This week on AI: Apple vs. the FBI, Apple vs. Kanye West, Apple vs. the world

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2016
Seemingly everyone in the tech world was talking about Apple's fight with the U.S. government over encryption and backdoor access to iOS. But the iPhone maker also found itself under fire from a variety of others as well, including hedge fund managers, and even rapper Kanye West. Catch up now on the busy week that was.


Source: TomoNews


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Everything you need to know:



  • The FBI and DOJ want to force Apple to unlock a terrorist's iPhone > >
  • But Apple has fought back, and Tim Cook has said the company won't create a "backdoor" for iOS > >
  • The dispute has drawn battle lines, with both Republicans and Democrats siding with the government > >
  • Tech companies and security experts, however, have largely sided with Apple > >
  • In non-encryption news, Kanye West begged his fans to subscribe to Apple Music competitor Tidal > >
  • In addition to being $53M in debt, he has no plans to bring his new album to Apple Music > >
  • Hedge fund managers Carl Icahn and David Einhorn recently cut their positions in AAPL stock > >
  • The march to Apple's expected March 15 event continues, with the latest leaks on "iPhone 5se" and "iPad Air 3" > >
  • Rumors about the anticipated "iPhone 7" swirl too, though it isn't expected 'til September > >


For in-depth discussion of the encryption debate, listen to the AppleInsider podcast. Subscribe here, or stream the embed below:



A roundup of our hottest stories this week:



Tim Cook calls FBI backdoor demand 'dangerous,' vows to fight case

US Department of Justice files motion to force Apple to crack terrorist's iPhone

Donald Trump says Apple should back down in San Bernardino case

White House says FBI wants access to one iPhone, not blanket backdoor from Apple

Editorial: User security, privacy issues draw sharp contrast between Apple iOS, Google Android in FBI encryption case

Protestors gather at San Francisco Apple Store to support fight against government backdoors

John McAfee offers to decrypt iPhone used by San Bernardino terrorists, criticizes FBI

Senate committee chair mulls bill to punish companies that refuse decryption requests

Facebook, Twitter voice support for Apple's stance on encryption

Apple reportedly enlists aid of free-speech attorneys in encryption battle

Billionaire Mark Cuban says Apple deserves a 'standing ovation' for fighting FBI on encryption

Apple issues new version of iOS 9.2.1 to fix iPhones bricked by 'Error 53'

Apple chip suppliers gearing up capacity for 'iPhone 7' production - report

Inside iOS 9.3: Apple will allow third-party apps to add music to your iCloud Music Library

New 4-inch iPhone to run Apple's A9 chip, 'iPad Air 3' to sport A9X - report

Apple Pay launches in China with support for 80% of credit and debit cards

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    Some info, instead of repeating the same: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-apple-software-fbi-hack-iphone.html
  • Reply 2 of 15
    It's a pity  that an iPhone 5C was used, an iPhone 5S and higher could have been unlocked right away.
  • Reply 3 of 15
    knowitall said:
    Thanks, useful info.

    The big concern is around "Just this one time" claims.  Even if the govt is sincere in those claims now, whenever the next security incident / attack happens it'll be irresistible to re-open that door: "Well... just ONE more time."  Access to info is like a drug: the first hit gets you hooked, then you keep coming back for another fix.
    quadra 610calibrian greenindyfxargonautbaconstang
  • Reply 4 of 15

    The big concern is around "Just this one time" claims.  Even if the govt is sincere in those claims now, whenever the next security incident / attack happens it'll be irresistible to re-open that door: "Well... just ONE more time."  Access to info is like a drug: the first hit gets you hooked, then you keep coming back for another fix.

    Well put. 
    cali
  • Reply 5 of 15
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Wow what a week!
  • Reply 6 of 15
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,585member
    you’d like to support Apple’s stance on privacy, there is a White House petition at https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/apple-privacy-petition
    baconstang
  • Reply 7 of 15
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,231member
    cali said:
    Wow what a week!
    I'm sitting on the first row for the next one. 
    It looks like Apple isn't the only one who painted itself in a corner.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    So the County was able to reset the iCloud Apple ID's password because presumably they had access to Syed's primary or recovery email address. By changing the password they inadvertently are preventing the iPhone from performing a current iCloud backup (the existing last backup is quite old). I take it then that Apple has a way to decrypt an iCloud backup when legally compelled?  What I'm wondering though is why the County can't send a command to clear the unlock passcode unless the County-owned device was not enrolled in (or became unenrolled from) an MDM?  Also wondering what the passcode length and complexity are, as well as what the 'other 3' suggestions Apple had to gain access. 
  • Reply 9 of 15
    knowitall said:
    It's a pity  that an iPhone 5C was used, an iPhone 5S and higher could have been unlocked right away.
    TouchID requires a living finger to work.
    calijustadcomicsbaconstang
  • Reply 10 of 15
    knowitall said:
    Thanks, useful info.

    The big concern is around "Just this one time" claims.  Even if the govt is sincere in those claims now, whenever the next security incident / attack happens it'll be irresistible to re-open that door: "Well... just ONE more time."  Access to info is like a drug: the first hit gets you hooked, then you keep coming back for another fix.
    More worried about hackers 
    baconstang
  • Reply 11 of 15
    Being 'dissed' by Kanye is not going to be the end of the world. I recon he was trying to deflect attention from the mediocre reviews of that thing he calls music that he has released but not to Apple.
    For someone so much in debt he sure knows how not to maximise his income.

    As for the iPhone. The FBI is IMHO know that Apple can't comply but have to keep this up otherwise they can't legally use any data obtained from the phone. However the precident this sets in very very worrying.
    Someone is gonna have to back down soon or this will run and run and run for a very long time.
  • Reply 12 of 15
    techrider said:
    So the County was able to reset the iCloud Apple ID's password because presumably they had access to Syed's primary or recovery email address. By changing the password they inadvertently are preventing the iPhone from performing a current iCloud backup (the existing last backup is quite old). I take it then that Apple has a way to decrypt an iCloud backup when legally compelled?  What I'm wondering though is why the County can't send a command to clear the unlock passcode unless the County-owned device was not enrolled in (or became unenrolled from) an MDM?  Also wondering what the passcode length and complexity are, as well as what the 'other 3' suggestions Apple had to gain access. 

    I could be wrong here, but the issue here seems to be the county reset the iCloud password, so they know the new AppleID password, but the phone doesn't have the new password so it won't backup its data. But they don't have the passcode so they can't get into the phone to make the backup. So basically, they didn't lock themselves out of iCloud, they locked the phone out of iCloud.

    knowitall said:
    It's a pity  that an iPhone 5C was used, an iPhone 5S and higher could have been unlocked right away.
    TouchID requires a living finger to work.
    Yes, but not the same finger. If you can lift a fingerprint from someone, you can make a latex copy, place it over your finger, and open the phone. This was demonstrated when TouchID was first released.


  • Reply 13 of 15
    Hope Apple will win all obstacles.
  • Reply 14 of 15
    yes, but not the same finger. If you can lift a fingerprint from someone, you can make a latex copy, place it over your finger, and open the phone. This was demonstrated when TouchID was first released.


    I am not sure how does others fingerprint works?
  • Reply 15 of 15
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,231member
    knowitall said:
    It's a pity  that an iPhone 5C was used, an iPhone 5S and higher could have been unlocked right away.
    TouchID requires a living finger to work.
    It doesn't, that's an urban legend.
    But right away means, right away, a finger is still 'alive' a few moments after death.
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