Pella unveils iOS-compatible home automation adapters for connected windows & doors

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2015
Pella Windows and Doors is at CES this week, showing off its new Insynctive family of smart home products, bringing iOS connectivity to sensors for doors, shades, blinds, garages and more.




AppleInsider paid a visit to the Pella booth on Thursday, where the company was showing off a range of products that allow devices to be retrofitted to connect to the "Internet of Things."

The new Pella Insynctive technology products will debut on Jan. 19. Pricing will run $50 for two sensors, and $80 for the connected bridge that controls and connects everything.

Pella Insynctive smart home products include window and door sensors, garage door sensors, entry door deadbolt sensor, status indicator, bridge and motorized blinds and shades.




"We don't make windows and doors for homes, we make windows and doors for people. People who are asking for solutions to better control their homes and work spaces," said Larry Ehlinger, general manager--Insynctive business unit, Pella Windows and Doors. "We believe Insynctive smart home technology delivers a solution that allows homeowners to control the level of security, comfort and convenience they want in their home from their windows and doors."

Pella's strategy allows homeowners to choose the products they need to get the level of home management they want. That means that users can either have a single sensor on the front door, or outfit their entire home with Insynctive sensors, blinds and shades if they so choose.

Insynctive products can be controlled through the Wink smart home control app available for free on the iOS App Store. Wink is compatible with other leading brands such as GE, Honeywell, Dropcam, Kwikset, Schlage, and Quirky.




The Insynctive family of smart products includes:

Window, door and garage door sensors
  • Insynctive Window, Door and Garage Door Sensors wirelessly relay information via the Bridge to the Insynctive Status Indicator so, while at home, users know at a glance whether windows and doors are opened or closed.
  • Insynctive Window and Door Sensors mount easily to most any brand of window or door--no tools required. The Insynctive Garage Door Sensor mounts to most types of tilting or lifting garage doors.
>Entry door deadbolt sensor
  • Insynctive Entry Door Deadbolt Sensor can be installed with a new Pella entry door and will indicate if the door is closed and locked.
>Pella blinds and shades with remote control and Insynctive technology
  • Pella's Designer Series snap-in between-the-glass blinds and shades and Pella roomside blinds and shades are available with motorized Insynctive technology. While at home, homeowners can control all the blinds and shades in a room using the remote control.
  • Additionally, Pella blinds and shades with Insynctive technology can be programmed to a compatible home automation system via the Insynctive bridge and operated from a smart device.
  • Homeowners can choose between cellular shades, roller shades, wood blinds and between-the-glass blinds or shades with Insynctive technology. Available Summer 2015.
  • Pella Insynctive technology can help increase a home's comfort. Between-the-glass blinds or shades that feature this technology can block over 50 percent more of the sun's energy than windows without blinds or shades.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    davendaven Posts: 626member
    Good to see manufacturers like Pella come onboard. I have a lot of respect for the quality of their products.
  • Reply 2 of 8
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member

    I just want simple automated hardware with an 802.11 chip in it. Make it run on Wi-Fi–something we know will still be around for a very long time.

  • Reply 3 of 8
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,166member
    I just want simple automated hardware with an 802.11 chip in it. Make it run on Wi-Fi–something we know will still be around for a very long time.

    I am not sure you want all of these devices connected to your wifi. you TC and AirPort Extreme have limit of 50 connected devices and with all these things you might actually reach that limit.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    davendaven Posts: 626member
    I just want simple automated hardware with an 802.11 chip in it. Make it run on Wi-Fi–something we know will still be around for a very long time.
    nasserae wrote: »
    I am not sure you want all of these devices connected to your wifi. you TC and AirPort Extreme have limit of 50 connected devices and with all these things you might actually reach that limit.

    Yes but if you have a wifi hub can't you set it so that the hub connects to all the household sensors then bridges to your main router?
  • Reply 5 of 8
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

    I am not sure you want all of these devices connected to your wifi. you TC and AirPort Extreme have limit of 50 connected devices and with all these things you might actually reach that limit.

     

    So you have a router designated for just the home itself and another for the computers therein.

     

    Houses bought and sold based on the existence of central air, heating, and now an embedded Wi-Fi router for its smart devices.

  • Reply 6 of 8
    blinds or shades that feature this technology can block over 50 percent more of the sun's energy than windows without blinds or shades.

    Pretty sure that's true of non-magical blinds, shades or curtains. "Over 50%" seems to be underselling their product a little?
  • Reply 7 of 8
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveN View Post







    Yes but if you have a wifi hub can't you set it so that the hub connects to all the household sensors then bridges to your main router?

     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    So you have a router designated for just the home itself and another for the computers therein.

     

    Houses bought and sold based on the existence of central air, heating, and now an embedded Wi-Fi router for its smart devices.


     

    Neither of these is really the solution. The gateways and bridges that plug in to your existing routers limit the number of devices on the network, but lack the ability to take advantage of your whole network.

     

    I have a fairly decent size ranch that has two 802.11ac Airport Extremes at either end, connected via Ethernet run through the attic. This is the only way to get absolutely perfect Wi-FI performance in every part of the house, and deliver extra ethernet lines where I need them in my office.

     

    However, the gateway/bridge device for my lights only plugs in to one of them, and does not take advantage of the spread of my WiFi network....I have to choose one to plug it in to, and hope all of the bulbs in the house will be in range of that bridge....and they lose connection often enough that I feel like I'm push the limits of that range.

     

    The problem with Wi-Fi being being part of the home is, ANYTHING that gets "built in" is obsolete in a year, and ancient in 3 years. I just recently got into 802.11ac. I'm sure if anything were built in to my home in the last year or two, it would be N technology. 

     

    I don't want permanent or even semi permanent infrastructure that cannot be easily upgraded to keep up with technology.

     

    If you were a builder and you wanted to add smart home appliances to your next property as an incentive, you'd go around sourcing a bunch of the absolute latest unassociated and unrelated routers, lights, locks, sensors, and plugs. They'd cost a shit load of money, way more than it would be worth to the builder, none of it would work together (you'd need probably 4 different bridges and 5 different Apps), and all of it would be completely obsolete before the house sold.

     

    I don't know what the solution is, but home automation is still in a piece meal trial period, and it will take some serious effort in the market to bring it home, pun intended.

  • Reply 8 of 8
    kent909kent909 Posts: 730member
    What is the benefit of knowing if a window is open or closed? The best I see is that It may save me having to get my fat butt up off the couch and walk into the other room and look. That gives me a 50/50 chance of a wasted trip. If I can't operate the window remotely than what is the point? Most of this home automation stuff is pointless. Only things that allow me to control them remotely, or to program the operation make any sense.
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