Apple introduces Australian market to lower App Store price tiers

Posted:
in iPhone edited October 2015
Apple on Thursday announced it has extended the App Store's "Alternate Tier" app pricing structure to Australia, adding two low-cost price level options for developers in the country.




Along with Australia's usual "Tier 1" App Store pricing of AU$1.49, a figure bumped up from AU$1.29 earlier this week, developers can now elect to charge Alternate Tier A and Alternate Tier B rates for paid apps and in-app purchases. Tier A and Tier B prices are only effective in Australia, meaning apps set to sell at those lower prices will carry Tier 1 pricing in other countries, Apple says.

The alternate price tier program is currently live in select markets around the world. China was one of the first App Stores to boast lower pricing options, and Apple later expanded the program to India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russia, South Africa and Turkey this summer.

Australian developers can get more information about Tier A and Tier B pricing via My Apps in iTunes Connect.

Due to fluctuating exchange rates, Apple recently made a number of price corrections to its online storefronts. Aside from Australia's App Store price hike and today's introduction of lower price tiers, the company upped digital content costs in Indonesia and Sweden. Yesterday, Apple raised Mac hardware prices in seven countries, including an 11 percent jump in Australia.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    Apple should be doing this automatically on at least a weekly basis, but preferably they should be doing it on a daily basis, since currencies are up and down with commodities, such in Canada. If oil goes up the Canadian dollar goes up, if oil goes down the dollar usually follows. Last week when oil went up as did the dollar the US Green Back fell as people sold US dollars and started buying Gols and other currencies and with countries such as China and the countries dumping US Bonds it's driving the US Greenback down.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member

    I support the raising of Apple prices worldwide in all countries that have weakening currencies. The US dollar is very strong now, and Apple has an obligation to adjust prices accordingly across the globe. To not do so would be irresponsible.

  • Reply 3 of 17
    hentaiboyhentaiboy Posts: 1,233member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

     

    I support the raising of Apple prices worldwide in all countries that have weakening currencies. The US dollar is very strong now, and Apple has an obligation to adjust prices accordingly across the globe. To not do so would be irresponsible.


     

    Fine. Just expect to sell less stuff (would you pay USD1,079 for a 16GB iPhone 6s)?

  • Reply 4 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

     

    I support the raising of Apple prices worldwide in all countries that have weakening currencies. The US dollar is very strong now, and Apple has an obligation to adjust prices accordingly across the globe. To not do so would be irresponsible.


     

    and yet oddly enough the US is still as close to bankrupt and is still ratcheting up the debt to ever higher levels.

     

    but then what I am saying, debt equals wealth these days.

     

    Talk about irresponsible.

  • Reply 5 of 17
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

     

     

    and yet oddly enough the US is still as close to bankrupt and is still ratcheting up the debt to ever higher levels.

     


     

    You want to give us an idea of what you're making your unfounded overgeneralization on? Public debt?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_public_debt

    If the US is close to bankruptcy then Austria, Germany, Canada, Spain, France, UK, Belgium, Singapore, Ireland, Iceland, Italy, Portugal, Greece, and Japan are even closer. (Public debt as percent of GDP)

     

    External debt?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_external_debt

    Again, by percent GDP, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Austria, France, Switzerland, the UK... are in a more "bankrupt" position than the US.

     

    Being responsible is actually understanding economic positions instead of making dumb assumptions.

  • Reply 6 of 17
    konqerror wrote: »
    You want to give us an idea of what you're making your unfounded overgeneralization on? Public debt?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_public_debt
    If the US is close to bankruptcy then Austria, Germany, Canada, Spain, France, UK, Belgium, Singapore, Ireland, Iceland, Italy, Portugal, Greece, and Japan are even closer. (Public debt as percent of GDP)

    External debt?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_external_debt
    Again, by percent GDP, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Austria, France, Switzerland, the UK... are in a more "bankrupt" position than the US.

    Being responsible is actually understanding economic positions instead of making dumb assumptions.

    and yet those countries didn't get increased pricing did they? Australia did, is it close to bankrupt, nope

    This isn't a battle to argue really is it?
  • Reply 7 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post





    and yet those countries didn't get increased pricing did they? Australia did, is it close to bankrupt, nope



    This isn't a battle to argue really is it?

