Apple reminds developers of impending iAd App Network shutdown, APIs to be deprecated

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2016
Apple in an email blast on Wednesday reminded developers of the impending iAd App Network shutdown that will bring an end to monetization revenues and app promotion on June 30, as scheduled.




In the message, a copy of which was obtained by AppleInsider, Apple thanks developers who utilized the iAd App Network and related services, adding that the service will be discontinued next month. The email stands as written notice that Apple intends to terminate all Developer Advertising Services Agreements on June 30, 2016, at 11:59 a.m. Pacific.

Apple announced the impending network closure in January, but a poorly worded explainer caused confusion as to what, exactly, was shutting down. Some reports claimed the closure was limited to the iAd App Network, the mechanism by which developers buy ad space to market their own apps, while others said the entire platform would be discontinued.

An Apple support webpage notes developers should remove the deprecated iAd.Framework classes from their respective apps as no ads will be served starting July 1. Inclusion of deprecated assets shouldn't cause app crashes, but will likely result in Xcode error messages.

With the deprecation of iAd related APIs and the iAd SDK, it seems Apple is indeed terminating the monetization network -- banner ads, interstitials and pre-rolls -- for third party developers. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for clarification.

Apple's support document says revenues generated through iAd advertising are expected for payout by Sept. 30, 2016, while campaign performance reports will be available on iAd Workbench until December 31, 2016.

With the iAd network closing down, developers reliant on the service must move to third-party ad publishing networks and direct ad sales.

Apple's iAd platform launched in 2010 as a means of leveraging the company's massive installed customer base. While investors had high hoped for the service, a series of strategic fumbles, from expensive pricing tiers to burdensome restrictions, drove potential advertisers to competitors. In January, shortly before Apple announced the iAd App Network closure, BuzzFeed reported that the company planned to exit the ad selling business, and would dramatically scale back iAd operations.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    We better click on all the iAds while we can.
  • Reply 2 of 6
    dacloodacloo Posts: 890member
    Apple sucks at services & apps lately:

    iCloud file management is a bad copy of Dropbox and still wants us to store files in 'app folders' by default. Syncing status is unclear.

    iTunes is a mess. Ow and it's called Music on iOS. I guess. It requires iTunes Match to sync downloaded files, and mixes my library with streamed music. Over-complex.

    Mail hasn't been innovated on since iOS1.

    Their pro apps are being neglected and/or abandoned. Roadmap entirely unclear.

    Hey, but Photos for OSX is actually quite good. 
    hjmnl
  • Reply 3 of 6
    hmlongcohmlongco Posts: 178member
    With Siri, Apple has basically thrown away 4 years of lead time and let Amazon and Google catch up -- and in some places even surpass -- Apple's first-mover status. 

    I'm an Apple iOS developer, and I can't tell you how disappointed I was when last year's WWDC ended without a single mention of a Siri API.

    Same goes for VR. Oculus and Vive won't even RUN on a Mac, and Google and Microsoft are jumping into the lead by providing support and research. Every platform is moving ahead... except Apple's.

    And here's yet another service that Apple rolled out to huge fanfare... and is now folding.

    I'd like to think that the forthcoming WWDC will make all of this right, but I'm not holding my breath...
    hjmnl
  • Reply 4 of 6
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,135member
    Glad iAd is going away!!! You know what I hate is FREE App's. Or should I say so called FREE App's with In-App purchases. I'd rather pay for the game up front and have a full working game without the limitations and whatnot, basically forcing a person to pay a bunch of money. So I generally won't download anything that has In-App purchases anymore. Part of the problem is APPLE and how they do things which helped create this type of system. Because you can't just download a DEMO version of a program and then pay for a full version. Best they can do is a free version posted and a Paid version posted. So you're downloading again if you want the paid version. The other issue is no Upgrade path. Say you paid for Tweetbot 2, then Tweetbot 3 comes out. You can't pay a upgrade price, so you are forced to pay FULL PRICE just like any new users. The Developers have to set a lower new user price, in the hope it's low enough that others with a older version will upgrade. This is a big problem for Developers where it's just free upgrades forever, or you have to post a new version and everyone pays again full price for it if they want it. Siri needs to open up and same goes with NFC with API's.
  • Reply 5 of 6
    hjmnlhjmnl Posts: 31member
    hmlongco said:
    With Siri, Apple has basically thrown away 4 years of lead time and let Amazon and Google catch up -- and in some places even surpass -- Apple's first-mover status. 

