FaceTime video chat competitor Google Duo released for iOS, Android

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 38
    paxman said:
    Google taking a page out of Samsung's playbook.

    Throw anything at the wall and see what sticks.
    I can't speak to the confusion caused by the alleged multiple services performing the same or similar functionality, but it makes sense for Google to offer a FaceTime replica that supports Android. There are a lot of Android owners out there and I am sure a good portion of them want FaceTime functionality and easy of use and quality. Given that Duo gives them that any FaceTime user who also communicates with Android user will obviously move over to Duo. This is where proprietary technology becomes a problem rather than a solution.
    Thats why I have felt that it would be a smart thing for Apple to release a version for android. I know there are many naysayers to this, but I feel that releasing it for android is a necessity in todays cross platform smartphone world. Having it on android might also make android users more curious to about iOS and iPhone via a traditionally well built iOS app from Apple. As someone who has friends who use android, one video messaging app would be ideal to use. 
    williamlondonhtatc
  • Reply 22 of 38
    holyoneholyone Posts: 398member
    Paralysis said:
    paxman said:
    I can't speak to the confusion caused by the alleged multiple services performing the same or similar functionality, but it makes sense for Google to offer a FaceTime replica that supports Android. There are a lot of Android owners out there and I am sure a good portion of them want FaceTime functionality and easy of use and quality. Given that Duo gives them that any FaceTime user who also communicates with Android user will obviously move over to Duo. This is where proprietary technology becomes a problem rather than a solution.
    Thats why I have felt that it would be a smart thing for Apple to release a version for android. I know there are many naysayers to this, but I feel that releasing it for android is a necessity in todays cross platform smartphone world. Having it on android might also make android users more curious to about iOS and iPhone via a traditionally well built iOS app from Apple. As someone who has friends who use android, one video messaging app would be ideal to use. 
    I kind of felt the same in the pre event rumors off WWDC 16 when people were predicting iMassage on android then realized that the reason apple might never do non revenue generating cross platform is that if android users had Face Time or iMassage and experience the level of quality that apple provides those good experiences and positive association would not transfer to apple but to whatever device throughwhich those feeling where delivered thus essentially apple would be shooting it self in the foot and giving less reson for migration to IOS. That was my conclusion
    lostkiwihtatc
  • Reply 23 of 38
    cnocbui said:
    Charles Darwin wrote a book about the effectiveness of throwing stuff at a wall and seeing what sticks.  He concluded it works rather well.
    I wonder how many people actually know where that saying comes from? It's supposed to be 'spaghetti thrown at a wall'  because when it's properly cooked it'll stick but not before. 
    Yeah. I feel the same way about the "Drinking the Kool-aid" trolling line too.

    The followers of Jim Jones died when they drank the poisoned Flavor-Aid in Jonestown. They didn't become more fervent followers, they already did everything he asked.
    dasanman69
  • Reply 24 of 38
    cnocbui said:
    Google taking a page out of Samsung's playbook.

