Apple issues second beta of OS X 10.11 El Capitan to developers

Posted:
in macOS edited June 2015
Just over two weeks after OS X 10.11 El Capitan was made official, Apple has supplied developers with the second beta of the new Mac operating system set to launch this fall.




Identified as build 15A204b, El Capitan beta 2 is now available to download through Apple's developer website. The pre-release software is intended for testing purposes only, and Apple cautions that it should not be used in a commercial operating environment or with important data.

A number of known issues unsurprisingly remain in the second beta of El Capitan, including problems when upgrading from OS X Lion or earlier. Issues are also present in Aperture, Disk Utility, iCloud Keychain, iPhoto, iTunes, Mail, Networking, Photos, Printing, SpriteKit, USB, Wi-Fi, and Language.

El Capitan is compatible with all Macs that can run OS X 10.10 Yosemite. While it is currently in beta, it will be a free upgrade available to Mac owners via the Mac App Store this fall.

Intended as mostly a refinement of Yosemite, El Capitan will still include a handful of new user-facing features. Most notably, the operating system includes a two-app viewing mode dubbed Split View, allowing users to quickly split screen space between two running apps.

Apple has also tweaked Mission Control in El Capitan, making multi-window desktop management simpler. Mission Control now arranges open app windows relative to their positioning on the desktop.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    Already? Sounds unstable. /s
  • Reply 2 of 10
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    No thanks.

    Sticking with Tiger!
  • Reply 3 of 10
    exsangusexsangus Posts: 20member
    This beta 2 no longer supports Xcode 6, so you will have to upgrade to Xcode 7 beta if you want to continue developing on a machine running El Capitan. So far seems to be a stable build.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    Running it without probe on a 12' MacBook. A bit laggy in places but that's betaware for you. Like the new window management and the ability to make/recv phone calls over wifi.
  • Reply 5 of 10
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,988member

    Curious to hear where others are seeing lagginess. I'm running El Cappy it on a mid-2011 MacBook Air with only 4GB RAM and it seems very stable and rather snappy. If this is beta quality I can't wait to see the final release. If you've been waiting for new release with a focus on robustness and stability rather than a slew of features your ship has come in.

  • Reply 6 of 10
    pakittpakitt Posts: 154member
    It is interesting that this new version of OS X is "a refinement" of the current version, and is rid with bugs everywhere...
    Did they change some basic library? basic foundation of the kernel? something that breaks down everything?
  • Reply 7 of 10
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,115member
    pakitt wrote: »
    It is interesting that this new version of OS X is "a refinement" of the current version, and is rid with bugs everywhere...
    Did they change some basic library? basic foundation of the kernel? something that breaks down everything?

    There's a shitload of under the hood changes, and it's pretty hilarious that you're attempting to claim its more "buggy" by comparing a just released developer beta1 product to a product publically released 8 months ago. Very trollish of you.
  • Reply 8 of 10
    pakittpakitt Posts: 154member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post





    There's a shitload of under the hood changes, and it's pretty hilarious that you're attempting to claim its more "buggy" by comparing a just released developer beta1 product to a product publically released 8 months ago. Very trollish of you.

    I am a Mac user across the board. Not some random Windows guy writing nonsense comments in Apple Forums to discredit the work of Apple.

    What I simply wanted to say, is that Apple "sells" El Capitan as a refinement of Yosemite, still the first 2 betas have, at least based on this article, bugs popping out in all apps across the board, beach balls, etc. So, as a regular non developer user I am asking "what is there to refine is the base has changed so much it is generating bugs everywhere? (which is perfectly understandable if the release was of a totally new OS release, for example) Is it really a refinement or something more profound we cannot see on the surface?".

    That's all.

    If it were only a "refinement", the betas should not have "bugs everywhere", as it seems, rather reduce and improve current Yosemite bugs (which are there, BTW - no software is perfect and QA at Apple in the last few months/years left a bit to be desired).

     

    I find it hilarious, instead, that you jump to the conclusion of whether I am a troll or not, not even knowing what type of user I am and if I use regularly Apple or not. How about being a passionate customer and man of science, questioning the wording of Apple marketing for a new release, that seems to be more than just a "refinement" and a "there you go, now you can even resize the Spotlight window"??? (as Craig Federighi himself put it - not to mention another couple of comments he made that made me think "he himself thinks this is BS").

     

    Signed,

    An Apple (troll?!) user.

     

    PS: I have made a restore from backup on a working iPhone 6 running iOS 8.3 - I get random resets now for no reason, with the same apps I used before the backup - is that quality software for a 700€ phone? not really - still I haven't and will not move to Android. There you go, I said it.

  • Reply 9 of 10
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member

    had to come back from the beyond here to comment.

     

    I would have posted similar to you, it is quite logical, and I understand your conceptual argument that if not much changed, why are there bugs.  But now as a developer, I realize, anytime you change stuff, it could cause a bug in something else, cause a regression bug, etc.   Touching the smallest thing can cause a noticeable or fatal bug sometimes. That's why testing is so important. And so underrated in many a place. It's the last step, and often written off...but is probably the most important!! Nothing matters if stuff doesn't work, right!  

     

    Anyway I'm finally excited about OS X again. I've been very happy on 10.6. Every time I use a newer OS X, I've left feeling very happy for multiple reasons. I don't want to get in to a war over which version is 'better', as for my uses 10.6 is better.. but I think finally stability, speed, feature parity and interface have gotten to a point again where I am ready to go. Still not a huge fan the OS X Metro-ification but the dark theme is nice. Delicious. That was the last touch that got me. I'm ready!  (for my MBP mid '10 8bg + SSD, still rocking everything smooth except Flash lol)

  • Reply 10 of 10
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member

    I would have posted similar to you, as it is quite logical, and I understand your conceptual argument that if not much changed, why are there bugs.  But now as a developer, I realize, anytime you change stuff, it could cause a bug in something else, cause a regression bug, etc.   Touching the smallest thing can cause a noticeable or fatal bug sometimes. That's why testing is so important. And so underrated in many a place. It's the last step, and often written off...but is probably the most important!! Nothing matters if stuff doesn't work, right!  

     

    Anyway I'm finally excited about OS X again. I've been very happy on 10.6. Every time I use a newer OS X, I've left feeling very happy for multiple reasons. I don't want to get in to a war over which version is 'better', as for my uses 10.6 is better.. but I think finally stability, speed, feature parity and interface have gotten to a point again where I am ready to go. Still not a huge fan the OS X flattening of the UI but the Dark theme is nice. Delicious. That was the last touch that got me. I'm ready!  (for my MBP mid '10 8bg + SSD, still rocking everything smooth except Flash lol)

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