Stop force closing apps on your iPhone, it's not making it run faster or last longer

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Comments

  • Reply 221 of 236
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,167member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rampage357 View Post

    Background refresh is garbage. iOS checks for too many things all the time. 

     

    The point of using background refresh is that things aren't checked "all the time". They rest and are collectively checked the next time an active data connection is established, to save power. 

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rampage357 View Post



    RAM=random access memory. iOS doesn't use RAM properly and neither does OSX or any of the Apple OS's.



    That's an…interesting statement. Care to explain to us what the hell you're talking about? 

  • Reply 222 of 236
    spheric wrote: »

    That's an…interesting statement. Care to explain to us what the hell you're talking about? 
    I don't see an us only a you. Everyone else gets it. Only a few people believe everything they read. This article was false and it only takes common sense to figure that out. Use all the expletives you want if you think it makes you sound smarter.
  • Reply 223 of 236
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,167member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rampage357 View Post





    I don't see an us only a you. Everyone else gets it. Only a few people believe everything they read. This article was false and it only takes common sense to figure that out. Use all the expletives you want if you think it makes you sound smarter.



    "Everyone else" gets that iOS and OS X "don't use RAM properly", and neither do "any of the Apple OS's" — of which there are presumably many? 

     

    That statement is just bordering on the bizarre and is probably the funniest thing we're going to read in this thread. I appreciate that you are unwilling and unable to back it up when questioned on it. 

     

    Incidentally, the memory compression introduced in Mavericks has been the single most impressive performance-boosting feature ever introduced in my 27 years of using Macintosh systems. 

    brettschulte
  • Reply 224 of 236
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    rampage357 wrote: »
    I don't see an us only a you. Everyone else gets it. Only a few people believe everything they read. This article was false and it only takes common sense to figure that out. Use all the expletives you want if you think it makes you sound smarter.

    So let me get this straight, you're saying that Apple uses RAM so ineffectively, and yet their devices are able to use less RAM than other operating systems while performing faster and more efficiently despite both this limitation in capacity and being complete idiots when it comes to their long history of vertical integration. Makes perfect sense¡ :rolleyes:
  • Reply 225 of 236
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,684member
    rampage357 wrote: »
    I don't see an us only a you. Everyone else gets it. Only a few people believe everything they read. This article was false and it only takes common sense to figure that out. Use all the expletives you want if you think it makes you sound smarter.

    US is the thread. Can you explain why you think OS X uses RAM inefficiently?
    brettschulte
  • Reply 226 of 236
    runbuhrunbuh Posts: 315member
    Cisco Jabber usage, even if not using it for a softphone,
    solipsismy wrote: »
    You mean even after disabling Background App Refresh, Cellular Data, Location, Notifications in every app that is using a great deal of power per the list in Battery? No, not in any harmful way if the app is running properly. As [@]chadbag[/@] mentioned, there are apps that can run for a short time after switching depending on the APIs they are using.
    Why would I disable all of that with an app that needs to talk to backend servers in order to perform the tasks for which is was designed?
  • Reply 227 of 236
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    runbuh wrote: »
    Why would I disable all of that with an app that needs to talk to backend servers in order to perform the tasks for which is was designed?

    So you're saying that using Fast App Switch to kill a potentially running app is better than trying to pinpoint which app or apps are causing problems and in what actions those apps are causing issues?
  • Reply 228 of 236
    runbuhrunbuh Posts: 315member
    chadbag wrote: »

    You can schedule yourself to be woken up periodically, or they can send a push (silent push) that will cause you to be woken up.  They are not in the background polling.
    Even so - see usage below from a several hour nighttime test with notifications enabled, but no messages sent or received in Skype for Business, and we don't use VoIP with Skype for Business/Lync. Yeah, we can blame Microsoft for a poorly written app. I'll be testing Cisco Jabber next, which does use VoIP in our design.
    700
  • Reply 229 of 236
    runbuhrunbuh Posts: 315member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    So you're saying that using Fast App Switch to kill a potentially running app is better than trying to pinpoint which app or apps are causing problems and in what actions those apps are causing issues?
    I'm saying that apps like Skype will use up your battery (see my other post today). Kill them when you don't need them. If a new version comes out that improves battery usage, that's great, but don't tell me that apps aren't doing something in the background using up the battery, which is what my back and forth was about with chadbag.
  • Reply 230 of 236
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    runbuh wrote: »
    I'm saying that apps like Skype will use up your battery (see my other post today). Kill them when you don't need them.

    Or, intelligently adjust the settings so you don't have to manually remove everything from FAS for fear that it might be running in the background. If you compulsively doing this you're simply wasting time and energy.

    but don't tell me that apps aren't doing something in the background using up the battery,

    I am telling you that. Unless the app is working improperly, the apps will only run in the background based on the parameters allowed but the APIs.
  • Reply 231 of 236
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,684member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    So you're saying that using Fast App Switch to kill a potentially running app is better than trying to pinpoint which app or apps are causing problems and in what actions those apps are causing issues?

    Pin pointing apps is nebbish. The vast majority of users use settings to set wallpapers and maybe ringtones once every few months.
  • Reply 232 of 236
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,684member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Or, intelligently adjust the settings so you don't have to manually remove everything from FAS for fear that it might be running in the background. If you compulsively doing this you're simply wasting time and energy.
    I am telling you that. Unless the app is working improperly, the apps will only run in the background based on the parameters allowed but the APIs.

    Unless running improperly is an enormous caveat.
  • Reply 233 of 236
    Thank you! I've been wondering why the $%#@! the apps appeared to be running again after closing apps then power cycle or reset. Mystery solved!
  • Reply 234 of 236
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by zroger73 View Post



    I don't buy this author's OPINION for one second. I have three apps on my iPhone and iPad right now that OBVIOUSLY drain the battery when they "aren't running": An IP camera app, a photo filter app, and a chat app. Time and time again I've found that "force closing" will stop the battery bleeding. The chat app will even cause the phone and other apps to hang if it is running (not running?) in the background.

     

    Actually he is correct. Provided that the apps are coded properly (which is a huge if), force quitting them doesn't actually do any good. Or at least not the abundance of good that folks that promote force quitting want you to think. 

     

    We have seen more than one example of poorly coded apps that don't shut down properly, don't release their memory properly and even don't honor user backgroup refresh settings correctly (hello Facebook)

  • Reply 235 of 236
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by thrang View Post



    At least as of a year ago, when I was in a Apple Store last for support, killing apps this way was a technique used by geniuses...

     

    They do that because something wasn't working properly. In a case like that it's fine, necessary even. But if things are working as they should there is no point in closing them just to close them. 

  • Reply 236 of 236
    I recently saw someone doing this and asked them why (which is how I found this article).  Maybe in older versions of iOS some apps wouldn't suspend?  I've never done this as long as I've had my phone (6S Plus) except for closing the occasional hung app and had no battery or performance issues to speak of.   Perhaps having started clean with iOS 9?
    edited March 2016
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