    Throw anything at the wall and see what sticks.
    Charles Darwin wrote a book about the effectiveness of throwing stuff at a wall and seeing what sticks.  He concluded it works rather well.
    You're behind the times brother. Darwin's assumptions and theories are under constant bombardment for the last 20 years. They aren't holding so true like we once assumed. 
  • Reply 25 of 38
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,678member
    holyone said:
    Paralysis said:
    Thats why I have felt that it would be a smart thing for Apple to release a version for android. I know there are many naysayers to this, but I feel that releasing it for android is a necessity in todays cross platform smartphone world. Having it on android might also make android users more curious to about iOS and iPhone via a traditionally well built iOS app from Apple. As someone who has friends who use android, one video messaging app would be ideal to use. 
    I kind of felt the same in the pre event rumors off WWDC 16 when people were predicting iMassage on android then realized that the reason apple might never do non revenue generating cross platform is that if android users had Face Time or iMassage and experience the level of quality that apple provides those good experiences and positive association would not transfer to apple but to whatever device throughwhich those feeling where delivered thus essentially apple would be shooting it self in the foot and giving less reson for migration to IOS. That was my conclusion
    When Apple brought iTunes and through that, the iPod to Windows, it was a game changer. For Apple. I'd like to think that for the most part Apple wins on merit and not through exclusion. There are so many platform agnostic messaging services out there that to keep iMessage exclusively Apple seems a little pointless by now. In fact I'd wager it is counter productive.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 26 of 38
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    Not available outside the US? At least not on the Canadian App Store (iOS). 
  • Reply 27 of 38
    holyoneholyone Posts: 398member
    paxman said:
    holyone said:
    I kind of felt the same in the pre event rumors off WWDC 16 when people were predicting iMassage on android then realized that the reason apple might never do non revenue generating cross platform is that if android users had Face Time or iMassage and experience the level of quality that apple provides those good experiences and positive association would not transfer to apple but to whatever device throughwhich those feeling where delivered thus essentially apple would be shooting it self in the foot and giving less reson for migration to IOS. That was my conclusion
    When Apple brought iTunes and through that, the iPod to Windows, it was a game changer. For Apple. I'd like to think that for the most part Apple wins on merit and not through exclusion. There are so many platform agnostic messaging services out there that to keep iMessage exclusively Apple seems a little pointless by now. In fact I'd wager it is counter productive.
    But you have to remember that apple was in a deferent position back than there was nothing any where close to iPhone then and most people due to MS PC dominance most iPod users had windows machines and apple really couldn't and wasn't competing in that area specifically so that stood to reap real benefit in the mainstream adoption of what was a very new and expensive magic thing from apple I think any such strategy now would not yield as much benefit and there are downsides as I've mentioned such a loosing persuasive factors that are driving android switchers today, apple has always held a position of prestige primarily because of it's exclusivity that I think is far more important than some minor benefit it might extract from porting its platforms, also apple's mantra is best not most I doubt apple would flourish as much if it was in the hands of everyone. Also another point that is rarely raised is that it's almost pointless for apple to port because there are so few devices that run well enough to fully translate and replicate the apple experience and apple sells all the premium devices suitable for the full apple experience But I understand you're position
  • Reply 28 of 38
    gatorguy said:
    That "pre-call viewing" / knock-knock video stream is just dumb. It's basically not fair, if that makes sense. Until both parties agree to chat, no one should be visible. It is just weird to have one party able to sit there and "spy" on the call-initiating party. I think that in that way it is kind of creepy. It was a bizarre decision that I think Google made solely as a way to differentiate, not as a way to improve on video calling.
    EXAMPLE: You get a video chat invite from an unknown number. You've just stepped out of the shower. Dang sure ain't taking that one... until you see it's your wife. Oh, well then that's OK. 
    From what I've read, if it's an unknown number, you won't get the knock knock video. They say it's to prevent, e.g. me getting out of the shower and calling you randomly and ruining your night with my knock knock. I guess etiquette would suggest people become contacts before initiating a duo call.

    Google said the reason for knock knock is to reduce the unease of answering a video call, and all the "can you see me?" questions at the beginning.
  • Reply 29 of 38
    anomeanome Posts: 1,465member
    Announced at the same time as Duo in May was Google's Allo chat service. Allo is not yet available.

    Google Duo is available now, requires iOS 9 or greater, and occupies 28.2MB of device storage space.

    Duo and Allo? Is the combined service called "Allo Allo"? If so, does it make everyone sound like they're talking with an outrageous French Accent?

    "Listen carefully, I will say this only once..."

  • Reply 30 of 38
    Wait... I thought Google Hangouts is the FaceTime competitor. And now Google Duo? Boy, Google has lots of money to throw away.
    edited August 2016
  • Reply 31 of 38
    cnocbui said:
    Charles Darwin wrote a book about the effectiveness of throwing stuff at a wall and seeing what sticks.  He concluded it works rather well.
    You're behind the times brother. Darwin's assumptions and theories are under constant bombardment for the last 20 years. They aren't holding so true like we once assumed. 
    You've had too much spliff or you must be new to science. The opposite is true, if anything. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 32 of 38
    croprcropr Posts: 1,053member
    holyone said:
    Paralysis said:
    Thats why I have felt that it would be a smart thing for Apple to release a version for android. I know there are many naysayers to this, but I feel that releasing it for android is a necessity in todays cross platform smartphone world. Having it on android might also make android users more curious to about iOS and iPhone via a traditionally well built iOS app from Apple. As someone who has friends who use android, one video messaging app would be ideal to use. 
    I kind of felt the same in the pre event rumors off WWDC 16 when people were predicting iMassage on android then realized that the reason apple might never do non revenue generating cross platform is that if android users had Face Time or iMassage and experience the level of quality that apple provides those good experiences and positive association would not transfer to apple but to whatever device throughwhich those feeling where delivered thus essentially apple would be shooting it self in the foot and giving less reson for migration to IOS. That was my conclusion
    It depends on market share.  I am living in a country where iOS has a 15% market share. After the initial testing when I bought my first iPhone, I stopped using FaceTime because the chances were too low that person I want to speak to, had also a FaceTime enabled device.  After a while I unconsciously moved my habits and I was no longer considering FaceTime as a possible communication app, even if I had to talk to an iPhone user.  Currently FaceTime has become part of 'garbage apps' folder in the upper right screen of my iPhone, just occupying valuable memory 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 33 of 38
    Well, I use FaceTime daily and am very happy with the product. I see no reason for a second one, all my friends have iPhones, I am a MAC :)
  • Reply 34 of 38
    ration al said:
    Yeah. I feel the same way about the "Drinking the Kool-aid" trolling line too.

