Apple's iPad Pro & powerful A9X CPU pose threat to Intel, Cowen says

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  • Reply 141 of 155
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,766member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CanukStorm View Post

     

    Instead of building an ARM-based MAC, would this allow Apple to merge the Mac App Store / iOS App Store for truly Universal Apps across Mac & iOS devices? That way, those who do use Macs can have the option run iOS Apps, obviously not unadultered, but optimized for KB / Mouse / trackpad? 


     

    I think that having Apps that can run on the Mac and IOS will come before they actually blend both (if they ever do).

    Obviously, not all apps can do that; but some would.

    Ipad pro apps would be a good candidate for a blended mode.

    That way, the mac side of the app, could interact with the Ipad Pro side in a seemless ways... Hmm. Intriguing.

  • Reply 142 of 155
    asciiascii Posts: 5,931member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dklebedev View Post

     

    You imply that being old is an issue in itself. But really, what the issue? Keyboards still work better than anything.




    That's right, if newer automatically means better, then the Samsung Galaxy must be better the iPhone. Better is what works best for the particular jib you're trying to accomplish.

  • Reply 143 of 155
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post





    A keyboard is still an anachronistic input device from the 1800s. I don't think the layout is as big of an issue as the whole concept.



    And pencils are even older. And language is older yet! The "concept" of the keyboard is that it is a very high-bandwidth device for production of language. It's not as fast as speech but faster than the pencil. Yet speed is not the only determinant of utility, as Dickens might once have said about his own pen.

  • Reply 144 of 155
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ipen View Post

     

    Only if the desktop Mac has a touch screen.  Many useful little Apps become awkward to use with keyboard and mouse.




    But if you have a trackpad, it might not be too awkward.

  • Reply 145 of 155
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,131member
    ronbo wrote: »

    But if you have a trackpad, it might not be too awkward.

    Not without a ux change.
  • Reply 146 of 155
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post





    Not without a ux change.



    You're probably right, since the iPad has no sense of cursor position, and the trackpad gives no indicator of where things are mapped except by moving a cursor.

  • Reply 147 of 155
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post

     

    You're probably right, since the iPad has no sense of cursor position, and the trackpad gives no indicator of where things are mapped except by moving a cursor.


    Except that tvOS has introduced a paradigm of non-touch input into the touch-based interface that is iOS. It's probably got some additions and fine-tuning to do, but the concept is there in practice already. Developers, users and Apple have at least the first version of touchpad input for iOS. No need for a mouse, no need for a cursor if same can be achieved in another way.

  • Reply 148 of 155
    ronboronbo Posts: 669member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

     

    Except that tvOS has introduced a paradigm of non-touch input into the touch-based interface that is iOS. It's probably got some additions and fine-tuning to do, but the concept is there in practice already. Developers, users and Apple have at least the first version of touchpad input for iOS. No need for a mouse, no need for a cursor if same can be achieved in another way.




    True. But I was replying to a guy saying you'd have to change the UI, and so both of you are right. The paradigm is available (and looks pretty good) and it would require a change in UI.

  • Reply 149 of 155
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,131member
    Except that tvOS has introduced a paradigm of non-touch input into the touch-based interface that is iOS. It's probably got some additions and fine-tuning to do, but the concept is there in practice already. Developers, users and Apple have at least the first version of touchpad input for iOS. No need for a mouse, no need for a cursor if same can be achieved in another way.

    As of now that is not officially in iOS. It would mean some kind of ux switch when the keyboard (or trackpad?) is attached. Instead if just touching the app to run you would select by swiping a trackpad left or right, then clicking to open.

    I think iOS will get that, and it needs it. Until then you need to use your finger as a touch/select and scroll input which isn't idea for a vertical screen.
  • Reply 150 of 155
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  • Reply 151 of 155
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dklebedev View Post

     

    It's a touch interface. With the interface taken to the remote.


    Exactly, how brilliant is my point - you don't touch the screen but it's still iOS (essentially), which I think is really exciting. This could easily be extended to external monitors you can connect to your iDevice or perhaps even a "laptop" device (with non-touch screen). The touch remote I think is perfect, it's a true and logical extension of the notion of "touch" by simply taking it off the screen and putting it on the remote (and not requiring a mouse/pointer to move focus around). This is obviously a first step toward iOS recognising and allowing "remote touch" input via some touchpad (modified or not).

     

    As an aside, I was arguing with someone over at Ars who believes a mouse is required at some point (with traditional pointer and cursor), where my position is a mouse/cursor/pointer would be an ugly betrayal of iOS. At some point I expect Apple to extend the tvOS remote touch paradigm when incorporating it back into iOS mainstream for use in various scenarios (laptops, external and multiple or additional monitors) using a touchpad (remote) only (not mouse), and being ingenious about how focus is indicated around the screen (as already occurs in tvOS) and within apps and documents, especially those which require a more pixel-precise movement and selection.

  • Reply 152 of 155
    Exactly, how brilliant is my point - you don't touch the screen but it's still iOS (essentially), which I think is really exciting. This could easily be extended to external monitors you can connect to your iDevice or perhaps even a "laptop" device (with non-touch screen). The touch remote I think is perfect, it's a true and logical extension of the notion of "touch" by simply taking it off the screen and putting it on the remote (and not requiring a mouse/pointer to move focus around). This is obviously a first step toward iOS recognising and allowing "remote touch" input via some touchpad (modified or not).

    As an aside, I was arguing with someone over at Ars who believes a mouse is required at some point (with traditional pointer and cursor), where my position is a mouse/cursor/pointer would be an ugly betrayal of iOS. At some point I expect Apple to extend the tvOS remote touch paradigm when incorporating it back into iOS mainstream for use in various scenarios (laptops, external and multiple or additional monitors) using a touchpad (remote) only (not mouse), and being ingenious about how focus is indicated around the screen (as already occurs in tvOS) and within apps and documents, especially those which require a more pixel-precise movement and selection.

    It's possible at some point that for broad, imprecise gestures (such as swipes) Apple may eventually employ motion sensing technology or image analysis using their cameras. Greater precision will still require multitouch or a Pencil.
  • Reply 153 of 155
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Reply 154 of 155
    The A9X is extremely impressive, but poses absolutely no threat onto Intel's consumer market nor graphics. First of all, benchmarks comparing an iPad with the A9X and nVidia Geforce 940m are comparing apples to oranges. The A9X runs and is heavily dependent on iOS and Metal API optimization; Apple engineers can heavily tailor iOS to suit their SoCs. However, with Windows being a cross-platform software (or cross SoC software), Microsoft engineers cannot specifically design Windows releases to suit an Intel CPU and leave AMD in the dust. Additionally, any device with the A9X SoC will be extremely overpriced- there's Apple for you- just look at the iPad Pro. For the price of any Apple offerings I should be able to get a laptop with a dedicated GPU and an Intel i7 quad.
  • Reply 155 of 155
    If Tablets outperform Gaming PC's and Laptops then i dunno whats happening....
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