Apple now allowing marijuana-themed App Store downloads in 23 US states where drug is legal

Posted:
in iPhone edited February 2015
America's stance on marijuana is changing, and so too are Apple's App Store policies, as the iPhone maker has begun giving the greenlight to cannabis-related apps, provided they are accessed from a state where the drug has been legalized.




Apple's change was spotlighted on Friday by the makers of the app MassRoots, a social networking application for cannabis users. Apple has allowed MassRoots back into the App Store with a new mandatory geolocation check that will prevent users outside of authorized territories from accessing the network.

The change comes after the developers of MassRoots and other marijuana advocacy groups petitioned Apple to consider changing its stance on barring drug-themed applications from the App Store.

"We'd like to thank the App Store for embracing the cannabis community and continuing to set an example as a socially-progressive institution," the MassRoots team wrote. "We are excited to begin a new chapter with Apple in which we can work together to affect meaningful societal change."

With its acceptance into the App Store, the self-described "voice of the cannabis community" said it now has "a duty to show the world that cannabis consumption can be done in a safe and responsible manner in compliance" with the law. The developer said it plans to add new features and security measures that go beyond even Apple's requirements in the coming weeks.

Since the late 1990s, 23 U.S. states and Washington D.C. have legalized the sale and use of cannabis in one form or another, whether restricted to medical needs or for recreational use. The states where it is legal, and marijuana-related iOS apps should be accessible, are:
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • Oregon
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • Washington
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    "Marijuana" , although originally a Mexican folk name historically, became a pejorative term for Cannabis, popularised by the racist publisher William Randolph Hearst and used to demonize Cannabis and its users through his newspapers. The plant is called Cannabis.

    I understand you needed to grab eyeballs with the headline... at least you then use the correct term in the story..
  • Reply 2 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by argonaut View Post



    "Marijuana" , although originally a Mexican folk name historically, became a pejorative term for Cannabis, popularised by the racist publisher William Randolph Hearst and used to demonize Cannabis and its users through his newspapers. The plant is called Cannabis.



    I understand you needed to grab eyeballs with the headline... at least you then use the correct term in the story..



    Who cares

  • Reply 3 of 44
    argonaut wrote: »
    "Marijuana" , although originally a Mexican folk name historically, became a pejorative term for Cannabis, popularised by the racist publisher William Randolph Hearst and used to demonize Cannabis and its users through his newspapers. The plant is called Cannabis.

    I understand you needed to grab eyeballs with the headline... at least you then use the correct term in the story..
    The term is correct. If you want to debate the nomenclature using the term marijuana has become as ubiquitous as "Q-Tips" has become for "cotton swabs".

    As far as the App Store goes this is great particularly for patients like me who use marijuana for medicinal purposes.
  • Reply 4 of 44
    Let%u2019s start doing unto others as we would have them do unto us. None of us would want our kids put in jail over a little marijuana. None of us would want the police to confiscate and sell our parents' home because they grew a couple of plants to help with the aches and pains of growing older. Let's start treating other people the way we would want to be treated.

    This is up for debate right now in Georgia, so if that's you, email your Georgia House Representative:
    Go to the link
    http://www.house.ga.gov/Representatives/en-US/HouseMembersList.aspx
    click on their name to find their email address
    Email your Georgia State Senator:
    http://www.senate.ga.gov/senators/en-US/SenateMembersList.aspx
    These lists have a search engine; just type in your town and it will highlight your Representative and your Senator.
    Polite. Responsible. Friendly.
  • Reply 5 of 44
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Well Dr. Dre is on Apple's executive board so this comes with the territory that Apple would be peddling Mary Jane apps.
  • Reply 6 of 44
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,442member

    Who cares

    I found that interesting. That sort of thing has happened many times and happens now with words. The etymology of a word is often well worth knowing for a good understanding of historical and current values thus enabling a better perspective.
  • Reply 7 of 44
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,442member
    The term is correct. If you want to debate the nomenclature using the term marijuana has become as ubiquitous as "Q-Tips" has become for "cotton swabs".

    As far as the App Store goes this is great particularly for patients like me who use marijuana for medicinal purposes.

