Latest OS X beta ditches buggy discoveryd DNS service, replaced with mDNSResponder

Posted:
in macOS edited May 2015
In an apparent effort to fix DNS errors seen in recent OS X 10.10 versions, Apple's latest Yosemite beta shows the buggy discoveryd service replaced with mDNSResponder, a process last implemented in OS X 10.9 Mavericks.


Source: Apple Support Communities userrwross1776


With the OS X 10.10.4 beta, released on Tuesday, Apple reinstated mDNSResponder to handle DNS processes previously assigned to discoveryd since the debut of OS X 10.10 Yosemite.

As reported by ArsTechnica earlier this year, discovered discoveryd would repeatedly fail to resolve device names, duplicate machine names and cause other network problems that led to general system slowdowns. The process was also attributed to various Wi-Fi issues.

The discoveryd service was thought to be linked with Handoff functionality, which debuted alongside Yosemite and iOS 8, but those features appear to be operational even with the transfer to mDNSResponder.

It is not clear if Apple plans to permanently fall back to mDNSResponsder when OS X 10.10.4 launches, or is merely using the older service as a stopgap solution as it works to fix discoveryd.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    From the reports I've seen discoveryd should never have been shipped. Glad to see someone's finally admitted the issue.
  • Reply 2 of 25
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,065member
    Holy crap Batman, I am now seeing over 50 wifi routers from our neighborhood, I saw 4 before this update!

    EDIT ... oops I forgot the /joke tag! :)
  • Reply 3 of 25
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    http://furbo.org/2015/05/05/discoveryd-clusterfuck/

    Here's some detail as to why it was a mess. Sorry for the language.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,554member
    This really isn't surprising. Apple has never given networking the attention it needs. I managed a post house full of Macs, Xserves, Linux machines and PCs. While networking on the Macs < generally > was okay, there were problems. Particularly as Apple "improved" things by dropping Samba. We kept things very simple with all Macs running in an admin account. We did not use Active Directory until I tried using the Xserves to host some Wiki stuff. That was fun.

    Anyway the point is when Apple began to empower Macs to interface with the rest of the computer world, they did not do their usual high quality work. It's almost like the OS people don't like to be bothered with all that networking stuff, and they end up hiring people who can't do the job. Or they are not allowed to do the job. Imagine if Apple decided to make their networking top notch and hired the best and brightest out there. It would certainly help them out in the business world - both for Macs and iOS. At this juncture we can only assume they either don't hire well, or don't budget well for networking in OS development.
  • Reply 5 of 25
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,805member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post



    This really isn't surprising.

     

    It’s amazing how this jerkwater, douchebag outfit stays in business isn’t it.

  • Reply 6 of 25
    sandorsandor Posts: 419member
    Apple "dropped" Samba because the Samba team decided to adopt a more strict open source licensing which disallowed its use in commercial software.

    http://m.slashdot.org/story/149406

    Apple was forced to drop Samba.
  • Reply 7 of 25
    dugbugdugbug Posts: 283member
    sandor wrote: »
    Apple "dropped" Samba because the Samba team decided to adopt a more strict open source licensing which disallowed its use in commercial software.

    http://m.slashdot.org/story/149406

    Apple was forced to drop Samba.

    Ya that gpl3 really poisons the well. We dropped tons of stuff due to it.
  • Reply 8 of 25
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member

    Will this help with iOS devices repeatedly failing to appear when using iTunes Wi-Fi sync?

  • Reply 9 of 25
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,713member

    For every blogger who criticized Iljitsch van Beijnum for his Ars article on reverting back to mDNSResponder in Yosemite, I hope that crow tastes good.

  • Reply 10 of 25
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    welshdog wrote: »
    This really isn't surprising. Apple has never given networking the attention it needs. I managed a post house full of Macs, Xserves, Linux machines and PCs. While networking on the Macs < generally > was okay, there were problems. Particularly as Apple "improved" things by dropping Samba. We kept things very simple with all Macs running in an admin account. We did not use Active Directory until I tried using the Xserves to host some Wiki stuff. That was fun.

    Anyway the point is when Apple began to empower Macs to interface with the rest of the computer world, they did not do their usual high quality work. It's almost like the OS people don't like to be bothered with all that networking stuff, and they end up hiring people who can't do the job. Or they are not allowed to do the job. Imagine if Apple decided to make their networking top notch and hired the best and brightest out there. It would certainly help them out in the business world - both for Macs and iOS. At this juncture we can only assume they either don't hire well, or don't budget well for networking in OS development.

    So in your esteemed opinion, which OS has the easiest and most stable "and secure" networking stack?

