Adobe debuts 2015 Creative Cloud updates with new 3D modeling app Fuse CC

Posted:
in General Discussion edited December 2015
Adobe launched updates to its Creative Cloud suite of creativity apps on Monday, bringing enhancements to stalwart titles like Photoshop and Premiere Pro, while introducing a 3D character modeling tool called Fuse CC.




Adobe's November update, first detailed at Adobe MAX in October, brings enhancements to its sprawling suite of apps built for graphics, photography, videography, Web, print and more. Desktop apps Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, InDesign CC, Dreamweaver CC, Premier Pro CC, After Effects CC, Audition CC and Media Encoder CC were updated, as well as mobile titles Capture CC, Photoshop Fix, Photoshop Mix, Photoshop Sketch, Comp CC and Premiere Clip. Online marketplace Adobe Stock and portfolio service Adobe Portfolio also received a few new features.

The company's flagship Photoshop CC gets an enhanced user experience with customizable toolbar and workspace, as well as touchscreen compatibility for devices like Microsoft's Surface Pro. Also new is a design environment for Web, UI and UX called Design Space, new Artboards features, Glyph panel enhancements, improvements to Creative Cloud Libraries and more.

Photoshop CC now integrates with Fuse CC, an app for quickly building 3D human characters. Designed for artists of all skill levels, Fuse is basically an assembly tool that lets users combine body parts, clothing, textures and more to render realistic characters editable in Photoshop CC. Alongside photography and video, users can print out their renderings with a 3D printer.




Adobe is taking advantage of iOS 9 capabilities with its mobile app lineup, adding Apple Pencil, Split View support and iPad Pro optimization to photo retouching app Photoshop Fix, photo composition app Photoshop Mix and drawing app Photoshop Sketch. Graphic design layout tool Comp CC also nabs iPad Pro and Split View support.

For videographers, Premier Pro CC has been updated with touch UI enhancements, HDR video support and integration with Adobe Stock. Premiere Clip on iOS is revamped with a new UI and features like automatic video correction and music syncing.

InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, After Effects CC, Adobe Audition CC and Dreamweaver CC come with minor improvements and feature additions, as well as better integration with Creative Cloud Libraries.

Adobe Creative Cloud products range in price depending on the application or suite being purchased. The Creative Cloud Photography plan, which comes with Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC, starts at $9.99 per month.

Per-app pricing is set at $15.99 per month, while an annual plan with access to all apps starts at $39.99 per month. Adobe also offers an annual package with access to all apps plus Adobe Stock media for $69.98 per month. For Cyber Monday, Adobe is taking 20 percent off select annual plans, including single apps, all apps and all apps plus Adobe Stock. The offer expires on Dec. 2.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    I'm updating my apps as I type this.

    What's most intriguing to me is the new Fuse app. I watched the short video about it on Adobe's site, and I'm very excited about its potential. It's great to see it so integrated with Photoshop, and CC Libraries.

    Can't wait to start playing with it!
  • Reply 2 of 17
    danielsw wrote: »
    I'm updating my apps as I type this.

    What's most intriguing to me is the new Fuse app. I watched the short video about it on Adobe's site, and I'm very excited about its potential. It's great to see it so integrated with Photoshop, and CC Libraries.

    Can't wait to start playing with it!

    Happy for you. These capabilities are beyond my pay grade, but I am happy that Adobe is supporting Apple products with their creative suite.
  • Reply 3 of 17
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post





    Happy for you. These capabilities are beyond my pay grade, but I am happy that Adobe is supporting Apple products with their creative suite.



    I'm happy about that, too! It was touch and go back in the late '80s when Adobe started supporting Windoze and in some cases without complete feature parity between platforms.

     

    I think Apple's recent prosperity and improving Mac and iOS device sales has induced Adobe to get enthusiastic about Apple again.

     

    There. Fuse has finally downloaded and installed itself.

     

    Off to play!

  • Reply 4 of 17

    Here's my first character I threw together. I have yet to play with adding materials and other PS layers.

     

    Looks great so far!

     

  • Reply 5 of 17
    danielsw wrote: »

    I think Apple's recent prosperity and improving Mac and iOS device sales has induced Adobe to get enthusiastic about Apple again.

    How recent are you talking about, because Adobe themselves have been almost exclusively demoing all of their software on Apple devices for a very long time. Since at least 2006. Only when Microsoft pays them big payola do they roll out something from Microsoft to show the Windows die-hards that they're still a consideration in the pipeline.
  • Reply 6 of 17
    How recent are you talking about, because Adobe themselves have been almost exclusively demoing all of their software on Apple devices for a very long time. Since at least 2006. Only when Microsoft pays them big payola do they roll out something from Microsoft to show the Windows die-hards that they're still a consideration in the pipeline.

    Well, if you read the article, Adobe has added touch interfaces with this update for the Surface to some of its desktop apps. And "recent" would include 2006, as my own involvement with Adobe as a customer goes back to 1987 when I bought Illustrator v1.01.
  • Reply 7 of 17
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,471member
    No update to Muse. That's a shame, it has a load of unfulfilled potential. Hopefully tAdobe will upgrade it in early 2016.
  • Reply 8 of 17
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post





    And "recent" would include 2006, as my own involvement with Adobe as a customer goes back to 1987 when I bought Illustrator v1.01.

    Cool, but I have you beat. Illustrator 1.0a.

