Apple Pay a hit in China with 3 million cards added in 2 days

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 48
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,179member
    jony0 said:
    Whenever it comes to Canada, with a bank issued credit card of course, the adoption rate should be just as spectacular, proportionally to our much smaller population obviously. We've has chip and pin for years, but we're hung up and just waiting for our big bank cartel to get off their greedy big fat asses.
    Yep. All my credit and debit cards have been chip and pin for the last 10 years, at least. The fact that this isn't the case in the US, even today, blows my mind. 
  • Reply 42 of 48
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    jony0 said:
    Whenever it comes to Canada, with a bank issued credit card of course, the adoption rate should be just as spectacular, proportionally to our much smaller population obviously. We've has chip and pin for years, but we're hung up and just waiting for our big bank cartel to get off their greedy big fat asses.
    Too late. Canada already sold all of its gold reserves.
  • Reply 43 of 48
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,170member
    volcan said:
    Soli said:

    1) Touch ID isn't required for using Apple Pay. You can test this with an Apple Watch which only requires a double-tap of the Contracts button to bring up your cards, assuming the device is on your wrist and you've inputted the device PIN. 
    I've noticed lately that my Apple Watch somehow pairs up with my iPhone all by itself without using the passcode. I don't enter the passcode when I strap it on in the morning but some time during the day I notice it is paired and no passcode was ever entered. Not sure how this happens or what triggers it but it happens everyday. Right now it has a blue dot but later it will go away all by itself.

    If you strap on your watch, any time after that, that you go and unlock your iPhone with a code or touch is, the watch will auto unlock also if you have that capability turned on!!!. So in general you never have to enter a unlock code on the watch.  
  • Reply 44 of 48
    jony0jony0 Posts: 270member
    slurpy said:
    jony0 said:
    Whenever it comes to Canada, with a bank issued credit card of course, the adoption rate should be just as spectacular, proportionally to our much smaller population obviously. We've has chip and pin for years, but we're hung up and just waiting for our big bank cartel to get off their greedy big fat asses.
    Yep. All my credit and debit cards have been chip and pin for the last 10 years, at least. The fact that this isn't the case in the US, even today, blows my mind. 

    It does seem odd that they are late adopters but I can only think it may have something to do with our cartel of just a few banks to deal with. The chip and PIN is the implementation of the EMV standard (Europay Mastercard Visa) developed in Europe. It was probably relatively easy to bring a handful of participants in Canada onboard yet considerably onerous to deal with over a thousand banks in the US. Apple Pay along with NFC would seem to have the promise of leapfrogging EMV but they will still have to bring out terminals that can accommodate both since not everyone will have a smartphone just yet.

    Apple used a gradual yet remarkably speedy rollout with a handful of US banks at a time, each group probably seeing the advantage and wanting to quickly come on board. The same small cartel group of banks that became an advantage for a quick technological adoption seems to have ironically turned broom as hindrance as they could holdout as a group for better financial terms. Just goes to show, always follow the money.

  • Reply 45 of 48
    jony0jony0 Posts: 270member
    jony0 said:
    Whenever it comes to Canada, with a bank issued credit card of course, the adoption rate should be just as spectacular, proportionally to our much smaller population obviously. We've has chip and pin for years, but we're hung up and just waiting for our big bank cartel to get off their greedy big fat asses.
    Too late. Canada already sold all of its gold reserves.

    Wow. At first when I saw your comment I thought you were kidding, then I saw it was a link and thought it was pointing to something like The Onion, then I was incredulous to see it was serious and shocked to see it was real. But after reading it I calmed down and came to see the reasoning. It would seem we owe this whole sellout policy to Nixon who “took the United States off the gold standard” therefore “Ottawa has no real reason to keep its gold reserves other than adhering to tradition”, In fact “half of those reserves were sold by 1985, and then almost all the rest were sold through the 1990s up to 2002” so this is not really new but still startling, I had no idea. It does make sense and I actually agree. Gold certainly has an intrinsic value like real estate as opposed to the extrinsic value of a various numbers on a piece of paper or cotton. Very interesting.

    Thanks for the link … and the ride.

  • Reply 46 of 48
    3 million cards in 2 days is actually a modest number. Anything below 12 million is a disappointment in China, whose smart payments market is an order of magnitude larger than that of the U.S.
  • Reply 47 of 48
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 831member
    ApplePay at Walgreens rocks because it is the correct implementation.  At Fresh Market they still make you do the fake digital signature. When people are forced to insert their credit cards in the chip readers (which is sooo slow), it will take off more quickly.
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