Piper Jaffray sees a revamped Apple TV set-top box being core of Apple's fall 2015 products

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  • Reply 61 of 105

    I think Apple TV will diverge into two separate lines:

     

    1. Apple TV Mini - which is close to what we have currently.  It is meant primarily for consumption.  It is inexpensive so can be in EVERY ROOM of the house.

     

    2. Apple TV Gaming Edition.  This is larger, looks like a Mac Mini.   It will have the A9+ Processor.  It will have some local storage but nearly all the media will be stored in Mac on the same network or on iCloud.  

     

    The Apple TV Gaming Edition will be a full gaming console.  It can play games similar to Playstation 4, Nintendo, and XBox.

     

    Consumers can download games from iCloud with its new 4 GB limit.  This is a perfect size for immersive games.  

     

    Games can be bought from the iTunes store. 

     

    Consumers can use X-Box style controllers or they can use their iPhones. Nintendo style controllers are also possible.  Keyboards are possible.

     

    The Apple TV Gaming Edition can do Apps.  It can interface with Apple HomeKit to control your home.  You can remotely connect to the Apple TV Gaming Edition to monitor and control your home.

     

    Unlike "smart TVs" and Apple's rivals, it won't be recording your voice and sending the data to third parties.

     

    With mass quantities and a standard feature set, the Apple TV Gaming Edition can start at $199 to $399 - depending on storage and controller.

     

    Apple TV Gaming Edition would be a monster hit - with higher profit than the regular Apple TV puck.

  • Reply 62 of 105
    rogifan wrote: »
    I guess he's moved on from TV sets. Now he's pimping augmented reality and says that's the next big thing from Apple.
    I do wish the rumor about Apple getting into car business turns out to be true.
  • Reply 63 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    I suspect we'll see one this year, and I hope it comes with H.265/HEVC and 4K output along with iTS 4K options starting to appear.





    PS: Is it time to drop 720p as an option altogether once H.265 and 4K are available? I say that but I wouldn't expect the 1080p content to be converted to H.265, although it would be trivial to have 1080p options there.

     

    I am with you about the H.265/HEVC and 4K, but they still have SD and charge less for it. You need to set your sights on that before 720p. :) In reality the lower bandwidth of the SD content is probably needed for some users still. I don't mind it being available, but I generally won't watch it. I just want a 4K option from Apple. Since the latest A series can support it, the new box should have it.

  • Reply 64 of 105
    I am with you about the H.265/HEVC and 4K, but they still have SD and charge less for it. You need to set your sights on that before 720p. :) In reality the lower bandwidth of the SD content is probably needed for some users still. I don't mind it being available, but I generally won't watch it. I just want a 4K option from Apple. Since the latest A series can support it, the new box should have it.

    You're right, I completely ignored the still available SD versions. Perhaps 720p will become the new SD.


    PS: Remember when iTunes Store videos used to be 320x240? (I think I got that right.)
  • Reply 65 of 105
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    solipsismy wrote: »



    PS: Remember when iTunes Store videos used to be 320x240? (I think I got that right.)

    Oh you mean " near-DVD quality"? :lol:
  • Reply 66 of 105

    Good. I'm about ready to buy a FireTV. The ATV is nothing more than a glorified Netflix box cluttered with a dated and lame interface.

     

    At least the FireTV has games and other apps you can add through their store. 

     

    ATV is worse than stale.

     

    OHHHHH, Gene Munster is predicting? Okay, nix waiting for a new ATV. Or a more open platform with games. Rumor just lost its credibility - if it had any to begin with.

  • Reply 67 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,614member
    mstone wrote: »
    The thing about a stick is it works well mechanically because it just plugs in and stays there. Great for mounting TVs on the wall. The term set-top-box has been looking for a replacement for several years now because you can't really put anything on top of a TV. ?TV just isn't the right form factor in my opinion.

    I've never used a stick. Does the remote still work well even though it is not in the line of sight?
    I agree the stick concepts is the best one if it can retain its capabilities. I have never used one either so I don't know how well they work. And yes, the current 'puck' is too small and too light.
  • Reply 68 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,614member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    PS: Is it time to drop 720p as an option altogether once H.265 and 4K are available? I say that but I wouldn't expect the 1080p content to be converted to H.265, although it would be trivial to have 1080p options there.
    I have a 720 plasma and the quality is fantastic. Can one tell the difference if the TV is less than 50"? Rentals are also cheaper, so I say keep it for a while longer.
  • Reply 69 of 105
    In other news, empirical evidence suggests that Gene Munster from Piper Jaffrey has been completely wrong in his predictions for Apple at least 90% of the time over the past 6 years. Yet somehow he is still cited in news articles and stock valuations regarding said company. With this track record, one should be questioning why he is still relevant, much still gainfully employed as a tech stock financial analyst. Do not pay attention to this hack's guidance.
  • Reply 70 of 105
    paxman wrote: »
    I agree the stick concepts is the best one if it can retain its capabilities. I have never used one either so I don't know how well they work.

    They work fine, but I find the solution lacking because they still need an external power source.

    What I'd like to see — and Apple could do it — is make a open standard connection that would allow the video, non-video data, and power to be delivered into media displays* that will be compatible between media displayvendors and digital media devices. This could be as simple as a stick, or be larger and more complex, but there would be an area on every participating media display that would support these devices. For something as simple as the stick it could a 'I' rating and something larger, like the current Apple TV would have a 'III' rating for example, like how there were different sized ExpressCards.

    VESA has a DisplayPort standard that uses USB 3.1 for DP video, data, and power over the USB 3.1 plug interface.

    This way the living room and bedrooms can finally get updated, and those rooms can have the media displays that best suit their needs.


