Apple touts Japanese job creation, boost to nation's economy

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2016
Apple Japan published a special informational page to its regional website on Monday detailing how the company's various hardware, software and services businesses have positively impacted the Asian nation in 2015.


Apple Store in Omotesando, Tokyo.


According to Apple's own tally, it has created some 715,000 jobs in Japan either through direct employment or as it relates to hardware suppliers, app development firms and other related companies. The Yomiuri Shimbun mentioned the data in a report earlier today, which was later picked up by Japanese language Apple blog Mac Otakara.

Citing data published by Dr. Michael Mandel of the Progressive Policy Institute in April, Apple reports 445,000 Japanese citizens worked in areas related to the iOS and App Store ecosystem. As a testament to the operating system's impact on the country's economy, Apple said it paid out $9.6 billion to 532,000 Japanese developers in 2015.

As for job creation, Apple currently employs 2,900 people in its stores, supply chain, operations and other corporate offices. The company staffs each of its eight Japanese Apple Stores with an average of 100 employees, most of whom work on a full-time basis.

Finally, Apple outlined its Japanese supply chain, noting 865 businesses currently provide goods and services to be used in a variety of Apple products.

For example, Kantatsu has been designing and manufacturing precision optical components for iPhone cameras since 2013, while Teikoku Printing Inks Manufacturing Co. has provided the ink used to coat iPhone bezels since the original model launched in 2007. Cashew, a small company from Omiya, was also profiled for delivering environmentally friendly anti-scratch coatings that have been used in Apple products, including iPhone, for ten years.

Apple continues to invest heavily in Japan, a key foothold in the East Asian market. Looking ahead, Apple will open a research and development center in Yokohama next year that is expected to tap into local talent specializing in materials science, vehicles and health industries.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    planktonplankton Posts: 104member
    All very good, but it would have a beneficial impact on more Japanese if AJ would pull its pants up and link the transit data for Japan's major cities of Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and the prefectural capitals, into Apple Maps someday before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics!
  • Reply 2 of 10
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,572member
    Now if we could get Apple to focus a bit on production in the USA.  
    macseeker
  • Reply 3 of 10
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,400member
    wizard69 said:
    Now if we could get Apple to focus a bit on production in the USA.  
    Why would Apple want to pay top dollar for the inferior labor force that is available in the USA? The average U.S. citizen can barely read at third grade level. Math is anathema to most Americans, let alone a work ethic. Apple would spend millions on disability and workman’s comp payments while productivity would be non existent. Now if Apple could build fully automated factories in the U.S. they might have a chance.
    magman1979JanNLfotoformatradarthekatbrucemcmessagepad2100badmonk
  • Reply 4 of 10
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    lkrupp said:
    wizard69 said:
    Now if we could get Apple to focus a bit on production in the USA.  
    Why would Apple want to pay top dollar for the inferior labor force that is available in the USA? The average U.S. citizen can barely read at third grade level. Math is anathema to most Americans, let alone a work ethic. Apple would spend millions on disability and workman’s comp payments while productivity would be non existent. Now if Apple could build fully automated factories in the U.S. they might have a chance.
    Is that a real assessment or sarcasm?  I can't even tell anymore.
    edited August 2016
  • Reply 5 of 10
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,572member
    hmm said:
    lkrupp said:
    Why would Apple want to pay top dollar for the inferior labor force that is available in the USA? The average U.S. citizen can barely read at third grade level. Math is anathema to most Americans, let alone a work ethic. Apple would spend millions on disability and workman’s comp payments while productivity would be non existent. Now if Apple could build fully automated factories in the U.S. they might have a chance.
    Is that a real assessment or sarcasm?  I can't even tell anymore.

    It is neither simply a display of ignorance.
    tallest skilhmm
  • Reply 6 of 10
    IMO, it's getting tiresome to hear companies try and take credit for jobs they didn't create directly. Yes, Apple has a positive impact on the economy outside of it's own hires, but the credit for supplier jobs or app jobs should go to the third parties themselves. It's their own initiative.
    singularity
  • Reply 7 of 10
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    lkrupp said:
    wizard69 said:
    Now if we could get Apple to focus a bit on production in the USA.  
    Why would Apple want to pay top dollar for the inferior labor force that is available in the USA? The average U.S. citizen can barely read at third grade level. Math is anathema to most Americans, let alone a work ethic. Apple would spend millions on disability and workman’s comp payments while productivity would be non existent. Now if Apple could build fully automated factories in the U.S. they might have a chance.
    It's most likely that most of the processors in your i devices were made in Samsung's Austin factory.  Who work there, fish?
    afrodri
  • Reply 8 of 10
    cnocbui said:
    lkrupp said:
    Why would Apple want to pay top dollar for the inferior labor force that is available in the USA? The average U.S. citizen can barely read at third grade level. Math is anathema to most Americans, let alone a work ethic. Apple would spend millions on disability and workman’s comp payments while productivity would be non existent. Now if Apple could build fully automated factories in the U.S. they might have a chance.
    It's most likely that most of the processors in your i devices were made in Samsung's Austin factory.  Who work there, fish?
    Robots.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    cnocbui said:
    It's most likely that most of the processors in your i devices were made in Samsung's Austin factory.  Who work there, fish?
    Robots.
    Yes, the factory is automated. But there are also employed people there. And the factory is in America, unless Texas decides it doesn't want to be part of the Union and secedes again. 
  • Reply 10 of 10
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    wizard69 said:
    Now if we could get Apple to focus a bit on production in the USA.  
    The numbers here would be even more astounding. No need to produce here until robotics take over manufacturing 
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