Nikon takes aim at GoPro with new KeyMission line of iPhone-connected action cameras

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2016
Nikon announced its first three action cameras on Monday ahead of this week's Photokina expo in Germany, looking to claim share of a field largely dominated by GoPro.




The top of Nikon's line is the KeyMission 360, equipped with two 20-megapixel sensors to capture 360-degree footage at 4K resolution. Each lens has an f/2.0 maximum aperture, and the camera notably stitches together video on-device, instead of offloading the task to a separate product like an iPhone or laptop.

Reflecting its purpose, the 360 is waterproof to 98 feet, and shockproof at heights up to 6.6 feet. It's also cold-resistant, capable of working in temperatures as low as 14 degrees Fahrenheit.




The KeyMission 170 is closer to a standard GoPro, taking its name from a 170-degree field of view. It's scaled down from the 360 in other respects, for instance using an 8.3-megapixel sensor, although it can still record video in 4K. Its aperture tops out at f/2.8, and it's only waterproof to 33 feet by default, though people will be able to buy waterproof housing rated for depths up to 131 feet.




The KeyMission 80, with an 80-degree field of view, is targeted more at the general public, in fact marketed as something people might use in place of their regular smartphone camera. It has a rear-facing 12-megapixel camera with an f/2.0 lens, while a front-facing camera is scaled back to 5 megapixels and f/2.2. For control, there's a 1.75-inch touchscreen.

The 80 doesn't support 4K video, and can only shoot underwater at a depth of 1 meter (about 3 feet) for 30 minutes.

The 80, 170, and 360 can be preordered for $276.95, $396.95 and $496.95 respectively from B&H with free expedited shipping and no tax outside NY. B&H is also including a free KeyMission accessory pack valued at $149.95 with KeyMission 360 preorders (while supplies last). Nikon is accepting preorders as well, but at MSRP, and the free accessory pack comes with 170 and 360 preorders. All three devices are scheduled to ship in October.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    Smart move, Nikon! I guess Canon, Leica, and others will follow.
    mike1repressthis
  • Reply 2 of 10
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member

    Each lens has an f/2.0 maximum aperture, 
    That is not the way to describe the lens. There are two different things going on. Aperture refers to the shutter opening size and is described as f-stops. Larger capability is better but is automatically adjusted according the conditions. In this case the lens is an f/2.0 (lower is better). This refers to how fast the lens is. The lower the number the easier it is for light to pass through the glass and enter through the aperture. f/2.0 is a pretty fast lens which makes it ideal for underwater use where light is already diminished. That is why the less expensive cameras have a higher lens f/ rating. They are not as fast.
    edited September 2016 mike1roakerepressthis
  • Reply 3 of 10
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    "iPhone connected"

    Shows how much these stand alone cameras are dying. I wonder if they'll be around in 10 years? They'll probably be used by photographers as "vintage gear". I must admit, Canon is a company I've wanted Apple to acquire...maybe soon.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    volcan said:

    Each lens has an f/2.0 maximum aperture, 
    That is not the way to describe the lens. There are two different things going on. Aperture refers to the shutter opening size and is described as f-stops. Larger capability is better but is automatically adjusted according the conditions. In this case the lens is an f/2.0 (lower is better). This refers to how fast the lens is. The lower the number the easier it is for light to pass through the glass and enter through the aperture. f/2.0 is a pretty fast lens which makes it ideal for underwater use where light is already diminished. That is why the less expensive cameras have a higher lens f/ rating. They are not as fast.
    Without direct knowledge of how these cameras are made, I'd guess the lens system is basically the same as other lenses in this bracket, including smartphones; most of them have a maximum aperture that cannot be adjusted and the exposure is corrected exclusively through shutter speed and sensitivity settings. Their tiny size makes an adjustable aperture difficult to implement and fewer moving parts (the shutter is electronic) makes the cameras more durable and impact-resistant.
    repressthis
  • Reply 5 of 10
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    cali said:
    "iPhone connected"

    Shows how much these stand alone cameras are dying. I wonder if they'll be around in 10 years? They'll probably be used by photographers as "vintage gear". I must admit, Canon is a company I've wanted Apple to acquire...maybe soon.
    Canon does a lot of industry related stuff like digital x-ray, on demand printing, surveillance systems, etc. Apple doesn't usually buy multi-industry companies, just like it made no sense to by Nuance just to get Siri. Anyway, I have no idea why Apple would want to buy a camera company. They already have the most popular camera in the world, at least according to social media sites.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 10
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    pdbreske said:
    Without direct knowledge of how these cameras are made, I'd guess the lens system is basically the same as other lenses in this bracket, including smartphones; most of them have a maximum aperture that cannot be adjusted and the exposure is corrected exclusively through shutter speed and sensitivity settings. Their tiny size makes an adjustable aperture difficult to implement and fewer moving parts (the shutter is electronic) makes the cameras more durable and impact-resistant.
    Agreed, I was just defining a classic camera shutter aperture as a matter of differentiation between an aperture and a lens.
    repressthis
  • Reply 7 of 10
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    cali said:
    "iPhone connected"
    I shoots 23 MP images. I don't know if you have ever used Nikon SnapBridge, but it is terrible and slow. You could remove the SD card and download a day's worth of images to your computer the old fashion way before you could save one 23 MP image over BT. But I suppose it can automatically down sample for quick upload to social media.
    edited September 2016 repressthis
  • Reply 8 of 10
    Pointless. Now even in motorsports there is iPhone app that kills even GoPro with iPhone or Android camera and it has full telemetry for amateur racing. Check the posts on YouTube from SCCA Solo competition. Why the hell to try and target GoPro while it is already in deep...? It is not about HD or 4K and number of frames anymore or even waterproof. It is about functional use in particular discipline. GoPro was winning because of quality at price and solid durability, but now game has shifted. Plus if one wants pro then there is completely another shelf that either is based on GoPro or kills it with something better. This news would have been good four years ago.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 9 of 10
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,878member
    cincymac said:
    Smart move, Nikon! I guess Canon, Leica, and others will follow.
    I hope they do a good job in their early foray into this field,  I was a Nikon shooter throughout the era of film.  It was the awful, digital cameras from Nikon in the early days that turned me to Canon and I have never gone back.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 10 of 10
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,495member
    Pointless. Now even in motorsports there is iPhone app that kills even GoPro with iPhone or Android camera and it has full telemetry for amateur racing. Check the posts on YouTube from SCCA Solo competition. Why the hell to try and target GoPro while it is already in deep...? It is not about HD or 4K and number of frames anymore or even waterproof. It is about functional use in particular discipline. GoPro was winning because of quality at price and solid durability, but now game has shifted. Plus if one wants pro then there is completely another shelf that either is based on GoPro or kills it with something better. This news would have been good four years ago.
    It isn't clear what you're talking about here. The iPhone app is used with what camera? And exactly which of the many SCCA Solo videos are you referring to, captured with what setups? Serious questions.
    edited September 2016
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