Adobe announces next generation Creative Cloud 2015 with Adobe Stock images platform

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2015
Adobe on Tuesday announced the 2015 release of Creative Cloud, the company's comprehensive graphic design offering, with 15 new desktop app versions, integrated sync technology and a stock image monetization platform called Adobe Stock.




Building off an already strong base of OS X and iOS apps, Adobe Creative Cloud 2015 is largely a collection of backend enhancements targeting performance, better cross-platform syncing and a few new tools. Adobe is also releasing a number of mobile apps for Google's Android operating system.

Unlike last year's CC offering, which marked a whole-hearted shift to the cloud, Adobe's 2015 version is all about polishing existing features.

For example, marquee brand Photoshop is getting Healing Brush and Path tools that render some 120 times faster when compared to CS6. Both Photoshop and Lightroom are adding automatic haze removal tools to their already well-equipped palettes, as well as support for compositing HDR images from multiple photos.




To facilitate its vision of a unified experience, Adobe is introducing a service called CreativeSync that dynamically transfers files, fonts, metadata, settings and more to a central repository before pushing it out to CC-connected apps. Akin to Apple's Continuity feature, CC users can start a project on Mac, then switch over to an on-the-go workflow on iPad or iPhone.

Cross-platform syncing is a tentpole feature for CC 2015, taken further by Linked Assets in Creative Cloud Libraries. Photoshop is a prime example of Adobe's work toward a unified experience, with mobile apps Photoshop Sketch, Photoshop Mix, Comp CC, Brush CC, Shape CC and Color CC all working together seamlessly with the desktop version of Photoshop. With apps drawing from the same CC libraries, any edits made to a file in one app automatically appear on other platforms, ensuring a persistent experience across multiple devices.

Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, Premier Pro and After Effects also feature Linked Assets as well as speed boosts compared to CS6. Other apps with updates include Dreamweaver, Muse and Flash Pro.

Adobe Stock




Introduced with CC 2015 is Adobe Stock, a stock photo marketplace built directly into Creative Cloud and its corresponding apps.

Adobe found a large majority of artists who market their wares through stock photo services use Adobe software like Photoshop to prepare images for sale. Adobe Stock is an attempt to cut out the middleman and offer purchases directly from Adobe's apps.

Launching the Stock interface from a CC app like Photoshop lets users search and browse marketplace images. Each photo comes with detailed information, including size, format and creator, as well as proper watermarking for fraud prevention. Saving a photo syncs a watermarked version to a user's Creative Cloud Library, which can then be dragged into a Photoshop file for placement.

Stock comes with a preview feature allowing users to add layer effects and tweaks to an lower resolution image prior to purchase. Once an image is licensed, the preview image is replaced with a high-resolution version with all effects applied automatically.

Pricing and availability

Creative Cloud

Creative Cloud prices are mostly unchanged from last year, with monthly fees varying depending on the application or suite being purchased:

The Creative Cloud Photography Plan is priced at $9.99 per month and includes Photoshop CC and Lightroom for desktop, mobile and Web.

Single apps come in at $19.99 per month with an annual commitment, except for Adobe Muse and Acrobat Pro DC, which are priced at $14.99. Fees include a ProSite portfolio website, access to Typekit desktop and web fonts and 20GB of cloud storage. Prepaid annual and monthly plans are also available.

Finally, Creative Cloud Complete comes in at $49.99 per month with an annual subscription. Other options for students, educators and businesses are outlined on Adobe's website.

Adobe Stock

Adobe Stock images can be purchased for $9.99 per image or as part of two tiered subscription models. Users pay a monthly fee of $49.99 for access to ten images per month, or $29.99 when a subscription is purchased alongside a Creative Cloud plan, while a more comprehensive tier comes in at $199.99 per month for access of up to 750 images.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 103
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    No rentware for me.
  • Reply 2 of 103
    And do their apps use full screen mode on the Mac yet?

    I just sold my 2013 rMBP 15" and am waiting for my new 2015 model to arrive so I can't really check myself just at the moment
  • Reply 3 of 103
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,055member
    And do their apps use full screen mode on the Mac yet?
    .
    I just sold my 2013 rMBP 15" and am waiting for my new 2015 model to arrive so I can't really check myself just at the moment

    Adobe apps have run full screen since the 90's.

