Apple details Watch battery life, upgrades band selection page in online store

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited May 2015
In tandem with Friday's launch of the Apple Watch, Apple updated its website with details on the battery life of the device, and simultaneously updated its online store to make shopping for Watch bands easier to navigate.




On the Service and Recycling section of the company's Batteries page, Apple states that the Watch should hold 80 percent of its original capacity at 1,000 "complete" charge cycles -- meaning charging from empty to full. Typically, batteries last longer if they're only partially depleted before being recharged.

That performance is identical to iPads and MacBooks, though those devices have much greater starting capacities. By comparison, an iPhone is designed to retain 80 percent capacity at about 500 charge cycles, and iPods are expected to drop to that level around the 400-cycle mark.

A defective battery can be replaced for free under warranty coverage, including AppleCare+, but a swap otherwise costs $99 in the U.S., plus $7 in shipping.

The Online Apple Store now breaks bands into separate section. Previously bands were treated like any other accessory, which made finding the right type and size difficult.




The new band page is organized vertically, and split into sections according to type, such as the Sport band or the Milanese loop. Before selecting whether they have a 38mm or 42mm Watch, shoppers can choose which color they want, if options are available.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    ronm88ronm88 Posts: 11member
    I believe that out of warranty cost is $79 (plus $6.95 shipping if necessary):

    https://support.apple.com/kb/index?page=servicefaq&geo=United_States&product=applewatch&select=WARRANTY__PRICING
  • Reply 2 of 22
    Expect the horse and buggy crowd to show up here soon.
  • Reply 3 of 22
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Question for anyone who has their watch. Based on the picture above if the watch is charging with the digital crown resting on the table  is it inconvenient to press the buttons since the charging wire is pointing the other way? Not sure if I described that well enough but if there was a charging stand it would obviously be no problem. Can the wire point in any direction?

  • Reply 4 of 22
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    mstone wrote: »
    Question for anyone who has their watch. Based on the picture above if the watch is charging with the digital crown resting on the table  is it inconvenient to press the buttons since the charging wire is pointing the other way? Not sure if I described that well enough but if there was a charging stand it would obviously be no problem. Can the wire point in any direction?
    The laws of physics do not change with the orientation of the power cable. The charging disc magnetically attaches the back of the Watch. The relative orientation of the disc and the Watch back determine the magnetic flux that that links them. If they are attached and an AC current passes through the disc, then the Watch will be recharged. The orientation of the pair don't matter. Even if you twirled the pair over your head, the Watch would continue to charge so long it did not break free.
  • Reply 5 of 22
    booboobooboo Posts: 48member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    Question for anyone who has their watch. Based on the picture above if the watch is charging with the digital crown resting on the table  is it inconvenient to press the buttons since the charging wire is pointing the other way? Not sure if I described that well enough but if there was a charging stand it would obviously be no problem. Can the wire point in any direction?




    This would depend on whether you have a watch band that separates (e.g., sport band, leather bands) or a band that stays connected (link bracelet, milanese loop) when you take off the watch.

     

    I have a sport band. The charging puck lays flat on my dresser, shiny side up, so I can just set the Apple Watch on it, watch face up, with the sport band pieces extending out from the watch and laying flat on the dresser. The digital crown doesn't rest on the table, and the charging wire doesn't obstruct access to the buttons or get tangled with the watch band pieces. The charging wire can point in any direction.

     

    I don't have one of the stays-connected bands, but I guess one would have to attach the charging puck and set down the watch so it rests on the band with the puck inside, watch face up.

  • Reply 6 of 22
    You can also buy one of these nifty lamps from IKEA. Inductive charging is built-in to the lamp base. Just set your watch on the lamp base at night. Boom. No charging cable needed.

    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/70280709/
  • Reply 7 of 22
    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.
  • Reply 8 of 22
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.
    You are not missing anything. The production costs of any model ?Watch is a tiny fraction of its sales price. Apple appears to have spared no expense in designing and engineering the finest wearable computer on the planet. I think that one of the reasons that it could do this is that the watch market permits such high margins that Apple is virtually certain to recoup its development costs in relatively short order.

    This is the other thing--for all of the caterwauling about the price of the ?Watch Edition, the traditional luxury watch market operates on very high margins. There are many models in the price range between the Sport and the SS Watch. There are many others in the range between the SS Watch and the Edition. There are also numerous models priced above the Edition. There are watches that priced at $350,000. That $350k watch has no precious stones. All it does is tell time. Its price is 20 times that of the most expensive Edition configuration.

    This is also more expensive than the homes that most Americans live in. It is more expensive than most luxury automobiles. However, these are the prices that luxury watchmakers charge. These are the prices that luxury watch customers are willing to pay.
  • Reply 9 of 22
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post



    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.

