesting innovations seen by AppleInsider on the show floor was the fashion-focused Swarovski Shine from Misfit.

Misfit's collaboration with jewelry maker Swarovski has resulted in two distinct models featuring a large, faceted Swarovski crystal face in either clear or violet. The violet variant comes with solar charging capabilities that all but eliminate the need for plugging in.

By placing the specially designed Swarovski "energy crystal" on the Misfit Shine's front face, it can gather light and convert it into electricity with an onboard solar array. Misfit claims its method is highly efficient, requiring just 15 minutes of sunlight for a full recharge.

The wearable, waterproof devices track movement data using onboard sensors, allowing for step, fitness, and sleep tracking. Swarovski Shine is scheduled to launch this spring at a starting price of $169.99 for the basic version, while the solar-powered violet version will debut in mid-2015 for an undisclosed sum.

Other wearable devices spied by AppleInsider at CES day one included an updated Basis Peak with iOS notification support, Magellan Echo Fit sports watch with 8-month battery life, and the next-generation Narrative Clip 2 "life cam" for capturing everything throughout your day.

Smarter homes with Apple's HomeKit


The Stack Lighting Alpha is a HomeKit-connected smart, automated lightbulb.


Finally, smart home accessories are also a big focus at CES this year, and many products unsurprisingly tap into Apple's HomeKit functionality baked into iOS 8.

In particular, HomeKit was a major focus at the ShowStoppers @ CES event held Tuesday evening, where startups showed off a range of "Internet of Things" solutions for connected homes.

HomeKit products at the mini-expo show included the Stack Lighting Alba, a "responsive lightbulb" including motion and ambient light sensors that learns to turn itself on and off, and adjust brightness and shift colors according to preset variables and normal usage patterns. While HomeKit support is not yet available, the company said it is in the works for a future update.

Schlage also introduced its new Sense smart lock, a HomeKit-compatible keyless lock that lets owners control and manage up to 30 access codes at once. Codes for secure entry can be entered on the device's built-in touchscreen when the product launches later in 2015, though pricing hasn't been announced.

There's also the Insteon Hub, which lets iOS device owners control Insteon switches, outlets, thermostats and light bulbs via HomeKit. And the Incipio Direct line of HomeKit compatible accessories include a smart outlet, light bulb adapter, and power strip. HomeKit compatibility allows accessories to be more easily controlled via iPhone, including support for Siri voice commands.

Not yet supporting HomeKit, however, is the newly announced Misfit Bolt, an iOS-connected smart lightbulb priced at $49.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    I want to see a HomeKit wall outlet that completely replaces your existing wall outlet. After it is installed in looks just like a standard wall outlet. Once this is done I think it will go main stream.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    The lightbulbs will probably take off at some point. I can imagine a future where people think it's strange that we used to have to turn lights on and off by hand when entering/leaving a room. They will make an environmental argument that it will save electricity.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    ascii wrote: »
    The lightbulbs will probably take off at some point. I can imagine a future where people think it's strange that we used to have to turn lights on and off by hand when entering/leaving a room. They will make an environmental argument that it will save electricity.

    I don't want to live in a world where the smartest thing in the room is the lightbulb. The Clapper already represented the beginning of the end.
  • Reply 4 of 18
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,034member
    holton wrote: »
    I want to see a HomeKit wall outlet that completely replaces your existing wall outlet. After it is installed in looks just like a standard wall outlet. Once this is done I think it will go main stream.

    We've had these for decades as part of the old X-10 infrastructure. I've had some. I see no reason why they won't be done for this as well. But I imagine companies are first concentrating on ease of use, and replacing an outlet isn't easy, or safe, for most folks.
  • Reply 5 of 18
    How annoying will it be to walk into a dark room and before you can see to pick something up and leave you have to get out your phone, open an app or tell Siri to turn on the lights. how freaking hard is it to flip a switch. I don't even use CFL's in all my light fixtures because they take too long to warm up. if i am only in a room for a minute or two the CFL has just started to get bright by the time i flip the switch off. i see these as purley a novelty. My parents have had motion sensor light switches for 10 yrs now and those actually work very well. and they use whatever bulb they want at a cost of about $20 a room. I see no benefit other then getting a tech chubby to be able to control your lights with your phone.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    mehranmehran Posts: 53member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Holton View Post



    I want to see a HomeKit wall outlet that completely replaces your existing wall outlet. After it is installed in looks just like a standard wall outlet. Once this is done I think it will go main stream.



    I have Insteon and I have such outlets (one is controllable and one is open and not controllable).  Instead just announced a new HUB that is supposed to be HomeKit compatible and I look forward to see how Insteon moves forward in that arena knowing that I will probably have to upgrade my hub.

     

    What is not totally clear is a lack of a master HUB from Apple.  There have been rumors of next gen AppleTV to be such a device but nothing on that front. 

     

    I rather wait for version 1.1 of HomeKit with more from Apple before upgrading my large Insteon installation.

  • Reply 7 of 18
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,034member
    ascii wrote: »
    The lightbulbs will probably take off at some point. I can imagine a future where people think it's strange that we used to have to turn lights on and off by hand when entering/leaving a room. They will make an environmental argument that it will save electricity.

    True. But it's all about price, and these prices are just way too high for the utility. I've been replacing most of my compact fluorescent bulbs with LED over the past couple of years, as output and efficiency has improved dramatically, and as price has dropped accordingly. When Cree came out with their $13 60 watt equiv bulbs, that caused a significant price drop everywhere.

