This week on AppleInsider: Apple's blockbuster Q2, 'tattoo-gate,' Apple Watch review, more

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2015
The week began with a financial bang, as Apple published the results of its record-breaking second quarter, but later saw controversies swirl with Apple Watch production obstacles and problems for wearers with tattoos. AppleInsider meanwhile reviewed the device, finding it attractive but saddled with some flaws.


Apple reaps $13.6 billion in second-quarter results

On Monday Apple announced $58 billion in revenue and $13.6 billion in net profits for the March-quarter, driven mostly by sales of 61.17 million iPhones. iPad sales were down, though, meaning Macs actually eclipsed the tablet in terms of revenue.

Apple simulatenously added another $50 billion to its capital return program, with the goal of reaching $200 billion in dividends and stock buybacks by March 2017. Some other announcements included the goal of bringing the Apple Watch to more countries in June, and Best Buy launching support for Apple Pay despite being allied with rival mobile payment service MCX.

'Tattoo-gate' finds Apple Watch fooled by ink




Tuesday saw complaints from Watch owners who reported that their tattoos were disrupting operation of the device's optical sensors, causing problems with notifications, heart rate tracking, and even unlocking. Apple confirmed the problem on a support page, noting that the "ink, pattern, and saturation of some tattoos" can block light.

Some of the issues can be solved by disabling wrist detection, but this also disables Apple Pay, and forces users to track their heart rate with a separate Bluetooth accessory.

Apple Watch review: Beautiful but rough




Our review found that the Watch has new and intuitive interface technologies, and great hardware design, including both the device itself and its many band options. The Watch implementation of Apple Pay was described as convenient and futuristic.

At the same time the wearable scored only 3.5 out of 5 stars, owing to slow third-party apps, an awkward companion app on the iPhone, and troubles with Siri and Passbook. The device also lacks any support for third-party watchfaces, despite Apple's nominal focus on personalization.

Watch rollout slowed by defective Taptic Engine parts




The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday that low shipments of the Watch might be traceable to faulty Taptic Engine motors built by AAC Technologies. Though none of the parts are believed to have reached the public, the manufacturing speed bump allegedly forced Apple to shift most Taptic Engine production to its second supplier, Nidec.

Apple has reportedly told various Watch parts suppliers to slow production until June to account for the slowdown. It remains to be seen how that will affect Apple's hopes of launching the product in more countries next month, or plans to offer walk-in purchases at Apple Stores.

Developers get early access to App Analytics




For developers, Apple began rolling out a beta of App Analytics. The tool lets people track performance metrics for App Store titles without having to turn to third-party services, which may charge a fee and/or use indirect data sources.

Access to the beta is being granted on a first-come-first-served basis. Developers can apply through iTunes Connect.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,223member
    I've got two words for those even mentioning this ridiculous tattoo thing. Tattoo Ablation.

    I do feel badly for those with naturally dark blue skin though.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    Apple products aren't for everyone. Sometimes life choices preclude other choices.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    westhawk39westhawk39 Posts: 12member
    I got my watch in the mail Thursday April 30 (central canada) and am happier than a pig in shit.

    I don't see anything rough about the watch. Works beautifully. I'm one to notice when things are a little slow but haven't felt this way once. It's by far my favourite Apple product ever. It's so good if I had a tattoo I would laser remove a small patch on my wrist so things would work properly. I mean it's not like your ever not going to have this thing on!
  • Reply 4 of 18
    gtbuzzgtbuzz Posts: 129member

    The watch is a great product that will improve over time  - over time is key.  As a retired engineer, I would like to say that Apple does everything possible to consider all things that will cause a problem - nothing is perfect.   Instrumentation will improve over time - it always has.  It is a small miracle to be able to have a device this powerful on your wrist.  It is not a  Star-Trek Communicator and the next couple of interactions will be better than the first.  Just like the iPhones have improved and the Macs have improved.  Honda & Toyota have improved.  

     

    Unfortunately, the Chinese dropped the ball on their part of the watch. That caused the Japanese to get the $ for the taptic engine of the watch.

