iPhone 7 owners say phones producing 'hissing' sound under heavy task loads

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 99
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,854member
    It's chip noise. Whether it's caused by the physical design of the components and boards or caused by an iOS 10 feature that is stressing the system remains to be seen.
  • Reply 82 of 99
    welshdog said:
    It's chip noise.
    Chips can MAKE noise? Is that why I’m able to hear my 802.11n AirPort hissing?
  • Reply 83 of 99
    fafot said:
    B Actually it has nothing to do with iPhone 7.
    It is iOS 10. Today I was importing photos to Google Photos on iPad Pro 9.7" with iOS 10 and the hiss appeared!!! B


    Right... Good grief, did you read the previous post. You probably just didn't notice it before.
  • Reply 84 of 99
    welshdog said:
    It's chip noise. Whether it's caused by the physical design of the components and boards or caused by an iOS 10 feature that is stressing the system remains to be seen.
    How would IOS 10 "stress" the system, especially because someone claimed it happened on 9.7.
    Such a claim should be pretty easy to prove, go back to 9.3.5 and test the sound with a decibel meter and something that registers frequency and do the exact same actions for both versions.
  • Reply 85 of 99
    Updated to iOS 10 on release for 6+. I haven't heard this hissing yet. I don't expect to, or when I upgrade to 7+ before years end. 
  • Reply 86 of 99
    I guess the initial setup / restore puts the phone under load as it has a lot of indexing to do (photos)... but once that settles and under normal use this won't be a problem
  • Reply 87 of 99
    "I'm guessing, heat under high load heats air quick, air takes more volume, escapes through a tiny hole (see balloon)."

    Remember Steve Jobs used to toss iPods in the water and said if there were any bubbles, the iPod could get smaller? Look at how much smaller the phones are (and how much more is packed in there). There is no volume of air that can do that.

    If it is actually there, it is electronic hum as others have guessed.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 88 of 99
    r00fus1 said:
    I have an iPhone7+ 256GB on order, and I'm especially sensitive to noise (and tend to use my phone at night, etc). If this is as annoying as they say, I'm definitely returning mine. I have a really nice iPhone6 that doesn't hiss, I'll keep that if need be.
    Don't have my Plus yet. Wife'a 256GB 7 is dead silent though under full load. Isolated issue. I work with Pro audio, this sounds a lot like a ground loop interference issue commonly seen with cheap apc laptops, but it obviously caused by something else. 
  • Reply 89 of 99
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,509member
    Apple is also looking into why some iPhone 7's don't properly handle Airplane Mode, failing to reinitialize mobile services afterwards. The good news is Apple has apparently instructed Genius Bars to replace those units without going thru additional testing, an acknowledgement of a problem affecting at least some early units. 
    https://youtu.be/-lmK33hZ-hA
  • Reply 90 of 99
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,639member
    Tell these iPhone 7 users to first get their hearing checked.
    If you can hear something, you don't need your hearing checked.  It's when you CAN'T hear something that one needs their hearing checked. 


    hungover
  • Reply 91 of 99
    dysamoria said:
    My MacBook Pro 5,5 whines too. The noises change in response to CPU and GPU usage. When sleeping, the power supply whines as the sleep LED goes dark and quiets a bit as it lights up.
    I had a phone charger that used to make an annoyingly l"oud "noise as it neared the end of its life It almost sounded like an old skool modem
  • Reply 92 of 99
    misa said:
    artharg said:
    Ouch. Seems like no one here has been around long enough to recognize this. It's the clock of the processor you're hearing through some sort of electromagnetic coupling to the enclosure. In this case it must a beat frequency that is within the audible range. I remember being able to tell by ear which part of a program a CPU was in. Different loops made different noises.
    This kind of thing happens with my computer monitor. When the screen is mostly white, I can hear some kind of high pitch noise, but it isn't present when it's mostly dark. Like I replaced the sound card and still hear it, so I know it's not coming from the desktop.

    Also to note, I actually hear high pitch noises that my parents can't hear.


    My stepson used to whine about his tv whining. I couldn't hear it so i didn't care, and yes I believe that he could hear it.

    To wind him up I downloaded https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:17.4_kHz_sound.ogg and had great fun playing it and then denying having done anything when his mum asked what he was complaining about.


