DJI's Osmo Mobile swaps dedicated camera for iPhone to capture gimbal-stabilized shots

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2016
Just days after announcing the Osmo+, DJI on Thursday launched yet another handheld stabilizer, the Osmo Mobile, substituting a dedicated camera with a user's own smartphone.




The Mobile pairs via Bluetooth, and holds phones in a grip, which should work with any recent iOS or Android device with a width between 2.31 and 3.34 inches. In terms of iPhones, this ranges from the iPhone 5 through to the iPhone 6s Plus. Once locked in the gimbal offers the same stabilization found in other Osmo models and the company's aerial drones.

While shooting is partly dependent on the DJI Go app, the handle does offer controls for shooting, changing modes, and flipping between front and rear cameras. Advanced settings like ISO and shutter speed can be accessed via the iPhone's touchscreen.

The Mobile can be set to operate in four different orientations, including Standard, Portrait, Flashlight, and Underslung.




The app enables most of the same shooting functions as other Osmos, including ActiveTrack, motion timelapses, live streaming, and panoramas.

The Osmo Mobile's three-axis stabilization is claimed to increase precision down to 0.03 degrees of accuracy. Together with DJI SmoothTrack on its iOS app, users should be able to capture smooth shots directly on their iPhone.

Key features of the Osmo Mobile, according to DJI, include:

  • Three-axis stabilization
  • Intelligent SmoothTrack
  • User-friendly DJI GO App with powerful functions (including ActiveTrack, Motion Time lapse, Live Stream, Panorama, Long Exposure, Camera Settings)
  • Trigger control (double-tap for re-center, triple-tap to change between front and rear-end camera, long press for locking gimbal direction)
  • Different operation modes (Standard, Portrait, Flashlight and Underslung)
  • Bluetooth connection
  • 3.5-millimeter Charging/Upgrade Port

  • Compatible with DJI Osmo accessories





"DJI continues to revolutionize the way we capture and share memories," said Frank Wang, DJI CEO and founder. "The Osmo Mobile combines the best of DJI's beloved Osmo smart stabilization technology with the robust DJI GO app. This is a breakthrough, allowing smartphone users unprecedented control of and creative possibilities for their devices."

The Osmo Mobile is shipping today at a price of $299.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    roakeroake Posts: 814member
    Kinda awesome!
    schlack
  • Reply 2 of 14
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,257member
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
  • Reply 3 of 14
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,205member
    Much safer when your Note explodes.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 4 of 14
    Kinda useless, compared to a cheaper Z1-Smooth or similar:

    1) gimbal is permanently attached, no way to swap it for X5 (or X3) when you have time to prepare and get a better quality shot. It would give you more options and save weight and space in your gear bag.
    2) recording only through dedicated app, which takes time to start up and connect. Photos app opens up momentarily and is not cluttered with gimbal controls. I can get Filmic and get even better quality recording without the need to pair and connect to a simple (but not worse or less stabilizing) gimbal.

    They should have given an option for X3/X5 owners to add just M1 gimbal to their existing setup, and let us use the iPhone recording features with and without their app. That would be awesome.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 5 of 14
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 6 of 14
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    dementuschikan
  • Reply 7 of 14
    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    Thanks! Looking forward to your/AI's review of the Osmo Mobile!
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 8 of 14
    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    Thanks! Looking forward to your/AI's review of the Osmo Mobile!
    I'm drooling over the thought of this, a 256GB iPhone 7 Plus with dual-lens camera, and an external Lightning mic. Talk about an ultra capable, powerful and portable way to shoot.
    dementuschikanJimmy_B
  • Reply 9 of 14
    I've just ordered mine and am looking forward to using this with an iphone 7...just not quite sure how the new iphone will work with external mics...hopefully an adaptor will emerge!
  • Reply 10 of 14
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,257member
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    It would help if I proofread my comments. I meant to say "just without the stabilization" not "with." I've had a Grip&Shoot for a few years and use it on occasion. It still doesn't work with Apple's Camera app, which they were hoping it would. Regardless, the Bluetooth grip and iPhone holder are 1/3 the cost of the Osmo, which is still hefty for a simple grip.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,257member

    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    The Grip&Shoot has it's own free app but it also works with 645 PRO (http://gripandshoot.com/apps.html) and two other apps. Does the Osmo require its proprietary app or does it work with other camera apps? I'm not saying Grip&Shoot is better than the Osmo, I'm just saying I feel the Osmo costs too much.
  • Reply 12 of 14
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member
    rob53 said:

    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    The Grip&Shoot has it's own free app but it also works with 645 PRO (http://gripandshoot.com/apps.html) and two other apps. Does the Osmo require its proprietary app or does it work with other camera apps? I'm not saying Grip&Shoot is better than the Osmo, I'm just saying I feel the Osmo costs too much.

