Pro photographer tests iPhone 7 Plus cameras at US Open, finds they perform 'exceedingly well'

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 38
    irelandireland Posts: 17,571member
    dougd said:
    As usual a bunch of arm chair experts commenting
    Ever notice the so-called experts seem to be a grumpy bunch?
  • Reply 22 of 38
    irelandireland Posts: 17,571member
    if you dont care what we think of *your* work, then why the F do you think anyone here should care about your personal opinion of this guy's work? what possible relevance could your opinion of his work hold for me or anyone else here?

    please explain your position, because at this point you seem like just another random hypocrite.
    Arguing against the follow point was nonsensical. His claim that many amateurs have a signature style is ludicrous.
    Nordeman was able to execute his signature style -- surprising moments from unique perspectives
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 23 of 38
    larz2112 said:
    nhughes said:
    larz2112 said:
    Haha! It's funny to see what people consider "professional photography" these days.  "Nordeman was able to execute his signature style -- surprising moments from unique perspectives" That's a pretty common "style", even for many amateurs. Nothing unique about it. I guess if you have ever received payment for even one photo you are considered a "professional photographer", even if you have no clue what an f-stop is. Regarding the new camera, I don't really see much depth of field in the sample photos. I was hoping it would be a little more prominent. I'm waiting until next year to upgrade my 5S, so hopefully the camera will be even better in a year.
    Nordeman has shot for ESPN, Time, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair and Vogue, to name a few. Are you really suggesting that he shouldn't be called a professional photographer? Get real.
    Yes, my OPINION is that the quality and composition of his photography (not just here but in his portfolio) is more in line with an amateur. As I stated in my original comment, it seems the benchmark these days for being considered "professional" is if you have sold your work, and not on the quality of the content. There are now apps that let any schmuck sell a picture to their local news station or as a stock photo. So I guess whoever does that is a "professional photographer". 

    Sorry if my opinion runs counter to yours. 
    Who cares what title you give him, the images look like point and shoot. You are right about that.
  • Reply 24 of 38
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,782member
    mcfrazieriv said:
    Who cares what title you give him, the images look like point and shoot. You are right about that.
    An iPhone is a point and shoot camera. If you are talking about the composition of the photos, that is subjective. There is only so much you can do with a lightweight hand held camera with a tiny aperture lens. He is primarily an event photographer, not in a studio, not staged, not on set, so yeah, you try to capture the moment...point and shoot.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 25 of 38
    if you dont care what we think of *your* work, then why the F do you think anyone here should care about your personal opinion of this guy's work? what possible relevance could your opinion of his work hold for me or anyone else here?

    please explain your position, because at this point you seem like just another random hypocrite.
    Umm, I don't expect anyone to care what I think, but obviously it seems like people do. I was simply posting a comment and my opinion in the comments section of an article, which is pretty much what the comment section is for. When you publicly release your creative endeavors, critical feedback is part of the game. My comments are are just as relevant or irrelevant as yours or anyone else's. So basically, you are criticizing me for posting my criticism. That's somewhat ironic, and some may even say hypocritical, kind of like folks who will not tolerate intolerance.

    The Emperor's New Clothes: A parable about something widely accepted as true or professed as being praiseworthy due to an unwillingness of the general population to criticize it or be seen as going against popular opinion.
  • Reply 26 of 38
    volcan said:
    mcfrazieriv said:
    Who cares what title you give him, the images look like point and shoot. You are right about that.
    An iPhone is a point and shoot camera. If you are talking about the composition of the photos, that is subjective. There is only so much you can do with a lightweight hand held camera with a tiny aperture lens. He is primarily an event photographer, not in a studio, not staged, not on set, so yeah, you try to capture the moment...point and shoot.
    Yes, there is only so much a talented person can do without professional gear. Take, for example, this guy...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWPysY0Wis0