    Little toggle buttons at the bottom of the main tool palette in Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
  • Reply 4 of 103
    ecatsecats Posts: 272member
    It would be impossible for me to enumerate how poorly written Adobe software titles are. The faults are too long to mention but has spawned entire websites dedicated to listing the faults in their software. (such as www.dearadobe.com)

    I understand that adobe's titles are so long in the tooth now that no one there has actually ever touched the old code, but with their switch to a subscription model and a near total absence of real competitors, now is the time for them to drop the feature-pumping and actually rewrite old code to modern standards. We desperately need an Adobe Mountain Lion/Snow Leopard/El Capitan.
  • Reply 5 of 103
    polymnia wrote: »
    Adobe apps have run full screen since the 90's.

    Little toggle buttons at the bottom of the main tool palette in Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign

    yeah nah, I guess you don't use a Mac and so don't know what I mean.
  • Reply 6 of 103
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,055member
    ecats wrote: »
    It would be impossible for me to enumerate how poorly written Adobe software titles are. The faults are too long to mention but has spawned entire websites dedicated to listing the faults in their software. (such as www.dearadobe.com)

    I understand that adobe's titles are so long in the tooth now that no one there has actually ever touched the old code, but with their switch to a subscription model and a near total absence of real competitors, now is the time for them to drop the feature-pumping and actually rewrite old code to modern standards. We desperately need an Adobe Mountain Lion/Snow Leopard/El Capitan.

    I've found that adobe has been paying a lot more attention to the little things that have been languishing for years since shifting the products to the CC model. Especially in Illustrator. It seemed Illustrator was always a second rate application when it came to refreshing older features.

    I haven't done anymore research than reading this AI article, but it sounds like this is a stability and usability release the way I read it.
  • Reply 7 of 103
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,055member
    yeah nah, I guess you don't use a Mac and so don't know what I mean.

    I don't know why I'm feeding the troll, but here goes.

    Yeah-ha I use a Mac.

    You don't use the normal Mac interface to go full screen with an adobe app. Adobe had built a full screen mode long before apple made a standardized interface for doing so.

    If you still don't believe me, I'm sure I could find you a YouTube clip showing how it's done.
  • Reply 8 of 103
    polymnia wrote: »
    I don't know why I'm feeding the troll, but here goes.

    Yeah-ha I use a Mac.

    You don't use the normal Mac interface to go full screen with an adobe app. Adobe had built a full screen mode long before apple made a standardized interface for doing so.

    If you still don't believe me, I'm sure I could find you a YouTube clip showing how it's done.

    I am well aware of Adobe's crumbly full screen mode that has limited usability.

    Even Microsoft has managed to add Apple's full screen mode to Office.

    So, can you answer my actual question or are you just wanting to be obnoxious for no reason.
  • Reply 9 of 103
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,055member
    I am well aware of Adobe's crumbly full screen mode that has limited usability.

    Even Microsoft has managed to add Apple's full screen mode to Office.

    So, can you answer my actual question or are you just wanting to be obnoxious for no reason.

    Am I being obnoxious?

    You asked if Adobe had full screen mode.

    I pointed out they've had one for years.

    You say I obviously don't use a Mac, and were rather snotty about it.

    I guess I've been using adobe's full screen mode for years. I didn't realize there was something wrong with it.
  • Reply 10 of 103

    A release concentrating on stability and performance enhancements is good. I got off Photoshop when it started following the subscription model, but I'd love to use the software again. Pity I cannot justify the cost.

  • Reply 11 of 103
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,932member

    Pushing people to rent is ridiculous, especially when the software is such a mess and behaves ever more like spyware. Thankfully at least Acrobat can still be purchased.

     

    Do the new apps even utilize OS X print facilities yet?

  • Reply 12 of 103
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    A release concentrating on stability and performance enhancements is good. I got off Photoshop when it started following the subscription model, but I'd love to use the software again. Pity I cannot justify the cost.

    Looks like the subscription is cheaper than the boxed version. That one sells for $1,749 these days

    http://www.amazon.com/Adobe-Photoshop-CS6-Mac-Version/dp/B007R0RKPO/ref=sr_1_1_twi_2_dvd?ie=UTF8&qid=1434435263&sr=8-1&keywords=adobe+photoshop+cs6
  • Reply 13 of 103
    I remember a time when, if Adobe released a new version of their product with features you didn't want or need, you could simply skip it and pocket your money. Maybe the years-overdue software fixes and lack of any new features are going to be life changers for CC subscribers, maybe not. But you're still paying for it whether you like it or not! Adobe's rolling back of "innovative new features" was bound to happen sooner rather than later, and they no longer have customers: they have revenue streams.
  • Reply 14 of 103
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,055member
    I remember a time when, if Adobe released a new version of their product with features you didn't want or need, you could simply skip it and pocket your money. Maybe the years-overdue software fixes and lack of any new features are going to be life changers for CC subscribers, maybe not. But you're still paying for it whether you like it or not! Adobe's rolling back of "innovative new features" was bound to happen sooner rather than later, and they no longer have customers: they have revenue streams.

