Amid rumors of an Apple buyout, Nokia's maps business shines in otherwise disappointing quarter

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 28
    geospatial wrote: »
    Map Data is just as important as the data that is collected from how we use it.  It seems that Apple no longer wants to pay the price that Google exacts for the use of the Map Data and feels that it can make the user experience better if it controls the resource that drives that opportunity.

    Overall, I agree with you, however I don't think "cost" was the reason Apple cut ties to Google - Apple is distancing itself from feeding its most intense competitor data collector of Apple's customers. Google has shown a total disregard for other companies, Apple is stronger for not relying on anything from Google.
  • Reply 22 of 28
    tokyojimutokyojimu Posts: 417member
    agramonte wrote: »
    More money to fix a stupid move. Just scrap all this nonsense and just bake Google Maps back in.
    Their egos won't allow it, unfortunately. This is one of those cases where Apple did _not_ do what is in the best interests of their customers; instead preferring to "go thermonuclear" on Google to make a statement.
  • Reply 23 of 28
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post





    In smart person world, Youd realize Apple doesn't sell their mapping app. So where is the profit going to come from? image



    And not ONE analyst is worth listening to.

     

    But Nokia does, through (if I remember correctly) their Navteq data which lots of auto manufacturers use. If Apple bought HERE I doubt they'd suddenly cut off licensing to those automakers.

     

    Think about Apple and Rockstar. Lots of the Nortel patents were currently being licensed, and one of the conditions of the sale was that existing deals would not be disrupted. Which means that Apple (and the other members of Rockstar) would be collecting licensing fees that companies using the Nortel patents would be paying.

     

    I don't see why Apple couldn't continue to make money off the automakers while also incorporating the additional data into their own product. Apple already owns several SEP's and currently licenses many of those patents. While Apple likes to keep a lot of their technology to themselves, they are also willing to license some out under certain circumstances.

  • Reply 24 of 28

    I hope Apple buys Nokia Here.

    I am not sure how all the bits and pieces will fit in but I know that the international map's data and teams will be a huge boost to Apple Maps.  First class maps worldwide is crucial to iOS devices, CarPlay, OS X etc... and it will only become more important over time.

  • Reply 25 of 28
    gtbuzzgtbuzz Posts: 129member
    I don't see that it would be worth 3.2B to Apple. That would buy a lot of mapping vehicles. I think they had the right idea when they were compiling information from iPhones - they were creating maps - not spying on users. Nokia could keep their Maps app for that price. Apple has better use for the money.
  • Reply 26 of 28
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Geospatial View Post

     

    Map Data is just as important as the data that is collected from how we use it.  It seems that Apple no longer wants to pay the price that Google exacts for the use of the Map Data and feels that it can make the user experience better if it controls the resource that drives that opportunity.

     

    Google slapped Nokia hard when they took away the data collection technology that was used for the "True Project" by acquiring "510" who built the collection systems for them.  That is why Nokia purchased Earthmine which is the underlining technology in the Here vehicles.  I believe that all of the major players in this realm know what the other guys are doing.  Between Google, Microsoft, Nokia, and Apple, there are hundreds of these mapping systems driving around the globe.  The answer to their effort has many outcomes that all of them feel has value to their platforms.  Certainly the personal mobile device experience is key result but they are also creating data, if processed correctly, that can be used as an autonomous vehicle base map.  Several of these organizations are counting on this data to give them a foot in the door to the autonomous vehicle market.




    Thank you for your insights, very interesting! As a consumer all I really want is for Apple to do something like Flyover but at the street level, which is what NAVTEQ seems to have pioneered if I'm not mistaken. If Apple can do this without HERE, I don't see a big reason for HERE to be purchased (except possibly for non-US data). Do you think there would be any licensing/IP conflicts? Perhaps not, as Apple's implementation seems to be a significant improvement (and/or change) from the original NAVTEQ tech by Apple placing two spacial scanners on each mapping rig, as well as the 45 degree inclination, as DA pointed out.

  • Reply 27 of 28
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Here Drive is pretty much native navigation software on Nokia/Microsoft Lumia phones. I'm not even aware that there are other comparable solution on Windows Phone platform.

    I'd be surprised if Microsoft doesn't try to buy this.They need it more than Apple.
  • Reply 28 of 28
    Frankly I'm puzzled by how the car manufacturers can accept CarPlay in their cars despite the disappointing performance of Apple Maps. It makes every sense for Apple to buy Here if they are serious with CarPlay.
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