T-Mobile adds Amazon Video, other services to controversial Binge On program

Posted:
in iPhone
T-Mobile on Thursday announced the addition of four new partners to its Binge On program for subscribers, including Amazon Video, Fox News, Univision Now, and the WWE Network.




The carrier now has over 40 participating services, according to an announcement. With Binge On active, a subscriber's video quality is reduced to about 480p (DVD level), but in exchange they can stream as much video as they want from participating services without it counting towards monthly data caps.

It should also be simpler to toggle the feature. Dialing #264# on a smartphone will check settings, while dialing #263# or #266# will turn it off or on, respectively. The option is likewise easier to find at t-mobile.com.

T-Mobile is further releasing an updated mobile app along the same lines. While it will slowly roll out to Android users beginning today, an iOS release is only due sometime in February.

Binge On has become controversial for multiple reasons. It was for instance found to be throttling all video to just 1.5 megabits per second, and downgrading services not officially signed up for the program, such as YouTube.

More seriously, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is considering whether it violates net neurtrality rules. Those rules mandate that Internet service providers can't degrade traffic based on the basis of content or service, excluding "reasonable network management."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    jason98jason98 Posts: 766member
    How can something completely optional be controversial?
  • Reply 2 of 6
    dws-2dws-2 Posts: 267member
    The "controversy" surrounding this seems bizarre to me. First, it's optional. Second, it's opt-in, but that seems appropriate because almost everyone I know prefers to have the binge option. The people who don't like it tend to be computer geeks who are more than capable of opting out.

    I just don't understand the problem. This seems like a great way to handle mobile video for 95% of people.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 3 of 6
    In general, it's very interesting to see the steps this global, european telecommunications company will take to prevent admitting it's underfunded network isn't scalable and can't compete without special rules. Perhaps they would have been more successful as a regional company. Still, companies that require a customer to change the way a service is consumed or the default way a service is billed might be ok in a socialist country in Europe, but in the US it's not competitive. If T-Mobile can't compete without special rules specific to themselves, including discounts on airwaves, being insubordinate to Judges orders following lawsuits filed in US Court, requiring T-Mobile employees to sign gag orders after being victims of sexual abuse, or inviting Wallstreet analysts to drink while on a conference calls with competitors, the company doesn't seem to manage itself very well. Good thing this company isn't in the home broadband business. It would be a field day if Verizon and AT&T did even one of these things.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 4 of 6
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,464member
    In general, it's very interesting to see the steps this global, european telecommunications company will take to prevent admitting it's underfunded network isn't scalable and can't compete without special rules. Perhaps they would have been more successful as a regional company. Still, companies that require a customer to change the way a service is consumed or the default way a service is billed might be ok in a socialist country in Europe, but in the US it's not competitive. If T-Mobile can't compete without special rules specific to themselves, including discounts on airwaves, being insubordinate to Judges orders following lawsuits filed in US Court, requiring T-Mobile employees to sign gag orders after being victims of sexual abuse, or inviting Wallstreet analysts to drink while on a conference calls with competitors, the company doesn't seem to manage itself very well. Good thing this company isn't in the home broadband business. It would be a field day if Verizon and AT&T did even one of these things.
    I can't believe this nonsense I'm reading. By definition telecom are not a true capitalistic endeavor. The bar to entry is too high and the entire enterprise is completely regulated with regard to spectrum. They have to be subject to the public interest because the public has granted certain companies near exclusive rights to a publicly shared and owned resource.

    U.S. cell rates have just started coming down to a reasonable level and a large part of that is due to T-mobile fighting the AT&T and Verizon duopoly with competitive rates and policies.

    edited January 2016 dws-2
  • Reply 5 of 6
    Also find this bizarre and the service great! Not sure why one wants super quality, beyond the DVD quality offered, on a mobile device?? I just want to watch shows on elliptical in the gym and love this feature!!
    dws-2trumptman
  • Reply 6 of 6
    trumptman said:
    In general, it's very interesting to see the steps this global, european telecommunications company will take to prevent admitting it's underfunded network isn't scalable and can't compete without special rules. Perhaps they would have been more successful as a regional company. Still, companies that require a customer to change the way a service is consumed or the default way a service is billed might be ok in a socialist country in Europe, but in the US it's not competitive. If T-Mobile can't compete without special rules specific to themselves, including discounts on airwaves, being insubordinate to Judges orders following lawsuits filed in US Court, requiring T-Mobile employees to sign gag orders after being victims of sexual abuse, or inviting Wallstreet analysts to drink while on a conference calls with competitors, the company doesn't seem to manage itself very well. I suppose T-Mobile customers can take pride in choosing to do business with the phone company equivalent to a drunk version of the Special Olympics. Good thing this company isn't in the home broadband business. It would be a field day if Verizon and AT&T did even one of these things.
    I can't believe this nonsense I'm reading. 

    Wow! Your snark does go to 11!!
    edited January 2016
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