     

    Did yours come with a VHS demo tape?

  • Reply 9 of 17
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post

     

    Here's my first character I threw together. 


    Looks sort of like the original Poser app that I used once an awhile.

  • Reply 10 of 17
    danielsw wrote: »
    Well, if you read the article, Adobe has added touch interfaces with this update for the Surface to some of its desktop apps. And "recent" would include 2006, as my own involvement with Adobe as a customer goes back to 1987 when I bought Illustrator v1.01.

    1) I read the article here and in many places this morning;
    2) "recent" means almost a decade ago? Gotcha;
    3) you're not the only old timer here, and I've also have been a customer (beta tester and trainer I might add) since before the first versions of either Illustrator or Photoshop ever were able to be purchased.

    So now... what's your point again? I made mine, but maybe I should spell it out to ya.

    Adobe has been demoing and using Macs for well over 10 years almost exclusively to show off the power of their software... while at the same time playing both sides of the court with Windows... when/if they get paid by Microsoft to be able to sell to their customers. Also... maybe I should add, that everything that is wrong with Adobe apps is because of Windows compatibility and the mess of frameworks Adobe uses to maintain that compatibility.

    Adobe creates "lowest common denominator software" using Apple OSX as the carrot, and sticks it to Apple whenever they get they chance... AKA the Back-Stabbing Two-Faced Whores of software... even more so than Microsoft IMHO.
  • Reply 11 of 17
    Here's some more "half-assed, half-baked" ideas that Adobe has in store, instead of just killing off Flash like they should.

    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 12 of 17
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post



    Here's some more "half-assed, half-baked" ideas that Adobe has in store, instead of just killing off Flash like they should.

     



    I have been using Flash CC for some time as my go to tool for HTML 5 animations. To me it looks like they recognize that SWF is dead but people still want animations. Looks good to me.

  • Reply 13 of 17
    How does Adobe's Fuse compare to the latest Poser? I've seen some very lifelike Poser work, some so good I was not aware it was not a person initially. The Fuse images I've seen so far do not look very sophisticated.
  • Reply 14 of 17
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,734moderator
    How does Adobe's Fuse compare to the latest Poser? I've seen some very lifelike Poser work, some so good I was not aware it was not a person initially. The Fuse images I've seen so far do not look very sophisticated.

    There are modellers and renderers. You can export models into different rendering engines. For example, here is a character model rendering in Unreal Engine:


    [VIDEO]


    [VIDEO]


    The modelling is done in ZBrush:

    http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showthread.php?197255-Khaleesi-The-throne-is-mine!-Realtime-character-Unreal-engine-4

    But you wouldn't do animation, posing or rendering in ZBrush. Fuse would let you build up models and then you can take them to another app. Its built-in rendering engine will probably not be high quality but a use case would be where you need a shape in a composition, whether it's video or a still image. Say that you have a photograph but a leg is missing in the photo. You can build up a 3D body in the same pose, take out a basic render and that gives a quick base to work from to integrate it back into the photo. You just need the face/head and you can add CGI bodies onto people:


    [VIDEO]


    Even augmented reality does an ok job at this:


    [VIDEO]


    If you were making a poster of an athlete or celebrity and their body was posed slightly off, photoshopping alone just gives you 2D manipulation but you could projection map the photo onto a model and that gives you extra freedom to move things around. Real-time engines all seem to be moving towards physically-based rendering (PBR). The results of this you can see in games like Star Wars Battlefront and Need for Speed:


    [VIDEO]


    It says here Fuse uses PBR shaders and mentions Unity and Unreal engines:

    http://blog.mixamo.com/product-update-newest-version-of-your-favorite-3d-character-creator

    They also have scanned content from the real world so this is more realistic and easier than making it yourself. Say that you had a photo of someone and wanted to put a particular piece of clothing on them, you could perhaps look up a certain Burberry jacket or shirt or whatever, put it on a 3D model, render out the clothing and then it will be deformed in a way that you can then composite into the photo. If it's done properly then you wouldn't be able to tell the person wasn't wearing that item of clothing and you would also have the freedom to instantly switch the clothing out for thousands of other items, whatever suited the composition best.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    mstone wrote: »
    Cool, but I have you beat. Illustrator 1.0a.

    Did yours come with a VHS demo tape?

    Yeah! I was so impressed that John Warnock himself was extolling the benefits of his own product. And his enthusiasm was genuine.
  • Reply 16 of 17
    1) I read the article here and in many places this morning;
    2) "recent" means almost a decade ago? Gotcha;
    3) you're not the only old timer here, and I've also have been a customer (beta tester and trainer I might add) since before the first versions of either Illustrator or Photoshop ever were able to be purchased.

    So now... what's your point again? I made mine, but maybe I should spell it out to ya.

    Adobe has been demoing and using Macs for well over 10 years almost exclusively to show off the power of their software... while at the same time playing both sides of the court with Windows... when/if they get paid by Microsoft to be able to sell to their customers. Also... maybe I should add, that everything that is wrong with Adobe apps is because of Windows compatibility and the mess of frameworks Adobe uses to maintain that compatibility.

    Adobe creates "lowest common denominator software" using Apple OSX as the carrot, and sticks it to Apple whenever they get they chance... AKA the Back-Stabbing Two-Faced Whores of software... even more so than Microsoft IMHO.

    What a sad and dreary life you must lead to spend so many words of protest on this silly thread.
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