Microsoft announces Xbox Live cross-network support, could portend Xbox One-Apple device multiplaye

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2016
Microsoft on Monday revealed a major shift in its console gaming strategy with the announcement of cross-network Xbox Live gameplay, and with seemingly open support for all comers, the feature could make its way to titles distributed through Apple's iOS, Mac and tvOS App Stores.


Psyonix's "Rocket League" will be one of the first games to support Xbox One cross-network gameplay.
Source: Psyonix


[email protected] program director Chris Charla made the announcement in tandem with news of native support for cross-platform play between Xbox One and Windows 10. Cross-network support promises Xbox Live users the ability to play online with gamers using a different system, for example Sony's PlayStation 4.

"Of course, it's up to game developers to support this feature, and Xbox Live players will always have the option of choosing to play only with other Xbox Live players," Charla said.

Microsoft confirmed developer Psyonix is building cross-network gameplay into Xbox One and PC versions (via Steam) of "Rocket League," one of the first games to support the new capability. Charla said Microsoft is extending an "open invitation" to participate, though it's up to providers to build out support for their own networks.

While just theory at this point, Microsoft's willingness to make Xbox Live a more open ecosystem could lay the groundwork for titles that support multiplayer action between Xbox One and Apple's iPhone, iPad, Mac or Apple TV. For example, a developer might add cross-network multiplayer to a stripped-down shooter available on Xbox Arcade and the tvOS App Store, or perhaps a two-player puzzler on iOS.

Beyond "Rocket League," developers have not yet expressed interest in Microsoft's new Xbox Live capabilities. Larger game studios are well-positioned to implement cross-network compatibility, and many already have iOS versions of popular franchises, but it is unclear if they are willing to dedicate resources to bring parity between the various platform offerings. Further, Apple relies on game makers to host their own multiplayer networks, meaning the first titles to benefit from cross-network hooks would likely be ports from an established studio.

Valve's Steam marketplace is another option for Mac, though only certain games are Mac-compatible. "Rocket League," unfortunately, is a Windows-only title.

At this point it's too early to say whether or not developers will curry to Microsoft's newfound openness, but gamers have been waiting for a cross-network solution since Xbox and PlayStation ushered in console-based online gaming over a decade ago. The advent of multiplayer mobile games, the proliferation of which comes in large thanks to Apple's iOS App Store, might serve to underscore the need for universal multiplayer networks.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    Joe111Joe111 Posts: 8member
    Cool.
  • Reply 2 of 10
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Screw this I want Apple to take gaming seriously. I was disappointed with the lack of Apple tech in the new Apple TV. They could have included the M9 motion chip and Taptic engine in Siri Remote and an A9X chip at the least, then you have the Kinect team who could have put something together. If Apple took gaming seriously and ramped up Game Center, they could easily destroy XBL.
    apple iigsargonautjony0
  • Reply 3 of 10
    cali said:
    Screw this I want Apple to take gaming seriously. I was disappointed with the lack of Apple tech in the new Apple TV. They could have included the M9 motion chip and Taptic engine in Siri Remote and an A9X chip at the least, then you have the Kinect team who could have put something together. If Apple took gaming seriously and ramped up Game Center, they could easily destroy XBL.
    I agree with that but not the part about destroying XBL. Triple A games are still what brings people to buy the $400 console. The Apple TV is woefully underpowered for that. Apple still has a chance to be a big player in the living room with video games. Al-a like a better version of the nintendo wii. I'll never quite understand why Apple seems to be averse to really getting behind video games. This has been an ongoing issue with apple for a very long time. Not to sound cliche but this has been a problem going all the way back to the mac in 1984. Steve Jobs just didn't like video games and thought they would make the macintosh a game machine not to be taken seriously by business customers. Apple has never truly shed this from their DNA all these years later.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 677member
    Apple is returning the favour of ms backing Apple with encryption?
  • Reply 5 of 10
    ...Not to sound cliche but this has been a problem going all the way back to the mac in 1984. Steve Jobs just didn't like video games and thought they would make the macintosh a game machine not to be taken seriously by business customers. Apple has never truly shed this from their DNA all these years later...
    Considering both Steve worked at Atari in their earlier days :-)
    edited March 2016 razorpit
  • Reply 6 of 10
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 927member
    ...Not to sound cliche but this has been a problem going all the way back to the mac in 1984. Steve Jobs just didn't like video games and thought they would make the macintosh a game machine not to be taken seriously by business customers. Apple has never truly shed this from their DNA all these years later...
    Considering both Steve worked at Atari in their earlier days :-)
    Well one of them did, the other did a little outsourcing.  ;-)
  • Reply 7 of 10
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,885member
    cali said:
    Screw this I want Apple to take gaming seriously. I was disappointed with the lack of Apple tech in the new Apple TV. They could have included the M9 motion chip and Taptic engine in Siri Remote and an A9X chip at the least, then you have the Kinect team who could have put something together. If Apple took gaming seriously and ramped up Game Center, they could easily destroy XBL.
    Fact is that XB1 and PS4 are niche products. Apple should focus on casual gaming for ATV just like they did with the iOS apps. Burdening ATV with hardware that rivals a PS4 or XB1 does not serve the needs of most customers, drives up the price and limits sales. Apple knows what they want to be and a game console supplier is not it.
    jony0
  • Reply 8 of 10
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cali said:
    Screw this I want Apple to take gaming seriously. I was disappointed with the lack of Apple tech in the new Apple TV. They could have included the M9 motion chip and Taptic engine in Siri Remote and an A9X chip at the least, then you have the Kinect team who could have put something together. If Apple took gaming seriously and ramped up Game Center, they could easily destroy XBL.
    Apple TV could easily destroy XBL?

    No it couldn't.  That is a serious case of kool-aid intoxication you have there.
    singularitydasanman69
  • Reply 9 of 10
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,160member
    mike1 said:
    cali said:
    Screw this I want Apple to take gaming seriously. I was disappointed with the lack of Apple tech in the new Apple TV. They could have included the M9 motion chip and Taptic engine in Siri Remote and an A9X chip at the least, then you have the Kinect team who could have put something together. If Apple took gaming seriously and ramped up Game Center, they could easily destroy XBL.
    Fact is that XB1 and PS4 are niche products. Apple should focus on casual gaming for ATV just like they did with the iOS apps. Burdening ATV with hardware that rivals a PS4 or XB1 does not serve the needs of most customers, drives up the price and limits sales. Apple knows what they want to be and a game console supplier is not it.
    XB1 and PS4 are hardly niche products. If those are niche products, what is ATV then? ATV sales don't come even remotely close to PS4/XB1 sales. Gaming sales in the U.S. alone are over $15 billion. App games don't even come close to that. The fact is, traditional gaming revenue blows away casual gaming app revenue. 
    singularitydasanman69
  • Reply 10 of 10
    mike1 said:
    Fact is that XB1 and PS4 are niche products. Apple should focus on casual gaming for ATV just like they did with the iOS apps. Burdening ATV with hardware that rivals a PS4 or XB1 does not serve the needs of most customers, drives up the price and limits sales. Apple knows what they want to be and a game console supplier is not it.
    XB1 and PS4 are hardly niche products. If those are niche products, what is ATV then? ATV sales don't come even remotely close to PS4/XB1 sales. Gaming sales in the U.S. alone are over $15 billion. App games don't even come close to that. The fact is, traditional gaming revenue blows away casual gaming app revenue. 
    Good post.

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