    But $50 is just way too much for a low output bulb, even if it's RGB, and controllable.
  • Reply 8 of 18
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,034member
    How annoying will it be to walk into a dark room and before you can see to pick something up and leave you have to get out your phone, open an app or tell Siri to turn on the lights. how freaking hard is it to flip a switch. I don't even use CFL's in all my light fixtures because they take too long to warm up. if i am only in a room for a minute or two the CFL has just started to get bright by the time i flip the switch off. i see these as purley a novelty. My parents have had motion sensor light switches for 10 yrs now and those actually work very well. and they use whatever bulb they want at a cost of about $20 a room. I see no benefit other then getting a tech chubby to be able to control your lights with your phone.

    That's not the way these things are intended to work. After they're set up, they perform functions by themselves. One way they work is to sense when you're there, and turn on by themselves, and off again when you leave. This is just the beginning. As these things take off, more functionality will be added as prices continue to drop.

    Just think of these as automobiles in the 1910's, as far as technology goes. They're not for everybody yet, but in another few years, yes.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,055member

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by melgross View Post



    After they're set up, they perform functions by themselves. One way they work is to sense when you're there, and turn on by themselves, and off again when you leave. This is just the beginning. As these things take off, more functionality will be added as prices continue to drop.

     

    I'm particularly interested to see how the new technology manages differentiation between a pet, and say, a young child.

  • Reply 10 of 18
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member
    pscooter63 wrote: »
    Quote:
    melgross wrote: »
    After they're set up, they perform functions by themselves. One way they work is to sense when you're there, and turn on by themselves, and off again when you leave. This is just the beginning. As these things take off, more functionality will be added as prices continue to drop.

    I'm particularly interested to see how the new technology manages differentiation between a pet, and say, a young child.

    By their different implanted chips, of course.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member
    Quote:

     ....a new $99.95 Juice Pack Air for iPhone 6 that doubles battery life, a $119.95 Juice Pack Plus model [for the iPhone 6] with 120 percent boost, and the $99.95 Juice Pack for iPhone 6 Plus offering 60 percent more power.




    Hmmmm... ...Mophie kind of put themselves in a naming box... 

     

    ...is that why there's no fourth model to round out the line, i.e., the "Juice Pack for iPhone 6 Plus Plus"...??  :p 

  • Reply 12 of 18
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    pscooter63 wrote: »
    Quote:

    I'm particularly interested to see how the new technology manages differentiation between a pet, and say, a young child.

    Goo-goo gaa-gaa= baby

    Woof or meow=dog or cat, respectively
  • Reply 13 of 18
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,632member

    The whole home automation concept is way, way overhyped. Much of it pointless and of no value. I can sort of see a new home being designed from the ground up with built-in conceptually integrated features. But most consumers will be faced with some sort of retrofitting task.

     

    Here's the rule: your consumer item can't take away any feature from an existing technology. Having a remote control to anything *must not* remove existing functionality. If a switch on the wall controls the light, it must always be able to control the light. No functions can be added or removed to solely the remote control. Violating this principle is an instant deal killer for me.

  • Reply 14 of 18
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Holton View Post



    I want to see a HomeKit wall outlet that completely replaces your existing wall outlet. After it is installed in looks just like a standard wall outlet. Once this is done I think it will go main stream.

     

    because nothing says "mass adoption" like DIY wiring projects or hiring an electrician...

  • Reply 15 of 18
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jeff-hackintosh View Post



    How annoying will it be to walk into a dark room and before you can see to pick something up and leave you have to get out your phone, open an app or tell Siri to turn on the lights. how freaking hard is it to flip a switch. I don't even use CFL's in all my light fixtures because they take too long to warm up. if i am only in a room for a minute or two the CFL has just started to get bright by the time i flip the switch off. i see these as purley a novelty. My parents have had motion sensor light switches for 10 yrs now and those actually work very well. and they use whatever bulb they want at a cost of about $20 a room. I see no benefit other then getting a tech chubby to be able to control your lights with your phone.

     

    try using or researching the products youre poo-pooing next time -- popular smart lights like the Philips Hue system 100% work w/ switches, you dont need to fish out your phone to turn them on or off. they just happen to have a bunch of functionality in addition to a switch.

     

    also, CFL is out. warm-color-temp LEDs are better than CFLs.

  • Reply 16 of 18
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    try using or researching the products youre poo-pooing next time -- popular smart lights like the Philips Hue system 100% work w/ switches, you dont need to fish out your phone to turn them on or off. they just happen to have a bunch of functionality in addition to a switch.

     

    also, CFL is out. warm-color-temp LEDs are better than CFLs.




    i guess i was mistaken on the usage of these.  I still don't see any real value to color changing light bulbs and especially not at the prices that are being asked for them.  I would like to see the learning of habits tech integrated into the switch.  i think there would be much more value add to that then the bulb itself.  

  • Reply 17 of 18
    holton wrote: »
    I want to see a HomeKit wall outlet that completely replaces your existing wall outlet. After it is installed in looks just like a standard wall outlet. Once this is done I think it will go main stream.
    The Insteon 2663 (http://www.insteon.com/outlets-menu) works fine, and the Insteon hub will support Homekit (as Mehran said).
    I use Insteon devices with UDI's ISY 994 controller, and they are rock solid - able to control devices in the orchard which is over 1000 feet from the controller.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by melgross View Post





    True. But it's all about price, and these prices are just way too high for the utility. I've been replacing most of my compact fluorescent bulbs with LED over the past couple of years, as output and efficiency has improved dramatically, and as price has dropped accordingly. When Cree came out with their $13 60 watt equiv bulbs, that caused a significant price drop everywhere.



    But $50 is just way too much for a low output bulb, even if it's RGB, and controllable.



    I have LEDs in every room now too, but I didn't do it for energy saving reasons! My house has terrible wiring and normal bulbs (and CFLs) typically blow in about 6 weeks, but LEDs seem to last forever, so that was a happy discovery.

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