  • Reply 93 of 99
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    hungover said:
    misa said:
    artharg said:
    Ouch. Seems like no one here has been around long enough to recognize this. It's the clock of the processor you're hearing through some sort of electromagnetic coupling to the enclosure. In this case it must a beat frequency that is within the audible range. I remember being able to tell by ear which part of a program a CPU was in. Different loops made different noises.
    This kind of thing happens with my computer monitor. When the screen is mostly white, I can hear some kind of high pitch noise, but it isn't present when it's mostly dark. Like I replaced the sound card and still hear it, so I know it's not coming from the desktop.

    Also to note, I actually hear high pitch noises that my parents can't hear.


    My stepson used to whine about his tv whining. I couldn't hear it so i didn't care, and yes I believe that he could hear it.

    To wind him up I downloaded https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:17.4_kHz_sound.ogg and had great fun playing it and then denying having done anything when his mum asked what he was complaining about.
    hungover
  • Reply 94 of 99
    Soli said:
    hungover said:
    misa said:
    artharg said:
    Ouch. Seems like no one here has been around long enough to recognize this. It's the clock of the processor you're hearing through some sort of electromagnetic coupling to the enclosure. In this case it must a beat frequency that is within the audible range. I remember being able to tell by ear which part of a program a CPU was in. Different loops made different noises.
    This kind of thing happens with my computer monitor. When the screen is mostly white, I can hear some kind of high pitch noise, but it isn't present when it's mostly dark. Like I replaced the sound card and still hear it, so I know it's not coming from the desktop.

    Also to note, I actually hear high pitch noises that my parents can't hear.


    My stepson used to whine about his tv whining. I couldn't hear it so i didn't care, and yes I believe that he could hear it.

    To wind him up I downloaded https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:17.4_kHz_sound.ogg and had great fun playing it and then denying having done anything when his mum asked what he was complaining about.
    Yeah,,well it is less obvious than waterboarding.

    BTW I do love him to bits (most of the time).

    :-)

    Ps thanks for the link,I wasn't familiar with the term.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 95 of 99
    misa said:
    artharg said:
    Ouch. Seems like no one here has been around long enough to recognize this. It's the clock of the processor you're hearing through some sort of electromagnetic coupling to the enclosure. In this case it must a beat frequency that is within the audible range. I remember being able to tell by ear which part of a program a CPU was in. Different loops made different noises.
    This kind of thing happens with my computer monitor. When the screen is mostly white, I can hear some kind of high pitch noise, but it isn't present when it's mostly dark. Like I replaced the sound card and still hear it, so I know it's not coming from the desktop.

    Also to note, I actually hear high pitch noises that my parents can't hear.


    some TVs do this as well -- whiter screens with a high pitched whine. my plasma does, read users discussing it on a forum. 
    I have experienced that with older screens, my understanding was that one of the many capacitors was vibrating? That said it is not supposed to be audible under normal usage, 
  • Reply 96 of 99
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,854member
    foggyhill said:
    welshdog said:
    It's chip noise. Whether it's caused by the physical design of the components and boards or caused by an iOS 10 feature that is stressing the system remains to be seen.
    How would IOS 10 "stress" the system, especially because someone claimed it happened on 9.7.
    Such a claim should be pretty easy to prove, go back to 9.3.5 and test the sound with a decibel meter and something that registers frequency and do the exact same actions for both versions.
    Others claimed it started after upgrade to 10. The OS could easily have code that causes hardware to work harder than planned or tested for.  The code could be "bad" or just a series of unfortunate events.

  • Reply 97 of 99
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,854member
    welshdog said:
    It's chip noise.
    Chips can MAKE noise? Is that why I’m able to hear my 802.11n AirPort hissing?
    Yes chips can make noise.
  • Reply 98 of 99
    I received my iPhone 7 Plus on Tuesday. I restored from my iCloud backup. Of course, the phone was so warm at the end. I heard a buzzing sound coming from top-back part of it, and it was really loud (not expecting from an iPhone). After an hour later, I hardly heard any sound. But as soon as I woke up the phone(screen on) sounds was coming back. A sound like you are trying to find an FM station manually. It is very annoying. I called Apple and they are replacing it. I hope the new one won't have that sound issue.

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