    It seems like you may be misunderstanding what the Osmo does - it's an active 3-axis gimbal - completely different and far more advanced than the other (passive) stabilizers that you mentioned. I'm not aware that there is anything else out there that will do this for a smartphone camera, so I'm not clear on what basis you think it is too expensive.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    rob53 said:

    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    The Grip&Shoot has it's own free app but it also works with 645 PRO (http://gripandshoot.com/apps.html) and two other apps. Does the Osmo require its proprietary app or does it work with other camera apps? I'm not saying Grip&Shoot is better than the Osmo, I'm just saying I feel the Osmo costs too much.
    The Osmo will work with the DJI Go app and other third party apps. Filmic Pro has an Osmo option installed already
  • Reply 14 of 14
    muppetry said:
    rob53 said:

    nhughes said:
    rob53 said:
    The "Academy Award winning Steadicam stabilizing technology" Smoothee mount is $150 but doesn't include the remote capabilities. This is a time-tested product line used by professional videographers every day. It uses a lower counterweight to assist in the stabilization. I don't see how the Osmo could compare. They must be doing a lot of gyro realignment within that small mount.

    http://tiffen.com/steadicamsmoothee/

    I also wish accessories like this didn't cost so much when they don't need to. Say it works with an iPhone and it immediately costs 10x what it should. The Grip&Shoot, http://gripandshoot.com/buynow.html, is the same kind of Bluetooth remote phone holder, just with the stabilization, and it only costs $100. 
    I checked the GripAndShoot, and it doesn't appear to actually be steadying tech? It appears to be a pistol grip that should make it more comfortable to hold the camera and reduce shaking, but it isn't actually gimble/weight-balance technology. It does have some other cool features, like being able to break out to a tripod and remote control configuration.

    The SteadiCam Smoothee is entirely different tech than the Osmo. People will have to judge for themselves if the way it handles balancing or the way Osmo and similar devices do it is better and worth the price differences. (And that's before mentioning features like active tracking and motion timelapse.)

    Check out iPhoneDo on Youtube (http://bit.ly/2bFsg4O). He just put up a review of the Osmo Mobile today, and there is an older video where he compares the Steadicam Smoothee vs Feiyu G4 Pro.
    The Grip & Shoot does not stabilize, it's just a Bluetooth shutter trigger (that requires a proprietary app). I reviewed it here:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/09/05/review-gripshoot-iphone-camera-grip-with-bluetooth-shutter-trigger
    The Grip&Shoot has it's own free app but it also works with 645 PRO (http://gripandshoot.com/apps.html) and two other apps. Does the Osmo require its proprietary app or does it work with other camera apps? I'm not saying Grip&Shoot is better than the Osmo, I'm just saying I feel the Osmo costs too much.

    It seems like you may be misunderstanding what the Osmo does - it's an active 3-axis gimbal - completely different and far more advanced than the other (passive) stabilizers that you mentioned. I'm not aware that there is anything else out there that will do this for a smartphone camera, so I'm not clear on what basis you think it is too expensive.
    There are a few three-axis gimbals on the market that work with iPhone and other smartphones (they must be calibrated to the weight of the specific device, of course). They generally cost anywhere from $250 up to $600-ish. So the DJI Osmo Mobile is certainly competitive in that respect. But arguably the integration with the DJI app, with its lock-on-object capabilities, makes this product far more capable than those other gimbal-only solutions. Of course, assuming the DJI Osmo Mobile doesn't work with Apple's own Camera app and various third-party apps, that's also a detriment.

    Here is this product's chief competition:

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1110936-REG/ikan_fly_x3_plus_3_axis_smartphone_gimbal_stabilizer.html
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