    * Calling them televisions seems too limiting in 2015.
  • Reply 71 of 105
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Hmm..still skeptical. People don't replace TVs that often. I think they want a nice TV with good picture quality and let their smarts come from what they connect to the TV. But who knows. It's hard for a $99 hockey puck to move the needle on revenues like a $1500 or $2000 TV would. All depends on how many consumers would buy an Apple branded TV. That space is highly competitive and costs keep coming down.

     

    TV's have 5-10% margins. Say, Apple would sell a $1500 TV and make $120 dollars off it... They make 2x more profit than that from the average iphone and even the watch would be way more worth it to Apple. If they sell a console like Apple TV for $300, they'd make as much from that as from a whole $1500 TV set.

  • Reply 72 of 105
    paxman wrote: »
    I have a 720 plasma and the quality is fantastic. Can one tell the difference if the TV is less than 50"? Rentals are also cheaper, so I say keep it for a while longer.

    I thought 720p and 1080p purchase and rentals cost the same amount? What if 720p was the new SD cost?
  • Reply 73 of 105
    eightzero wrote: »
    I can see it becoming an AppleTV "stick" like Chromecast, RokuStick, FireStick etc.

    The convenience and form factor of a USB stick would certainly have its advantages.

    As some have stated a potential negative about it is that Apple likes their products to stand out but I'm sure if there were sufficient benefits they would still do it.

    The bigger strike against this option I see is the possibility of Apple using it as a hub for HomeKit. If this is indeed where they are heading then the ?TV will need to have its own power supply. I know the USB ports on my LG TV don't provide power when the TV is in standby mode.

    I also don't see Apple heading in the direction of a cheaper/simplified ?TV with less features as would be the case for a stick device.
  • Reply 74 of 105
    solipsismy wrote: »
    I suspect we'll see one this year, and I hope it comes with H.265/HEVC and 4K output along with iTS 4K options starting to appear.


    PS: Is it time to drop 720p as an option altogether once H.265 and 4K are available? I say that but I wouldn't expect the 1080p content to be converted to H.265, although it would be trivial to have 1080p options there.

    Haven't you heard? Apple's shot past 4K and moved right on to 5K. Apple's also got the patent on the timing chip... Samsung is sooo last year!*

    *the above was written with my tongue planted slightly in my cheek.
  • Reply 75 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,614member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    They work fine, but I find the solution lacking because they still need an external power source.

    What I'd like to see — and Apple could do it — is make a open standard connection that would allow the video, non-video data, and power to be delivered into media displays* that will be compatible between media displayvendors and digital media devices. This could be as simple as a stick, or be larger and more complex, but there would be an area on every participating media display that would support these devices. For something as simple as the stick it could a 'I' rating and something larger, like the current Apple TV would have a 'III' rating for example, like how there were different sized ExpressCards.

    VESA has a DisplayPort standard that uses USB 3.1 for DP video, data, and power over the USB 3.1 plug interface.

    This way the living room and bedrooms can finally get updated, and those rooms can have the media displays that best suit their needs.


    * Calling them televisions seems too limiting in 2015.
    Ok, an external cable to a Ian stick is a big deal breaker. I like your alternative plan. It is definitely the long view but looking at the cable you reference it seems obvious. Externally powered connected devices makes no sense.
  • Reply 76 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,614member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    I thought 720p and 1080p purchase and rentals cost the same amount? What if 720p was the new SD cost?
    you mean if 1080 was the new SD cost? Sure, that would work. I am not sure there is a noticeable visual difference between 720 and 1080 on a 40" screen or smaller so you'd just be wasting bandwidth, but if 720 screens are disappearing there is not much point in delivering media in the format. I expect Apple has stats.
  • Reply 77 of 105
    Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

    "Hey Siri" is great ... but about 3x an hour Siri currently activates on my iPhone due to a similar combination of words broadcast over the TV when my iPhone is near it.

     

    Gosh dang it, I was keeping a list of instances where Siri would activate but I deleted it because “What’s the point? No one else will ever have that problem…” It’s not thrice a day, certainly, but.

  • Reply 78 of 105
    paxman wrote: »
    you mean if 1080 was the new SD cost? Sure, that would work. I am not sure there is a noticeable visual difference between 720 and 1080 on a 40" screen or smaller so you'd just be wasting bandwidth, but if 720 screens are disappearing there is not much point in delivering media in the format. I expect Apple has stats.

    No, I mean get rid of the current SD downloads, and replace them with 720p at the SD price, and then offer 1080p/H.264 and 4K/HEVC all at the same price. Or perhaps have a third price scale just for 4K/HEVC at $1 more, if the numbers call for it.
  • Reply 79 of 105
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,178member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    They work fine, but I find the solution lacking because they still need an external power source.

    What I'd like to see — and Apple could do it — is make a open standard connection that would allow the video, non-video data, and power to be delivered into media displays* that will be compatible between media displayvendors and digital media devices. This could be as simple as a stick, or be larger and more complex, but there would be an area on every participating media display that would support these devices. For something as simple as the stick it could a 'I' rating and something larger, like the current Apple TV would have a 'III' rating for example, like how there were different sized ExpressCards.

    VESA has a DisplayPort standard that uses USB 3.1 for DP video, data, and power over the USB 3.1 plug interface.

    This way the living room and bedrooms can finally get updated, and those rooms can have the media displays that best suit their needs.


    * Calling them televisions seems too limiting in 2015.

    Nice idea but the former would need too much industry buy in for little return and the latter limits the target market too much.

    Even when Apple adopted VESA MDP in MacBook Pros it got labelled proprietary. If they were going for the 4K market and other DP standards are powered, that could work.
  • Reply 80 of 105

    What he's talking about (though, may not know it) is, what will eventually become the next iteration of the iMac.

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