Pokemon Go rolls out to iOS App Store, available in select US locations

Posted:
in iPhone edited July 2016
Nintendo and Niantic Labs on Tuesday surprised with a limited rollout of anticipated augmented reality game Pok?mon Go, making the title available for download in Australia, New Zealand and certain U.S. markets.




Pok?mon Go uses smartphone camera and GPS hardware to create an augmented reality world in which players can capture, collect, trade and battle Pok?mon. The app launch has been confirmed in Australia and New Zealand for both iOS and Android, while some U.S. App Store customers are also reporting immediate availability.

Developed by Niantic, the app puts players in the shoes of a Pok?mon trainer who, armed with an iPhone-cum-Pok? Ball, roams their city in search of the elusive creatures. As a user travels around the real world their iPhone vibrates to alert them of nearby Pok?mon that can viewed and captured onscreen.

Trainers can also find characters congregating at Pok?Stops that correlate with real life landmarks and events. The Pok?mon Company says these hotspots range from art installations to historical markers and monuments.

Location aware technology is central to the game's mechanics. For example, certain Pok?mon, like water-type characters, can only be captured near bodies of water, meaning players have to travel outside to find new species. In fact, the entire app incentivizes motion. Pok?mon Eggs, discoverable at Pok?Stops, only hatch after players walk a preset distance.

Like other games in the series, Pok?mon Go features a multiplayer element that pits teams of characters against each other in virtual battle. The goal is to take control of "gyms" scattered throughout the world. Players can assign Pok?mon to hold and defend an empty gym, or elect to attack an occupied gym using their cadre of collected characters.




Nintendo is also marketing an optional wearable device that keeps users in the game without requiring constant access to their phone. Called Go Plus, the add-on connects to a smartphone via Bluetooth and uses vibration and LED alerts to notify players of in game events, such as nearby Pok?mon sightings.

Depending on local availability, Pok?mon Go can be downloaded for free from the iOS App Store. The $35 Pok?mon Go Plus device is expected for release later this month.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    Your link at the end attached to "downloaded for free" is not working!
  • Reply 2 of 13
    lolliverlolliver Posts: 320member
    Your link at the end attached to "downloaded for free" is not working!

    That links looks like it's for the NZ app store. Might not work if your in a different country.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,060member
    This will be the best game ever. 
    lolliver
  • Reply 4 of 13
    tokyojimutokyojimu Posts: 417member
    I wasn't aware that apps can be rolled out to a limited subset of US markets.
    tallest skilcalilolliver
  • Reply 5 of 13
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    tokyojimu said:
    I wasn't aware that apps can be rolled out to a limited subset of US markets.
    Instead of limiting content to specific areas, just have an algorithm to spread it evenly across the nation. It shouldn’t matter where you are, for heaven’s sake.

    Seems like the act itself would be an interesting application of state sovereignty, though, but that’s irrelevant until the traitors are hung and the Constitution is restored.
  • Reply 6 of 13
    tenlytenly Posts: 707member
    tokyojimu said:
    I wasn't aware that apps can be rolled out to a limited subset of US markets.
    Since the app requires real world exploration, they "could" allow everyone in the US to install the app but have it set up on the back end so that objects are only findable in selected major cities - making it useless anywhere else in the country.

    This "game" will drive people to specific locations so presumably, they need to give their sales people a chance to make sure they have sold the rights to be a game location to as many businesses as possible within each city/market they bring online.  I wonder how much revenue that will actually generate.  Brilliant strategy.  Sure hope Apple has found a way to get 30% of it! (j/k)
  • Reply 7 of 13
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Disappointed in Nintendo. Seems they've waved the white flag to Apple.

    before the app store they said their virtual console/eShop was gonna be the "iTunes of games". They released about 3 games a week and fell behind.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    Imagine going somewhere and seeing people scream at nothingness in the middle of the town, trying to catch mewtwo?
  • Reply 9 of 13
    cwingravcwingrav Posts: 78member
    cali said:
    Disappointed in Nintendo. Seems they've waved the white flag to Apple.