    Perhaps however the material is remarkably silky smooth and feels very luxurious. Most unlike any plastic I have ever seen or touched.

  • Reply 10 of 22
    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.

    Econ 101 price is set at what the market will bear, cost of manufacture has no bearing on the price.
  • Reply 11 of 22
    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.

    If so, and if the customer is willing to pay $50, yea for me, as a shareholder!
  • Reply 12 of 22
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    longfang wrote: »
    Econ 101 price is set at what the market will bear, cost of manufacture has no bearing on the price.

    This principle is true and cuts eloquently through all the babble regarding the pricing of the Apple Watch.
  • Reply 13 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,623member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post





    This principle is true and cuts eloquently through all the babble regarding the pricing of the Apple Watch.

     

    Well, while that's true, there is a link between the manufacturing cost and the product cost. But, a backward one.

     

    You establish what the market (important to determine market's scope) is ready to pay, how much it will buy (often with different volume/pricing scenarios, and the chances they'll occur) for a product of X quality from your company (what the market will bear) and then try to determine if you can produce it while keeping a minimum margin (which depends on many many company factors).

     

    Of course, in the case of a new product. All of this is very difficult; what will the market bear when no similar product exists?

    Apple has more latitude than most because of its financial and brand strength to test the water on pricing and not get bitten.

     

    Anyway, If there is no way to produce a product at any cost and make a reliable profit (because there is too much uncertainty in the sales forecast, or there are more efficient producers, or producers with better pricing power), well companies should not do it!

     

    You'd be surprised how often companies seemingly don't run realistic scenarios and go blindly into R&D and even production... Appalling.

    That often occurs when competitive pressure is high. The Samsung S5 last year was really terrible and nobody knows what Samsung was really thinking when they made it!

  • Reply 14 of 22
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,007member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post



    Maybe I am missing part of the big picture, but it look nigh on impossible for Apple to spend more than one buck in China manufacturing that sports band.



    Thats right, its called a ripoff.

     

    For anyone interested in the quality of the AWatch: http://www.theverge.com/a/apple-watch-review

  • Reply 15 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,623member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by knowitall View Post

     



    Thats right, its called a ripoff.

     

    For anyone interested in the quality of the AWatch: http://www.theverge.com/a/apple-watch-review


     

    Right... The only mildly negative review, from someone who is a demonstrated clown who got his ass handed to him by reporters, who had handled the watch for mere minutes.  You can google that if you want to see the dolt's idiocy in technicolor.

  • Reply 16 of 22
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,007member
    foggyhill wrote: »
    Right... The only mildly negative review, from someone who is a demonstrated clown who got his ass handed to him by reporters, who had handled the watch for mere minutes.  You can google that if you want to see the dolt's idiocy in technicolor.

    I wouldn't call that mildly negative.
    His comments made a lot of sense, when you search the web this review is one of the first to hit.
    I would expect Apple to sue 'this clown' when what you claim is true (did you read the review by the way?)

    Edit: other reviews mention the points he mention as well and the verge is also quoted in this overview (like it is in several others): http://www.macrumors.com/2015/04/08/apple-watch-review-roundup/ (the reviews are critical to say it mildly). So backup your claim and show me respectable sites with proven comments (not tabloid rumors) about his review.
  • Reply 17 of 22
    The weirdest part is that competitors accept normal straps whilst Apple will sell you their proprietary leather for more than competitors watches can be had.

    Yes, can be had, you have been. Surely Tim Jobs must have shares in Monster Cables.
  • Reply 18 of 22
    luinilluinil Posts: 59member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post



    The weirdest part is that competitors accept normal straps whilst Apple will sell you their proprietary leather for more than competitors watches can be had.



    Yes, can be had, you have been. Surely Tim Jobs must have shares in Monster Cables.

     

    The proprietary format for the straps has some advantages for the used : easier to change by yourself and there is no easy to break pin connecting it to the watch case (on all my watches I would have to replace a pin a least once a year). 

  • Reply 19 of 22
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post



    The weirdest part is that competitors accept normal straps whilst Apple will sell you their proprietary leather for more than competitors watches can be had.



    Yes, can be had, you have been. Surely Tim Jobs must have shares in Monster Cables.



    Right cause only Apple sells expensive leather straps /s

     

    A while back my dad had his Ulysse Nardin serviced and part of that included changing the strap for USD 500 (in addition to the service cost which was another 500). If the customer feels that the price charged is fair for them than its fair. It may not be for you but don't presume to suggest that others with more disposable income might find the price acceptable.

  • Reply 20 of 22
    chasmchasm Posts: 570member
    Apple has been doing some really interesting work in "plastic" of late. The feel of the iPhone 5c was really remarkable. I'm looking forward to trying out the new band, and have heard reports from friends that it feels really nice.
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