     

    The thing that disturbs me most about technology is that we currently live in a small town in the SE USA.  The VZ cell signal and reliability is terrible.  The Internet latency is too high, even if you have the speed you need (Vyve Cable and Windstream DSL).  We just don't have the bandwidth or signal strength to take full advantage of the products.  Our next move will not only include house requirement, medical requirements, but technology requirements - Over the Air TV, LTE and beyond, reasonable cost internet.  When it gets down to it, communications costs more than electricity.  Maybe one of those Facebook or Google satellites can bring us some better service.  

  • Reply 5 of 18
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,758member
    danielsw wrote: »
    Apple products aren't for everyone. Sometimes life choices preclude other choices.

    Next: #Zombiegate. The Watch features don't work if it fails to detect a living pulse.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,065member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    I've got two words for those even mentioning this ridiculous tattoo thing. Tattoo Ablation.



    I do feel badly for those with naturally dark blue skin though.



    I’ve actually seen someone with Argyria (blue skin) . They were convinced that colloidal silver has some healing properties and basically overdosed on it. But that’s not natural.

     

    Now if African Americans were reporting the same issues then we would actually have a problem. But they’re not so we don’t.

     

    On a similar subject my wife and Touch ID don’t mix. She scans her fingerprint, it works for a few days and then stops working. She tried all the fixes suggested to no avail. My son and I even went so far as to scan our fingerprints into her iPhone 6 as a test. Guess what? Months later our fingerprints still work without fail. Hers don’t. I can only conclude that there’s something about her skin, skin oil, body chemistry, something that screws up TouchID for her.

  • Reply 7 of 18
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 718member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    I've got two words for those even mentioning this ridiculous tattoo thing. Tattoo Ablation.



    I do feel badly for those with naturally dark blue skin though.



    Naturally dark blue skin may actually be a sign of iron toxicity such as with excessive iron storage in the disease hemochromatosis.

     

    It also may be a sign of silver toxicity.  Those who take colloidal silver, for example, eventually turn their skin permanently blue.

  • Reply 8 of 18
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 718member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post



    Apple products aren't for everyone. Sometimes life choices preclude other choices.



    Agree, whole heartedly.

     

    Many people can't afford Apple products.

  • Reply 9 of 18
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,223member
    lkrupp wrote: »

    I’ve actually seen someone with Argyria (blue skin) . They were convinced that colloidal silver has some healing properties and basically overdosed on it. But that’s not natural.

    Now if African Americans were reporting the same issues then we would actually have a problem. But they’re not so we don’t.

    On a similar subject my wife and Touch ID don’t mix. She scans her fingerprint, it works for a few days and then stops working. She tried all the fixes suggested to no avail. My son and I even went so far as to scan our fingerprints into her iPhone 6 as a test. Guess what? Months later our fingerprints still work without fail. Hers don’t. I can only conclude that there’s something about her skin, skin oil, body chemistry, something that screws up TouchID for her.

    Alien maybe? ;)
  • Reply 10 of 18
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,223member
    jameskatt2 wrote: »

    Naturally dark blue skin may actually be a sign of iron toxicity such as with excessive iron storage in the disease hemochromatosis.

    It also may be a sign of silver toxicity.  Those who take colloidal silver, for example, eventually turn their skin permanently blue.

    In my experience hemochromatosis turns skin bronze color not blue but certainly, silver poisoning does. I wonder if Apple tested these kind of conditions with an ?Watch?

    Whatever, i was sincere when i said I felt bad for anyone with a skin condition rather than a tattoo that prevented the ?Watch working, especially when an ?Watch can aid with medical monitoring.
  • Reply 11 of 18

    'ArmGate' Apple has made yet another blunder. People without arms are complaining that Apple Watch doesn't work for people without arms.

     

    Waiting in the wings is 'ComatoseGate', people without consciousness are preparing a legal suit against Apple for not making the Apple Watch function for them.

     

    PocketGate is also looming with people who want the Apple Watch to work and give them all their biometrics with the product in their pocket.