     

    Yes they are. Australian household debt to GDP is 40% higher than the US, and most Western countries.

     

    http://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/australian-households-awash-with-debt-barclays-20150315-1lzyz4.html

    http://www.propertyobserver.com.au/forward-planning/investment-strategy/economy-and-demographics/39223-australian-private-debt-points-to-a-potential-financial-crisis.html

     

    Pointless arguing with a person who thinks a strong US dollar means the country is going bankrupt.

  • Reply 8 of 17
    konqerror wrote: »
    Yes they are. Australian household debt to GDP is 40% higher than the US, and most Western countries.

    http://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/australian-households-awash-with-debt-barclays-20150315-1lzyz4.html
    http://www.propertyobserver.com.au/forward-planning/investment-strategy/economy-and-demographics/39223-australian-private-debt-points-to-a-potential-financial-crisis.html

    Pointless arguing with a person who thinks a strong US dollar means the country is going bankrupt.

    ahh the good ol move the goal posts to prove you can move the goal posts
  • Reply 9 of 17

    The low-tier pricing in India is ridiculously low, something equivalent to $0.15! You get some very good games at that price.

     

    On the flip side, I had to pay ~$1400 for my new iPhone 6s Plus 128GB! I could have bought an entry level iMac for that price!

  • Reply 10 of 17
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,396member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

     

    The US dollar is very strong now, and Apple has an obligation to adjust prices accordingly across the globe. To not do so would be irresponsible.


    That's great and I agree, however, when the Dollar was weak, the prices didn't come down in other countries.

    If it was a fair fluctuation compared to the price of the Dollar, that'd be great but it doesn't.

  • Reply 11 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,881member
    I feel so...third world :embarrass



    [QUOTE]That's great and I agree, however, when the Dollar was weak, the prices didn't come down in other countries.
    If it was a fair fluctuation compared to the price of the Dollar, that'd be great but it doesn't.[/QUOTE]Actually, at least in Australia it did. At one (brief) stage a year or so after the GFC it was cheaper to buy an apple device here than in the US. That was a big change from the pre GST days where a wholesale tax and a range of other duties applied. In 1998 I was able to buy a wallstreet powerbook for $2,500 in the US, when the equivalent at home was $5,700.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    jblongzjblongz Posts: 153member

    Australian currency isn't far off.  I think many other regions of the world would need it.  When I was in Taiwan this year, I noticed that they pay about half our rate for songs/albums, but they don't have Radio or Apple Music features yet.  Still, there were albums and artists available to them that I cannot find in the USA store. :\

  • Reply 13 of 17
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,244member
    evilution wrote: »
    That's great and I agree, however, when the Dollar was weak, the prices didn't come down in other countries.
    If it was a fair fluctuation compared to the price of the Dollar, that'd be great but it doesn't.

    That's how it always works. Prices go up but they never go back down.
  • Reply 14 of 17
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,058member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JBDragon View Post





    That's how it always works. Prices go up but they never go back down.



    That is simply untrue. 

     

    Back when the Euro gained massive traction against the dollar, Apple machines became considerably cheaper here, albeit with a year's delay or so. 

  • Reply 15 of 17
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

     

     

    and yet oddly enough the US is still as close to bankrupt and is still ratcheting up the debt to ever higher levels.

     

    but then what I am saying, debt equals wealth these days.

     

    Talk about irresponsible.




    The "debt" is a lie used to control us, as long as a country can produce their own currency and the amount in circulation is roughly equivalent to productivity, then things will be ok.

     

    Private debt, on the other hand where people's spending power is eaten up by interest and a million fees and charges affects productivity as they tend to buy less.

  • Reply 16 of 17
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post





    ahh the good ol move the goal posts to prove you can move the goal posts



    We have our own sovereign currency unlike Greece, tied to the Euro or Argentina tied to US dollar.

     

    Australia will continue to be a small yet profitable market for Apple, as long as we don't hand over too much control via the TPP.

     

    If the idiots currently in charge can take their rose coloured glasses off for long enough.

     

    The current trade agreement we have with the US produced bugger all benefit for either of us.

  • Reply 17 of 17
    This a load is bullshit.

    When our Aussie dollar was high at US$1.10 high we did not see what should have been close to a 50% reduction in pricing compare to pricing now that we are at US$0.70.
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