Launch day iPhone 7 Plus, jet black iPhone 7 allotment sold out, Apple says

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 140
    Wow! Very impressive! I pre-ordered my 7 Plus in black, 256GB AT 3am sharp local time (Eastern zone) and delivery was already a week out! So I won't get mine til Sept 23-27
    cali
  • Reply 22 of 140
    It seriously amazes me that Apple always seems to be supply constrained these days considering a supply chain guru is CEO and his right hand operations man is COO. I mean the Jet Black phone was out of stock as soon as it went on sale.  If there are manufacturing issues why not tell people up front that quantities will be limited or delay the launch of that model until sufficient quantities are availalbe. I'm glad they released a statement though. Hopefully they'll get fewer disappointed walk in customers.
  • Reply 23 of 140
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 



    How do you know they didn't? Apple ordered the manufacturers to produce 70 millions iPhones for this year, it means at least 50% or 35 millions of them already sold out. No any human nor a machine can produce a perfectly made iPhone from hundred of parts from multiple different sources across multiple countries plus assembly and QA tests multiply by 70 millions times within a couple of months. Well, unless you want to hear more suicides happening in the factories, please stop already with the "why don't they just make more". The only problem Apple has is that iPhone success is getting too big.
    edited September 2016 nolamacguymuadiberation alcaliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 140
    tailstoo said:
    Apple did not make so many because they were thinking that the 7 wouldn't sell so well. Then they moved up the launch by a week (usually there is more time between the announcement and the launch, so there was less stock, then they had to something for the IPhone Upgrade program people, so there went the store stock. 

    Until we we see real numbers, I'm not going to assume that 7 is a big winner yet. All those people buying Apple stock on margin might be sorry. 
    And there's the troll. Took long enough to respond.

    Every year this happens and every year it's the same bullshit. Every year Apple blows away expectations. 

    Please. Just. Stop.
    williamlondonjcdinkinswaverboyjustin freitasnolamacguytmayai46ration alapplepieguycali
  • Reply 25 of 140
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    Trolls don't understand things like global business models and how inventory costs money. The fact is you have demand in the millions and it's not possible the completely satisfy that demand all at once.
    williamlondontgr1nolamacguyjbishop1039caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 140
    Some people gonna hate regardless of what Apple does. Too funny. Meanwhile, I'll keep sipping mimosas and listening to the waves crash on the shore as a long term Apple investor. Cheers.
    williamlondonradarthekatImRungryai46caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 140
    I ordered mine at att site on pre- order day @ 00015 expected delivery date is oct 14-24. 7+ jblk.....it's probably still being made when I ordered
    cali
  • Reply 28 of 140
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,618member
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    You think the stock would just sit there? Really? It's darn obvious that if Apple had a few million more available they wouldn't be sitting around gathering dust. Your post doesn't make much sense since it's based on the flawed premise they'd have to be stuffed in a warehouse until someone wanted them.

    To be honest I don't really understand why every iPhone launch, every single one, starts out with "constrained supply" unless that's the way Apple prefers it. 9 years in now if Apple wanted plenty of iPhones available for launch day, and considering Tim Cook's reputation as a master of the supply chain, they would have them. They can't reasonably be surprised by the demand after all these years. So the simplest explanation, which more often than not is the correct one, is that it all happens because that's the way Apple wants it. They would appear to be totally unconcerned, perhaps even pleased, if initial product stock can't meet demand, and why not? They're not going to lose any sale if someone has to wait an extra week or two to get an iPhone, and on the plus side it builds anticipation, evidence for a great product that everyone must want, and a sense of rarity "so get it now" leading to perhaps more demand for a few more of 'em. It works so there's zero reason to change anything.  Next year they same thing will play out just as it has for the past nine.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 29 of 140
    No worry. Apple will add capacity to fulfill demand before the holiday season. Apple got caught in media jibber-jabber that iPhone 7 will be boring, people not going to rush out buy/upgrade. So Apple played safe with early production.
    cali
  • Reply 30 of 140
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 


    It's very difficult to accurately forecast way in advance 1) the number of actual orders that will occur and 2) actual inventory approaching launch given the huge numbers Apple sells. Gets harder the more choice of models that need to be supplied. Don't forget every single component used in the phone has to be available too. Having said that, it is a little surprising that all the Plus models are already gone. Could give support to the rumor that the dual cameras were in short supply.  
    williamlondontmay
  • Reply 31 of 140
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,057moderator
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 


    It's quite simple, if you just think about it.

    1. Starting production earlier means that you must complete all manufacturing testing and optimization earlier, you must install any specialized equipment earlier, you must bring on additional required staff earlier.  Everything prior to production ramping is also moved to earlier dates.  It's not like Apple has everything ready and is sitting with huge bins of parts and idle factories, purposefully delaying the start of production.  The whole supply chain needs time to ramp prior to ramping production; if even one component isn't ready, then not one phone can be assembled.  So it's a huge coordination task, and volume production begins when it begins.  Nobody is purposefully holding back supply.