     

    'InsideWristGate' where people want to wear the Apple Watch on the inside of their wrists and find that the Watch doesn't work reliably.

     

    LooseGate is a growing problem for people who want to wear their Apple Watches loosely on their wrists and then complain that the biometrics won't work properly without being in contact with the wrist.

  • Reply 12 of 18
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,772member

    I think the reviews are holding Apple to a standard that other companies aren't held to with relation to their watches. Apple clearly has the best watch in the field without question. I'm not sure why they are held to a much higher standard than is realistic given the available options on the market. The same thing goes for The Verge review and that's partly why the reviewer got his own comments thrown back up in his face. His reviewing was biased and not based on the available technology on the market. They were based on what he wants the Apple Watch to be technological limitations and comparisons with other smart watches on the market be damned. I don't think that's fair. 

     

    Secondly, I don't think the apps being native will make them much faster than they already are if at all given the fact that most of what people are waiting on is data to comeback from the app creators. That's not something you can resolve with making an app native. That is something that is lost on even Apple Insider staff. 

  • Reply 13 of 18
    pfisherpfisher Posts: 758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post

     

    I think the reviews are holding Apple to a standard that other companies aren't held to with relation to their watches. Apple clearly has the best watch in the field without question. I'm not sure why they are held to a much higher standard than is realistic given the available options on the market. The same thing goes for The Verge review and that's partly why the reviewer got his own comments thrown back up in his face. His reviewing was biased and not based on the available technology on the market. They were based on what he wants the Apple Watch to be technological limitations and comparisons with other smart watches on the market be damned. I don't think that's fair. 

     

    Secondly, I don't think the apps being native will make them much faster than they already are if at all given the fact that most of what people are waiting on is data to comeback from the app creators. That's not something you can resolve with making an app native. That is something that is lost on even Apple Insider staff. 


    Best watch in their own category. Which is easy since they define the category.

  • Reply 14 of 18
    mathuemathue Posts: 7member
    Yahknow. Watergate was WAY back in 1972, 'gate' really needs to be retired.

    The next time it comes up, Apple Insider needs to show some fortitude and not parrot it again just become someone before did.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,223member
    mathue wrote: »
    Yahknow. Watergate was WAY back in 1972, 'gate' really needs to be retired.

    The next time it comes up, Apple Insider needs to show some fortitude and not parrot it again just become someone before did.

    Yes you have a point, I'd suggest someone did ... 'A Microsoft" or a 'Samsung', meaning a total f*** up and the did 'a Google' meaning a backstabbing or stealing of IP.
  • Reply 16 of 18
    libdemlibdem Posts: 36member

    "Tattogate" does not exist.The watch does what it is supposed to do.It works for all type of skin colors.What it does not do is work properly when your skin is not in direct contact with the watch(because of ink for example).

    I fail to see how that is a failure of Apple or its engineering team.

  • Reply 17 of 18
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    libdem wrote: »
    "Tattogate" does not exist.The watch does what it is supposed to do.It works for all type of skin colors.What it does not do is work properly when your skin is not in direct contact with the watch(because of ink for example).
    I fail to see how that is a failure of Apple or its engineering team.

    Agreed. Exactly how many people are affected? Not nearly enough to worry about. Worst case would be a class action lawsuit, one without precedent.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    ecatsecats Posts: 272member

    Since we've seen that not all dark tattoos have issues, the predominant theory is that certain inks are likely causing the problem.

     

    I really do feel badly for these people, but at the same time, I don't support the idea that this is something that apple should have better prepared for, the watch already has features for people which can not use the wrist detection or heart rate monitor features. (e.g. a person with heavy scarring can turn off wrist detection and pair the watch with a 3rd party bluetooth HR monitor.)

     

    The idea that this is a common problem is obviously false, such tattoos are rare and for the very few people who happen to be effected by this have a range of options, such as using their other wrist, turning off the wrist detection feature/using a chest strap HR monitor, or finally simply returning the product to apple for a refund.

     

    Perhaps apple will utilise different or additional technologies in the future. However it's possible that they may be able to counter part of this with a software update.

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