    before the app store they said their virtual console/eShop was gonna be the "iTunes of games". They released about 3 games a week and fell behind.
    The limited release is probably because those small markets allow them to test a very complicated approach to gaming, and the real-world tie-ins to landmarks and such. Lots to test, so NZ is a great test market. Small and remote, so bugs or startup pains don't taint future markets. Also, there is a lot going on in NZ with Augmented Reality so they might be tied in to those researchers.
    edited July 2016
  • Reply 10 of 13
    RauthaRautha Posts: 5member
    tenly said:
    tokyojimu said:
    I wasn't aware that apps can be rolled out to a limited subset of US markets.
    This "game" will drive people to specific locations so presumably, they need to give their sales people a chance to make sure they have sold the rights to be a game location to as many businesses as possible within each city/market they bring online.  I wonder how much revenue that will actually generate.  Brilliant strategy.  Sure hope Apple has found a way to get 30% of it! (j/k)
    Does not work that way. Unless post offices, libraries, statues and other works of art (POI) in an area are selling stuff to people.

    The game is build on Ingress data that has already been in place for 3 years (user submitted places of interest). Their revenue will come from the wrist thing and in app purchases of EXP boosts and Pokemon lures.


    lolliver
  • Reply 11 of 13
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    cali said:
    Disappointed in Nintendo. Seems they've waved the white flag to Apple.

    before the app store they said their virtual console/eShop was gonna be the "iTunes of games". They released about 3 games a week and fell behind.
    This game is a collaboration between "Nintendo" (more on that later) and Niantic Labs, a former Google Moonshot project that was spun off as its own company as part of the Alphabet reorg. As Niantic owns the technology required to make this game, you know, actually work, it was either partner with them to create this amazing concept based on their IP so that it could be played on iOS and Android phones, or not release it at all. Also, technically Pokemon is not a property. Even though they release their console games exclusively through Nintendo, the IP is actually owned and the games most often developed by Game Freak, with the Pokemon Company being a holding/rights company co-owned by by Nintendo and Game Freak to handle licensing and distribution. So for Pokemon games, Nintendo is merely their exclusive distributor. Or actually, mostly their exclusive distributor, as there has been a mobile Pokemon game, Pokemon Shuffle, available on iOS and Android for over a year (though it is only a match puzzle game). But that is why that Miimoto was the first Nintendo game and not Pokemon Shuffle: Pokemon is a Game Freak property. So it was almost certainly Game Freak that decided to work with Niantic to release this mobile game. Had it been up to Nintendo alone, they never would have agreed to release a game on non-Nintendo hardware that was better and more compelling than the games on their hardware. But since Game Freak wanted it, Nintendo is bound by their contract with Game Freak to work with Niantic to make it happen.
    I don't believe so. Nintendo owns enough rights to say "no".
    problem is, the people running Nintendo are a bunch of arrogant Japanese suits that have been runnning it into the ground since 2013.
    had this concept been 3DS exclusive and Nintendo announce a DS with 3G data and GPS, it would have legitimately competed
    with android and iOS, except it would
    have been different and not an iKnockoff.
    tenly said:
    This "game" will drive people to specific locations so presumably, they need to give their sales people a chance to make sure they have sold the rights to be a game location to as many businesses as possible within each city/market they bring online.  I wonder how much revenue that will actually generate.  Brilliant strategy.  Sure hope Apple has found a way to get 30% of it! (j/k)
    Does not work that way. Unless post offices, libraries, statues and other works of art (POI) in an area are selling stuff to people.

    The game is build on Ingress data that has already been in place for 3 years (user submitted places of interest). Their revenue will come from the wrist thing and in app purchases of EXP boosts and Pokemon lures.


    Ingress.... That's what I thought. Makes
    sense now.
  • Reply 12 of 13
    why-why- Posts: 305member
    tokyojimu said:
    I wasn't aware that apps can be rolled out to a limited subset of US markets.
    Instead of limiting content to specific areas, just have an algorithm to spread it evenly across the nation. It shouldn’t matter where you are, for heaven’s sake.

    Seems like the act itself would be an interesting application of state sovereignty, though, but that’s irrelevant until the traitors are hung and the Constitution is restored.
    *hanged

    also good god what is wrong with you
    edited July 2016 lolliverboopthesnoot
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