    2. Scaling production, once begun, could alleviate much of the initial supply constrants.  Apple, along with its production partners, could build twice the number of assembly lines, order from suppliers twice the component flow, requiring partners to scale up their own production capabilities.  But you don't scale production to meet an initial surge in demand.  That would be a foolish waste of energy and resources.  You scale production closer to what you think steady state demand will be, so that you and your many suppliers aren't scrambling for workers, training them, building out more production lines, which require more floor space, only to soon after idle those production lines, layoff those extra workers you just took pains to find, hire, and train, and shut the lights in now empty facilities.  That would be insane.  When you have a popular product like the iPhone, you suffer some initial supply constraint in order to optimize these other things. 

    Don't worry, I'm copying my comment so I'll be able to paste it here again next year.
    edited September 2016 williamlondone1618978quinneynolamacguySolijbishop1039focherai46tmayration al
  • Reply 32 of 140
    gatorguy said:
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    You think the stock would just sit there? Really? It's darn obvious that if Apple had a few million more available they wouldn't be sitting around gathering dust. Your post doesn't make much sense since it's based on the flawed premise they'd have to be stuffed in a warehouse until someone wanted them.

    To be honest I don't really understand why every iPhone launch, every single one, starts out with "constrained supply" unless that's the way Apple prefers it. 9 years in now if Apple wanted plenty of iPhones available for launch day, and considering Tim Cook's reputation as a master of the supply chain, they would have them. They can't reasonably be surprised by the demand after all these years. So the simplest explanation, which more often than not is the correct one, is that it all happens because that's the way Apple wants it. They would appear to be totally unconcerned, perhaps even pleased, if initial product stock can't meet demand, and why not? They're not going to lose any sale if someone has to wait an extra week or two to get an iPhone, and on the plus side it builds anticipation, evidence for a great product that everyone must want, and a sense of rarity "so get it now" leading to perhaps more demand for a few more of 'em. It works so there's zero reason to change anything.  Next year they same thing will play out just as it has for the past nine.
    Another, "I know better than they do," expert on supply chain management. YES, the fucking stock would sit there. Do you know how many months in advance they start to build these things? Do you realise how many components go into the making of these phones, and those of course would need to be fabricated FIRST, such as the chips. You demonstrate zero knowledge of business in your "they aren't going to lose any sale" and utter ignorance of corporate risk and management/business decisions, it's laughable. But, any opportunity to slam Apple from the armchair critics association of people who have never held positions such as those.
    nolamacguyai46tmayration al
  • Reply 33 of 140
    Monday will mark the day the first class action lawsuit will be filed on behalf of owners of the new jet black iPhone due to light scratches and like abrasions. You heard it hear first.
  • Reply 34 of 140
    November 16th Delivery for me. Ordered the 7+ Jet Black via Verizon online @ 6am on Pre-order day.
  • Reply 35 of 140
    Jet Black 256 is Mid October for me.
  • Reply 36 of 140
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,618member
    gatorguy said:
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    You think the stock would just sit there? Really? It's darn obvious that if Apple had a few million more available they wouldn't be sitting around gathering dust. Your post doesn't make much sense since it's based on the flawed premise they'd have to be stuffed in a warehouse until someone wanted them.

    To be honest I don't really understand why every iPhone launch, every single one, starts out with "constrained supply" unless that's the way Apple prefers it. 9 years in now if Apple wanted plenty of iPhones available for launch day, and considering Tim Cook's reputation as a master of the supply chain, they would have them. They can't reasonably be surprised by the demand after all these years. So the simplest explanation, which more often than not is the correct one, is that it all happens because that's the way Apple wants it. They would appear to be totally unconcerned, perhaps even pleased, if initial product stock can't meet demand, and why not? They're not going to lose any sale if someone has to wait an extra week or two to get an iPhone, and on the plus side it builds anticipation, evidence for a great product that everyone must want, and a sense of rarity "so get it now" leading to perhaps more demand for a few more of 'em. It works so there's zero reason to change anything.  Next year they same thing will play out just as it has for the past nine.
    Another, "I know better than they do," expert on supply chain management. YES, the fucking stock would sit there. Do you know how many months in advance they start to build these things? Do you realise how many components go into the making of these phones, and those of course would need to be fabricated FIRST, such as the chips. You demonstrate zero knowledge of business in your "they aren't going to lose any sale" and utter ignorance of corporate risk and management/business decisions, it's laughable. But, any opportunity to slam Apple from the armchair critics association of people who have never held positions such as those.
    Who the hell is slamming Apple?? Certainly not me. As I pretty plainly said this is the way Apple wants it to be IMHO. If they wanted a few million more available to sell at each year's launch they very obviously could since they already know the initial demand is ALWAYS high and everything they have will sell in very short order.
    So no I "don't know better than they do" since I agree with the way they're doing it now. It works. I just think I know better than you do. :)
    edited September 2016 singularity
  • Reply 37 of 140
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 


    I've entertained the idea of a marketing stunt, but logically, that makes no sense.  First Apple doesn't want to turn away any sale at any time, even for marketing purposes.   But the most important reason is that Apple, or any manufacturer for that matter, can only make but so many phones per day.  If I'm not mistaken, they only ramp up production in July.   It's not as though they can start manufacturing a year in advance.  
    williamlondonai46
  • Reply 38 of 140