    The followers of Jim Jones died when they drank the poisoned Flavor-Aid in Jonestown. They didn't become more fervent followers, they already did everything he asked.


    Yeah, people who use that one always creep me out.  I mean, do you know that that means?  Were you alive when that happened?  Did you see the images?

    I can't imagine anyone who actually saw what happened is really comfortable when they hear that one.

  • Reply 35 of 38
    Paralysis said:
    Thats why I have felt that it would be a smart thing for Apple to release a version for android. I know there are many naysayers to this, but I feel that releasing it for android is a necessity in todays cross platform smartphone world. Having it on android might also make android users more curious to about iOS and iPhone via a traditionally well built iOS app from Apple. As someone who has friends who use android, one video messaging app would be ideal to use. 
    At its heart, Apple makes money selling hardware. It is slowly adding services like Apple Music and such to add profits, but every decision it makes is to move more hardware. Having iMessage and Facetime just on Apple hardware is their way of selling the advantage of staying in the Apple Ecosystem. 

  • Reply 36 of 38
    elijahg said:

    Apple did promise to open the FaceTime API when it was introduced, but no cigar. Unfortunately a communications platform just doesn't work unless it's cross platform, you can't restrict yourself to only calling iOS device owners! iMessage has automatic fallback so not so much of a problem cross platform. 
    Apple had to change how FaceTime worked after a patent lawsuit. They changed it from being peer to peer to being relayed through a server. Peer to peer would have allowed them to open it up for anyone without having to incur data transport costs. I suspect it being relayed is also the reason why it remains closed. 
    elijahg
  • Reply 37 of 38
    Paralysis said:
    At its heart, Apple makes money selling hardware. It is slowly adding services like Apple Music and such to add profits, but every decision it makes is to move more hardware. Having iMessage and Facetime just on Apple hardware is their way of selling the advantage of staying in the Apple Ecosystem. 

    Looking at it another way, I can't talk to friends with FaceTime who don't have Apple devices, essentially meaning the product is less valuable to me. Looking at it in still another way, someone who has lots of friends not on Apple has no incentive to go to Apple if once doing so means they can't use the base functionality provided by Apple to communicate to their friends, which they do with their current equipment. This, "let's keep it in Apple's ecosystem" argument isn't very strong in my opinion and actually goes against the original intention of FaceTime, which was to be an open standard such that it could become the de facto video calling app people used, regardless of system. Patent conflicts I think killed that plan, but the vision was written at the time it was launched, there was never any intention of keeping it all Apple only.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 38 of 38
    At its heart, Apple makes money selling hardware. It is slowly adding services like Apple Music and such to add profits, but every decision it makes is to move more hardware. Having iMessage and Facetime just on Apple hardware is their way of selling the advantage of staying in the Apple Ecosystem. 

    Looking at it another way, I can't talk to friends with FaceTime who don't have Apple devices, essentially meaning the product is less valuable to me. Looking at it in still another way, someone who has lots of friends not on Apple has no incentive to go to Apple if once doing so means they can't use the base functionality provided by Apple to communicate to their friends, which they do with their current equipment. This, "let's keep it in Apple's ecosystem" argument isn't very strong in my opinion and actually goes against the original intention of FaceTime, which was to be an open standard such that it could become the de facto video calling app people used, regardless of system. Patent conflicts I think killed that plan, but the vision was written at the time it was launched, there was never any intention of keeping it all Apple only.
    Yes, at one point FaceTime was suppose to be open. But we all see how that went. :(

    williamlondon
Sign In or Register to comment.