    So when they trumpet big new features they are at fault for letting little problems and old code languish.

    When they step back and concentrate on polishing up neglected corners of their software they are 'rolling back innovative new features'

    I guess the common theme I can see is this:
    1. Adobe does something worthy of coverage on AI
    2. Abode is attacked from all angles because rentware hostages Creative Cloud eats babies, enslaves hobbyists and owns everything you will ever create into perpetuity
    3. I happily go about my work, designing graphics and paying the bills

    I'm glad Adobe has made a dated list of updates to CC. There are many more updates than we got in the old 18 month upgrade cycle:

    http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/features.html

    Maybe we are revenue streams, but they are plowing that revenue back into development and iterating on their products in ways they never did back in the day.

    I don't ever remember wanting to skip a version of Adobe apps. Granted, when the upgrades were $900 or whatever they used to run for the whole suite, I sometimes had no choice but to wait. Now with CC I'm very happy to never have to make the painful decision to sit out a new version of Adobe apps.
  • Reply 15 of 103
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,426member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Looks like the subscription is cheaper than the boxed version. That one sells for $1,749 these days

    http://www.amazon.com/Adobe-Photoshop-CS6-Mac-Version/dp/B007R0RKPO/ref=sr_1_1_twi_2_dvd?ie=UTF8&qid=1434435263&sr=8-1&keywords=adobe+photoshop+cs6

    Phil what's your opinion of the Serif Affinity products so far?

    I have to think if they must be giving Adobe pause for thought.

    http://www.serif.com
  • Reply 16 of 103
    foljsfoljs Posts: 382member

    """Am I being obnoxious? You asked if Adobe had full screen mode. I pointed out they've had one for years."""



    No, he asked if "
    do their apps use full screen mode on the Mac yet?".

     

    It's pretty obvious that he means if they USE Mac's full screen mode (which is a different beast that just "take the whole screen", interoperates with Mission Control, etc), not if they merely have some custom implementation.

  • Reply 17 of 103
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,426member
    The In-Brower client side editing feature Adobe offer for Muse sites, even on third party hosting platforms, is very nice and I see they have extended this to now include editing links as well as text and graphics. However, if text is synchronized between desktop, iPad and iPhone alternative sites, so they all update from a dingle change while retaining formatting (a phenomenal feature) it completely disables in-browser client side editing on the text that is synchronized. I was really hoping this update would fix this but I see no mention of this. I will update Muse as soon as I wake up and test this.
  • Reply 18 of 103
    djsherlydjsherly Posts: 1,031member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    No rentware for me.



    It's worked out cheaper for me. I used to buy lightroom every year and now I get it and PS for the same price.

     

    There's no reason to stick with superseded software. There are probably people out there quite happy with CS3 or even older but they'd be in the minority.

  • Reply 19 of 103
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,426member
    polymnia wrote: »
    Am I being obnoxious?

    You asked if Adobe had full screen mode.

    I pointed out they've had one for years.

    You say I obviously don't use a Mac, and were rather snotty about it.

    I guess I've been using adobe's full screen mode for years. I didn't realize there was something wrong with it.

    Not wanting to interrupt your on going discussion but I have to ask (and I use Adobe CC on a nMP) ... Does this 'Adobe full screen mode' work correctly with Mission Control (and let's not forget El Capitan in this) the way correctly implemented Full Screen Mode on a Mac does? Of course not. The problem with Adobe is they have foisted crappy PC interfaces on Mac users for decades now and refused to follow Apple's GUI guidelines.
  • Reply 20 of 103
    djsherlydjsherly Posts: 1,031member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    Not wanting to interrupt your on going discussion but I have to ask (and I use Adobe CC on a nMP) ... Does this 'Adobe full screen mode' work correctly with Mission Control (and let's not forget El Capitan in this) the way correctly implemented Full Screen Mode on a Mac does? Of course not. The problem with Adobe is they have foisted crappy PC interfaces on Mac users for decades now and refused to follow Apple's GUI guidelines.



    No quibble with that but it *is* full screen. Not Appley as you say but there's no other distractions. It does the job.

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