    All you say is true however Q-Tips , Kleenex etc., were not coined to change perception deliberately by some entity for its own deliberate agenda (although no doubt encouraged for marketing lol). If this is indeed the case here it is at least worth knowing.
  • Reply 8 of 44
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Hmmm did they really need to hire Dr. Dre for this?
  • Reply 9 of 44
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,442member
    cali wrote: »
    Hmmm did they really need to hire Dr. Dre for this?

    Two references now ... So .... is there some relevance / connection to 'Dr. Dre' and 'selling Cannabis related apps' I am unaware of?
  • Reply 10 of 44

    Who cares

    Details matter.
  • Reply 11 of 44
    Argonaut makes the common mistake of thinking that the original etymology of a word is the only correct meaning. In our language, most commonly used terms have changed meaning or gotten additional meanings over the centuries. That's the sign of a language that continues to grow and evolved.

    If this article was part of a botany class, than "Cannabis" would be the correct word to use. But for a general cultural discussion in a tech publication, "Marijuana" is the best word choice. So if you're gonna get all professorial on us, Argonaut, get your lesson right.
  • Reply 12 of 44
    Two references now ... So .... is there some relevance / connection to 'Dr. Dre' and 'selling Cannabis related apps' I am unaware of?

    You need to update your blocked posters filter perhaps?
  • Reply 13 of 44
    I find it a little strange Apple would limit the download or use of these apps by region. Why should it matter whether or not a particular state has legal cannibas? The app itself is not illegal. Seems a misstep, IMO.
  • Reply 14 of 44
    timt999 wrote: »
    Argonaut makes the common mistake of thinking that the original etymology of a word is the only correct meaning. In our language, most commonly used terms have changed meaning or gotten additional meanings over the centuries. That's the sign of a language that continues to grow and evolved.

    If this article was part of a botany class, than "Cannabis" would be the correct word to use. But for a general cultural discussion in a tech publication, "Marijuana" is the best word choice. So if you're gonna get all professorial on us, Argonaut, get your lesson right.

    I agree with Argonaut's view on this one. It's popularly called "medical marijuana" or "recreational marijuana", but those are lazy and uninformed descriptors.
  • Reply 15 of 44
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,442member
    You need to update your blocked posters filter perhaps?

    Oh update, I misread as unblock ... gotchya.
  • Reply 16 of 44

    Good to hear Apple is coming to their senses. Many of us QA guys at Apple in the early 90's used to smoke it on weekend work days, and sometimes you could smell it lingering in the bathrooms in the Mariani One building. Oh, the good old days. Some guys would say it helped them find more bugs, Didn't do the same for me, I just got scared a manager would catch on (paranoid) :-)

  • Reply 17 of 44
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    I find it a little strange Apple would limit the download or use of these apps by region. Why should it matter whether or not a particular state has legal cannibas? The app itself is not illegal. Seems a misstep, IMO.

    Just what I was thinking. They don't block books about cannabis in those states.
  • Reply 18 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    Why should it matter whether or not a particular state has legal cannibas? The app itself is not illegal. Seems a misstep, IMO.

     

    Apple plays the political game. They don't want to be accomplices to the failure of prohibition. They don't want to be a punching bag for politicians who are. Apple is allowing as much freedom as the voters of a particular region have chosen.

  • Reply 19 of 44
    roakeroake Posts: 668member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by argonaut View Post



    "Marijuana" , although originally a Mexican folk name historically, became a pejorative term for Cannabis, popularised by the racist publisher William Randolph Hearst and used to demonize Cannabis and its users through his newspapers. The plant is called Cannabis.



    I understand you needed to grab eyeballs with the headline... at least you then use the correct term in the story..

     

    Apparently, "Marijuana" worked to grab your eyeballs.  Besides, if you are going to stand on technicalities, it's not "Cannabis" but rather "Cannabis sativa".  Regardless of what it's called, I wouldn't endorse it.

  • Reply 20 of 44
    Perfect! Now we need to get the morons in Washington to get their heads out of their asses and declassify it as a dangerous drug equivelant to heroin.
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