    Edit: to add between the "".
  • Reply 11 of 25
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 4,960member
    So I run Yosemite on 3 machines, and my family on many more. I've been running Yosemite since the betas. If this system is so horrible and buggy, how come I have experienced ZERO issues relating to this?
  • Reply 12 of 25
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,148moderator
    Slowing down the OS releases going forward would be a good idea. Between not patching old versions:

    http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/185686/update-your-mac-apple-fixes-major-flaw-in-os-x-yosemite-but-wont-patch-lion-mountain-lion-or-mavericks

    and not fixing new ones until 6 months+ after release, it leaves people choosing between two bad options. Having reliable networking is essential in a modern OS. By the time this update is out, they will be at WWDC talking about 10.11. They added over 200 features to Yosemite:

    https://www.apple.com/osx/all-features/

    The updates are free so it's not like they need to make a new OS compelling to upgrade to any more. The same goes for iOS. They can launch an OS at WWDC, have a 3 month beta period then deploy it and patch it over another 3-6 months when they find issues, then skip a year and that allows a user to have a stable OS for 18-21 months before the next beta starts.

    There seemed to be a lot of changes after Forstall left 2-3 years ago but those have been done now so hopefully it will slow down.
    slurpy wrote:
    If this system is so horrible and buggy, how come I have experienced ZERO issues relating to this?

    Bugs don't affect everyone the same way. People have a whole range of wireless hardware and environments.
  • Reply 13 of 25
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,805member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post



    So I run Yosemite on 3 machines, and my family on many more. I've been running Yosemite since the betas. If this system is so horrible and buggy, how come I have experienced ZERO issues relating to this?



    My sentiments exactly. Same here with no issues whatsoever in my home network. Obviously the issue is real if Apple is making this change and the complaints are numerous.

  • Reply 14 of 25
    asciiascii Posts: 5,456member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by John.B View Post

     

    For every blogger who criticized Iljitsch van Beijnum for his Ars article on reverting back to mDNSResponder in Yosemite, I hope that crow tastes good.


    Yes, companies need a feedback loop with their customers to stay healthy. There are some on this board who shout down any criticism, mistakenly thinking they are helping Apple.

  • Reply 15 of 25
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,065member
    slurpy wrote: »
    So I run Yosemite on 3 machines, and my family on many more. I've been running Yosemite since the betas. If this system is so horrible and buggy, how come I have experienced ZERO issues relating to this?

    Same here. I did see that issue of being issued new device names early on but it was fixed by an early developer version that was not long after released to the public. I am using all Apple gear, routers included. Perhaps non Apple routers still had an issue, hard to know.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    slurpy wrote: »
    So I run Yosemite on 3 machines, and my family on many more. I've been running Yosemite since the betas. If this system is so horrible and buggy, how come I have experienced ZERO issues relating to this?

    Probably because you only run Yosemite? It seems like when people attach something besides 10.10 or 8.3 to their network the whole thing pukes.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but this worries me. Running Mavericks, my 2012 mac mini lost wifi every time it went to sleep. (I just resorted to turning it off after each use). Yosemite fixed the issue. I hope this 'fix' doesn't cause my old problems to resurface.
  • Reply 18 of 25
    jasenj1jasenj1 Posts: 894member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     



    My sentiments exactly. Same here with no issues whatsoever in my home network. Obviously the issue is real if Apple is making this change and the complaints are numerous.


     

    Yawn. Try putting your Macs in an environment with several thousand machines in a mixed Windows, Mac, Linux, and who knows what else environment with Active Directory, proxies, firewalls, VPN, etc.

     

    Since upgrading to 10.10 myself and many others in my company have been having networking problems with our Macs. These are problems we never had with 10.9 or earlier.

     

    Or maybe you cited a trivial example with no problems as sarcasm?

  • Reply 19 of 25
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,065member
    txcherokee wrote: »
    I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but this worries me. Running Mavericks, my 2012 mac mini lost wifi every time it went to sleep. (I just resorted to turning it off after each use). Yosemite fixed the issue. I hope this 'fix' doesn't cause my old problems to resurface.

    You probably know all this but if not here's a useful tip. These days if you have an large fast external drive you can make a disk sparseimage of your boot drive very quickly using Carbon Copy Cloner. I have a 2 TB external with images of six different boot volumes from MBPs and a Mac Pro. Should you need to restore you can use this as a back up of where you were. Far faster than using Time machine. You just mount the Mac to be restored using Target mode on another Mac and use the sparseimage as the source to clone back.

    Then you can test out a new update and see if it is OK with no worries. I did this last night for my Mac Pro but so far the new dev update seems fine.
  • Reply 20 of 25
    miltenbmiltenb Posts: 6member
    I can't wait. WiFi has been horrible with 10.10.x.
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