AppleInsider podcast discusses Apple Music & the iPhone's 8th birthday, plus listener questions

Posted:
in General Discussion edited July 2015
This week's all-new AppleInsider podcast features Neil Hughes and Shane Cole as we discuss the Apple Music launch, Beats 1 going live, and leaked new iPod colors. Shane and Neil have a word to say on cloud services and the small storage of the entry-level iPhone, and we briefly reminisce about our first iPhones from 8 years ago.




AppleInsider staff members Neil Hughes, Shane Cole, and Victor Marks discuss the top stories:
  • Apple Music subscription service launches

  • Beats 1 radio station goes live

  • New iPod colors leak

  • Listener questions

  • The new trailer for Aaron Sorkin's "Steve Jobs" movie

  • The iPhone turns 8 years old

  • Apple loses $450 million appeal of the e-books antitrust case
The show is available on iTunes and your favorite podcast apps by searching for "AppleInsider." Click here to listen, subscribe, and don't forget to rate our show.

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You can also listen to it embedded via SoundCloud below:



Show note links: Follow our hosts on Twitter: @thisisneil, @vmarks and @shanecole_.

We'd appreciate your feedback and comments, as well as any questions that we can answer on future episodes. Send your responses to the AppleInsider podcast at [email protected] and follow or tweet at us @appleinsider.

Finally, anyone interested in sponsoring the show can reach out to us at [email protected].

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 2
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,758member

    I thought it was odd when Neil(?) said he uploaded a backup of his music into Google out of fear that Apple's cloud might fail to someday recognize that he owns those songs. It's a tinfoil hat strategy that's useless. The problem is (assuming the music is DRM AAC tracks from iTunes Music Store) the music is keyed off your iTunes account, so, for example, if you deauthorize a computer or device from using that account, those DRM tracks become useless. So even if your had backup copies of those tracks, if there was a problem with Apple's cloud and they forgot or lost your purchases, you wouldn't be able to authorize those tracks. Local copies might continue to play on the devices that were already authorized, but until Apple fixes their end, you would not be able to authorize those songs on new devices.

     

    So I keep copies of all my iTunes purchase receipts. If something happens and iTunes Store says I don't own those tracks, I will contact their iTunes support and provide a copy of the iTunes invoice showing that I own those tracks. For me, iTunes is my cloud. But yes, I do backup everything using Time Machine.

  • Reply 2 of 2
    nhughesnhughes Posts: 750editor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

     

    I thought it was odd when Neil(?) said he uploaded a backup of his music into Google out of fear that Apple's cloud might fail to someday recognize that he owns those songs. It's a tinfoil hat strategy that's useless. The problem is (assuming the music is DRM AAC tracks from iTunes Music Store) the music is keyed off your iTunes account, so, for example, if you deauthorize a computer or device from using that account, those DRM tracks become useless. So even if your had backup copies of those tracks, if there was a problem with Apple's cloud and they forgot or lost your purchases, you wouldn't be able to authorize those tracks. Local copies might continue to play on the devices that were already authorized, but until Apple fixes their end, you would not be able to authorize those songs on new devices.

     

    So I keep copies of all my iTunes purchase receipts. If something happens and iTunes Store says I don't own those tracks, I will contact their iTunes support and provide a copy of the iTunes invoice showing that I own those tracks. For me, iTunes is my cloud. But yes, I do backup everything using Time Machine.




    iTunes Match uploads *all* of my music to iCloud DRM-free, including songs purchased elsewhere (Amazon, ripped CDs, redeemed vinyl digital download codes, etc.). iTunes Store purchases (not Apple Music downloads) are also DRM-free, so they can be transferred to any device without the need for authorization.

     

    Google Music works exactly the same way as iTunes Match, except unlike the $25-per-year cost for iTunes Match, Google Music is 100% free.

     

    So, basically, I upload my songs to Google Music, in addition to iTunes Match, because it's free and why not? If Apple were to have some sort of inconceivably horrible server meltdown, and all of my iTunes Match songs in iCloud were to disappear, Google Music is a just-in-case redundancy on the go that comes at no cost to me.

     

    Hope this clarifies!

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