    I'm an Apple iOS developer, and I can't tell you how disappointed I was when last year's WWDC ended without a single mention of a Siri API.

    Same goes for VR. Oculus and Vive won't even RUN on a Mac, and Google and Microsoft are jumping into the lead by providing support and research. Every platform is moving ahead... except Apple's.

    And here's yet another service that Apple rolled out to huge fanfare... and is now folding.

    I'd like to think that the forthcoming WWDC will make all of this right, but I'm not holding my breath...
    I hear you and I totally agree. I see video professionals abandoning the Mac in droves. No new MacPro since 2013. If apple wants to be premium again, they've to invest their massive earnings (= our money we've spend on Apple products) in hard- and software to be the best again. Their prices aren't justified for what you get at the moment. Siri is getting leapfrogged by Google now etc. Their hardware is getting more form over function and there sevices suck compared to the competition. This isn't the company I was very proud of anymore. It makes me angry and sad.
  • Reply 6 of 6
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,224moderator
    Apple's iAd platform launched in 2010 as a means of leveraging the company's massive installed customer base. While investors had high hoped for the service, a series of strategic fumbles, from expensive pricing tiers to burdensome restrictions, drove potential advertisers to competitors. In January, shortly before Apple announced the iAd App Network closure, BuzzFeed reported that the company planned to exit the ad selling business, and would dramatically scale back iAd operations.
    They could have gone a pretty simple route with iAd and avoided having a whole complex certification process as well as iAd producer software with as many different ad types. A lot of developers are low-end developers and just want a simple way to make money. They could have just had a check-box on submitting an app to the App Store that said "enable ads on this app" and that's it, zero work in XCode. What would then happen is when the application loaded, the operating system would pull a splash screen up on loading the app e.g:



    It would show a random splash screen pulled from multiple advertisers, matched to the app being launched for better conversion rates. To get more info about the ad, tap the info button, otherwise tap anywhere to dismiss. This wouldn't load when multi-tasking but it would load every time the app is launching the first time or at least once every set period of time e.g once every half hour at most each time the app is made active, even if the app had been left open and the device wakes.

    This is so much simpler for advertisers too as they just make a single cool looking splash image, possibly animated if they want and have the info button as a link to their website or app or it can popup a text box to give info about a promotion, new product or whatever they want. It can optionally have a button in the popup to allow the buyer to pay to turn off ads.

    People will sign on for something that's simple and you can't get much simpler than saying to a developer, write whatever app you want and click a single check-box on submitting the app to earn money. It might not make as much money as other ad methods that would perhaps show ads more frequently but developers wouldn't need to learn a single API and it would be an ad setup that doesn't interfere with the app usage like a banner taking up a portion of the display and distracting the user. It can be used alongside other ad setups if the developer wanted more.

    This could be used for their News app too where on loading an article, these same splash ads are shown.

    Developer earnings would be around $1-5 per 1,000 views. Apple has 1 billion active devices. If each user sees on average two ads per day, that's $2-10m per day in earnings for developers or $0.73-3.65b per year. Apple pays out around $10b to developers per year so it's lower than IAPs but IAPs are not a one-click solution and are harder to encourage users to pay for.

    The analytics sites suggest ad revenue is just below IAP revenue and sits around $20-30b for multiple platforms:



    If Apple is paying out $10b, their platform revenue would be ~$14b. They'd only make a portion of the available $20-30b ad revenue that aligns with their userbase size. Completely abandoning ~$10b potential ad revenue isn't necessary, they can just scale it down to a one-click solution that will offer a portion of that revenue. It's easy for developers, easy for advertisers and it will make money without much involvement.
    edited May 2016
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