    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    You said it so much better than I.  Thanks!   
    williamlondonai46
  • Reply 39 of 140
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,604member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    birko said:
    muadibe said:
    Sold out globally. Impressive. 
    Is it impressive or a marketing stunt. They sell out year after year. Why don't they just make millions more before launch - what doesn't sell will sell pre-christmas. 
    Okay, how many? How many more million? Store them where? How much more time devoted to production and security of storage, should they start building iPhone 8s right now so they have enough for next year's model? How much money do you expect to pay for this, because the cost has to be embedded in the phone for storage, extra security to protect these filled warehouses which store *unsold* product worth potentially billions of dollars. What is the exact formula, other than simply, "more." The costs, the supply chain constraints, the security, the money spent in the stock that just sits there, the lead time to manufacture millions of phones, perhaps the problem is all the impatient people who day one "MUST HAVE TODAY!" attitudes that should be managed, eh?!
    You think the stock would just sit there? Really? It's darn obvious that if Apple had a few million more available they wouldn't be sitting around gathering dust. Your post doesn't make much sense since it's based on the flawed premise they'd have to be stuffed in a warehouse until someone wanted them.

    To be honest I don't really understand why every iPhone launch, every single one, starts out with "constrained supply" unless that's the way Apple prefers it. 9 years in now if Apple wanted plenty of iPhones available for launch day, and considering Tim Cook's reputation as a master of the supply chain, they would have them. They can't reasonably be surprised by the demand after all these years. So the simplest explanation, which more often than not is the correct one, is that it all happens because that's the way Apple wants it. They would appear to be totally unconcerned, perhaps even pleased, if initial product stock can't meet demand, and why not? They're not going to lose any sale if someone has to wait an extra week or two to get an iPhone, and on the plus side it builds anticipation, evidence for a great product that everyone must want, and a sense of rarity "so get it now" leading to perhaps more demand for a few more of 'em. It works so there's zero reason to change anything.  Next year they same thing will play out just as it has for the past nine.
    Another, "I know better than they do," expert on supply chain management. YES, the fucking stock would sit there. Do you know how many months in advance they start to build these things? Do you realise how many components go into the making of these phones, and those of course would need to be fabricated FIRST, such as the chips. You demonstrate zero knowledge of business in your "they aren't going to lose any sale" and utter ignorance of corporate risk and management/business decisions, it's laughable. But, any opportunity to slam Apple from the armchair critics association of people who have never held positions such as those.
    Who the hell is slamming Apple?? Certainly not me. As I pretty plainly said this is the way Apple wants it to be IMHO. If they wanted a few million more available to sell at each year's launch they very obviously could since they already know the initial demand is ALWAYS high and everything they have will sell in very short order.
    So no I "don't know better than they do" since I agree with the way they're doing it now. It works. I just think I know better than you do.

    Yes and no.

    Every year is a whole new ball game. They no they will sell a sh*tload, but what many don't seem to grasp here is that a sh*tload isn't actually a real number.  If they went to their suppliers and said, 'iPhone 7 is on its way; we're going to need a sh*tload of memory modules' then their suppliers would probably ask them if they could be more specific. Until the phones have been on sale for a few weeks then Apple has no idea which colour will sell better (compounded by the fact that there are now two versions of black), which memory configuration will prove most popular and what size folk are going to go for, and all this can apply differently for every region they sell in. Once they have the figures in then the supply chain will be adjusted accordingly and things improve. This happens every year so you can understand why I get a little tired with the concern-trolling and conspiracy theories it seems to invoke.

    You'd have to be a desperate sort of outfit to think that there is any advantage to denying your products to customers, and Apple isn't exactly desperate.

    The world's best supply chain folk work for Apple, and they are working no differently to anyone else. I have worked in large scale manufacturing operations and I tell can you that the best ones are run so tightly that they penalise suppliers who deliver early.

    And then there is prudence. Apple doesn't flood the market, even if they can sell everyone, because they're a cautious bunch. Remember AntennaeGate? BendGate? Storms in teacups, sure … but what if there was a problem? What if they had to recall? This is why the models featuring new manufacturing, design and state-of-the-art components are always in short supply. Apple would rather risk the ire of the impatient because the chances are that once they've decided on an iPhone then they're not going to change to an Android phone just because the phone they really want is in short supply, especially now since changing to an Android phone could result in serious burns or damage to property.

    No company in its right mind would saturate the market with a brand new high tech product, without testing the waters first. This is not to say that Samsung is not in its right mind of course. They thought they were delivering a pretty standard unit assembled from pretty standard components; it is unlikely they could have seen this coming.

    edited September 2016 kevin keewilliamlondontgr1nolamacguyai46
  • Reply 40 of 140
    Now the anal-ysts will be saying that because the 7-7+ is so successful the iphone 8 will fail. And on it goes.
    SpamSandwichjustin freitasfocherwatto_cobra
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