Apple Music streaming videos added to T-Mobile Binge On unlimited data

Posted:
in iPhone
T-Mobile U.S. on Tuesday added 16 more video streaming services to its unlimited data Binge On program, highlighted by Apple Music, ABC, Disney, DISH Anywhere, and Nat Geo TV.




Other services also added are the Big Ten Network, CEEK VR, Disney Jr., Disney XD, D-PAN.TV, DramaFever, Fox Now, FXNOW, Shalom World, Sioeye, and Tubi TV. As with all streaming video providers, Binge On video quality is reduced to 480p. Any content streamed does not count towards any monthly data cap.

Apple Music streaming audio already does not count against caps for subscribers to a T-Mobile Simple Choice plan.

At launch, YouTube complained that video quality was being reduced for its content, despite not being a Binge On partner. T-Mobile initially denied throttling the Google service, and blamed it on misidentification of media. The Electronic Frontier Foundation discovered that with Binge On active all played video, even that not from program partners, are cut to 1.5Mbps.

Following the EFF's discovery, T-Mobile confirmed that the company was in fact reducing the bitrate on all streamed video. The company continues to position the video downsampling for Binge On users as network optimization, and not throttling.

Google's services, including YouTube, were added in March. Today's additions bring the total of streaming video providers on Binge On to 103.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    Don't like what some companies are doing. Net Neutrality was passed in 2015. The practice they're employing, known as 'Zero-Rating', as I understand it, is an illegal practice. Unless I'm wrong, or don't understand completely. Seem to have thought wireless was bound by the FCC's decision affecting carriers; maybe they aren't considered carriers and are not affected by the FCC's ruling.
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 2 of 8
    TurboPGTTurboPGT Posts: 355member
    Don't like what some companies are doing. Net Neutrality was passed in 2015. The practice they're employing, known as 'Zero-Rating', as I understand it, is an illegal practice. Unless I'm wrong, or don't understand completely. Seem to have thought wireless was bound by the FCC's decision affecting carriers; maybe they aren't considered carriers and are not affected by the FCC's ruling.
    I'm not sure I understand it either. This certainly is not fair to other services that are not included in Binge On. How/why it is not also illegal is a mystery to me. I have a feeling if any of the smaller guys banded together and brought action against them, the tide would turn in their favor.
  • Reply 3 of 8
    TurboPGT said:
    Don't like what some companies are doing. Net Neutrality was passed in 2015. The practice they're employing, known as 'Zero-Rating', as I understand it, is an illegal practice. Unless I'm wrong, or don't understand completely. Seem to have thought wireless was bound by the FCC's decision affecting carriers; maybe they aren't considered carriers and are not affected by the FCC's ruling.
    I'm not sure I understand it either. This certainly is not fair to other services that are not included in Binge On. How/why it is not also illegal is a mystery to me. I have a feeling if any of the smaller guys banded together and brought action against them, the tide would turn in their favor.
    I have always thought wireless carriers were in a 'gray area', providing communication services, but not considered an 'ISP', and not bound by all of the FCC's rules. Net Neutrality and Zero-rating seem to be two important pieces of regulation that terrestrial / wireline companies must adhere to, but not the wireless industry, because by not being an 'ISP', they are exempt.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    dougddougd Posts: 292member
    The big problem with it though is Binge On is NOT enabled when running thru an Apple TV or even a streaming thru a Mac Pro.  TMO support says it does work with a MacBook however.  Odd isn't it ? 
  • Reply 5 of 8
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,015member
    dougd said:
    The big problem with it though is Binge On is NOT enabled when running thru an Apple TV or even a streaming thru a Mac Pro.  TMO support says it does work with a MacBook however.  Odd isn't it ? 
    I do think it would be really odd to run your internet connection for an Apple TV or Mac Pro through T-mobile. I would suspect it to be quite rare. I could see a Wifi hotspot device, tethering or using a USB cellular adapter with a MacBook though.
  • Reply 6 of 8
    pigybankpigybank Posts: 178member
    TurboPGT said:
    Don't like what some companies are doing. Net Neutrality was passed in 2015. The practice they're employing, known as 'Zero-Rating', as I understand it, is an illegal practice. Unless I'm wrong, or don't understand completely. Seem to have thought wireless was bound by the FCC's decision affecting carriers; maybe they aren't considered carriers and are not affected by the FCC's ruling.
    I'm not sure I understand it either. This certainly is not fair to other services that are not included in Binge On. How/why it is not also illegal is a mystery to me. I have a feeling if any of the smaller guys banded together and brought action against them, the tide would turn in their favor.
    Aside from the fact that I do believe mobile carriers are exempt, it would still not be illegal under my reading of the current law.  It only prohibits pay for play, or throttling of certain services over others.  I have not read where T Mobile is exchanging money with these services.  They are just unilaterally deciding to have them not count against data usage.   Furthermore, they are not throttling other services. Apple Music isn't going to stream faster than some other streaming site, etc. 
  • Reply 7 of 8
    pigybank said:
    TurboPGT said:
    I'm not sure I understand it either. This certainly is not fair to other services that are not included in Binge On. How/why it is not also illegal is a mystery to me. I have a feeling if any of the smaller guys banded together and brought action against them, the tide would turn in their favor.
    Aside from the fact that I do believe mobile carriers are exempt, it would still not be illegal under my reading of the current law.  It only prohibits pay for play, or throttling of certain services over others.  I have not read where T Mobile is exchanging money with these services.  They are just unilaterally deciding to have them not count against data usage.   Furthermore, they are not throttling other services. Apple Music isn't going to stream faster than some other streaming site, etc.
    Seriously doubt T-Mobile is allowing these services to be used as part of 'Binge On' 'just to be nice'. Would seriously think the FCC has promotions like this on its radar for being 'Zero-Rating'. Money is surely changing hands. If it's not, why doesn't T-Mobile allow all audio / video data consumption to be excluded from monthly data allotments (can't seem to help but notice the obvious absence of services like FaceTime and Skype being mentioned as being included as part of the preferential treatment).
  • Reply 8 of 8
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,464member
    You guys are ridiculous. It's pretty clear that what T-mobile is doing is "optimizing" the experience for data on mobile. That means video is limited to 480p. Audio is probably limited in some fashion as well or perhaps sent in a manner that limits network congestion. (Quickly downloads 3-4 songs and stores locally vs continual streaming.)

    T-mobile works with each provider and something is done to help save traffic on the Tmobile network. In exchange, T-mobile doesn't count the use toward the data. Seems like a win/win all around. If I'm watching Netflix or some equivalent on my phone, I can't tell the difference between 480p or 1080p. If I'm streaming 1080p for my television, I should be doing it via my home cable internet connect.
Sign In or Register to comment.