    or these shots taken with point and shoot cameras...
    https://iso.500px.com/15-awesome-photos-captured-on-point-shoot-cameras/
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 27 of 38
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,782member
    larz2112 said:
    Yes, there is only so much a talented person can do without professional gear. Take, for example, this guy...
    Good example. Totally mediocre results from an otherwise talented musician. Would have sounded fantastic on professional equipment.
  • Reply 28 of 38
    volcan said:
    larz2112 said:
    Yes, there is only so much a talented person can do without professional gear. Take, for example, this guy...
    Good example. Totally mediocre results from an otherwise talented musician. Would have sounded fantastic on professional equipment.
    The point is that if you gave the average person that same toy guitar they would not be able to play anything close to that caliber of musicianship, but I'm fairly certain that anyone with the iPhone 7 could have easily produced images that would be virtually indistinguishable from those taken by Mr. Nordeman.
  • Reply 29 of 38
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,782member
    larz2112 said:
    The point is that if you gave the average person that same toy guitar they would not be able to play anything close to that caliber of musicianship, but I'm fairly certain that anyone with the iPhone 7 could have easily produced images that would be virtually indistinguishable from those taken by Mr. Nordeman.
    In that case we should give all the credit to Apple rather than critize Nordeman. Apple has taken all the guess work out of achieving adequate photographic results. the article is about the camera not the cameraman. That is the style he shoots, so what? Do you honestly think you could do any better trying to find interesting things to shoot at the spur of moment in a crowded event? He is just trying to capture the moment not win an Academy Award.
  • Reply 30 of 38
    volcan said:
    larz2112 said:
    The point is that if you gave the average person that same toy guitar they would not be able to play anything close to that caliber of musicianship, but I'm fairly certain that anyone with the iPhone 7 could have easily produced images that would be virtually indistinguishable from those taken by Mr. Nordeman.
    In that case we should give all the credit to Apple rather than critize Nordeman. Apple has taken all the guess work out of achieving adequate photographic results. the article is about the camera not the cameraman. That is the style he shoots, so what? Do you honestly think you could do any better trying to find interesting things to shoot at the spur of moment in a crowded event? He is just trying to capture the moment not win an Academy Award.
    When phrases like "pro photographer" and "signature style" are used, I guess I'm expecting something a little more than adequate.  Agreed that the focus should be on the quality of the camera and not the photographer. My bad. 
  • Reply 31 of 38
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,782member
    larz2112 said:
    When phrases like "pro photographer" and "signature style" are used, I guess I'm expecting something a little more than adequate.  Agreed that the focus should be on the quality of the camera and not the photographer. My bad. 
    I agree with you in some respects but there are different specialties within the pro photo industry. I have a professional photographer with many years of experience who I work with in his studio. I direct the shoots and he executes what I want, but if took him to a sports event I might as well have taken Ansel Adams. The result would be dismal, but that doesn't mean he is not professional, just not his specialty.

    I've been shooting since film in the 80s and got my first professional digital camera in the early 2000s. I think iPhone has completely surpassed those early full DSLR digital professional 6MP cameras even with big professional lenses. I'm totally ok with not having use light meters and all the manual settings that I learned in college. Eventually most humans will only know how to press the "Auto" button for just about everything.
  • Reply 32 of 38
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Reply 33 of 38
    dklebedev said:
    larz2112 said:
    Haha! It's funny to see what people consider "professional photography" these days.
    Professional is derived from profession = earns money.
    Yeah, that's what I said if you had bothered to read more than the first sentence of my comment before you posted.
    "I guess if you have ever received payment for even one photo you are considered a 'professional photographer'..."
  • Reply 34 of 38
    Snobbery aside, a professional is someone who gets paid for his work. Period. 

    A professional photographer once told me had only two advantages over amateurs -- he owned better equipment, and he had access to places most people couldn't go. Two years later, he was killed in one of those places. I lived, because of a fluke -- I missed my commercial flight down to join him. 

    I was one of several subjects on a location portrait shoot for a major magazine last year. (I don't think the article will be used due to some intervening events.) I was amazed by the amount of equipment the photographer brought along. He told us that all those millions of cell phone cameras had really forced him to up his game. In the past, he could have gone out with just a camera bag. Now, he needs to bring along a complete portable studio in order to have an edge. 

    A professional photographer with with a cellphone camera is competing directly with the amateurs. The only things that set him apart are his press pass, which allows him to go places most people can't, and his experience and talent, which allow him to see opportunities for shots which most people don't. But even an untalented might happen on the same shot by random chance -- which will happen quite often, with millions of amateurs snapping pictures. And not all amateurs are lacking in talent. 

    There's nothing magical about professional photography. As John Ford said about his films, "It's just a job of work." 
  • Reply 35 of 38
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Reply 36 of 38
    dklebedev said:
    Not in my book. But get your drift. People use "professional" as in "highest quality". 
    Not highest quality, just quality customers are willing to pay for. 
  • Reply 37 of 38
    lonestar1 said:
    Snobbery aside, a professional is someone who gets paid for his work. Period. 

    A professional photographer once told me had only two advantages over amateurs -- he owned better equipment, and he had access to places most people couldn't go. Two years later, he was killed in one of those places. I lived, because of a fluke -- I missed my commercial flight down to join him. 

    I was one of several subjects on a location portrait shoot for a major magazine last year. (I don't think the article will be used due to some intervening events.) I was amazed by the amount of equipment the photographer brought along. He told us that all those millions of cell phone cameras had really forced him to up his game. In the past, he could have gone out with just a camera bag. Now, he needs to bring along a complete portable studio in order to have an edge. 

    A professional photographer with with a cellphone camera is competing directly with the amateurs. The only things that set him apart are his press pass, which allows him to go places most people can't, and his experience and talent, which allow him to see opportunities for shots which most people don't. But even an untalented might happen on the same shot by random chance -- which will happen quite often, with millions of amateurs snapping pictures. And not all amateurs are lacking in talent. 

    There's nothing magical about professional photography. As John Ford said about his films, "It's just a job of work." 
    Where was this photographer killed?
  • Reply 38 of 38
    Where was this photographer killed?
    In the back of a camera plane that got too close to the jet fighter it was photographing. 
Sign In or Register to comment.