Samsung, carriers pushing update with safety alert to un-exchanged Galaxy Note 7 phones

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in General Discussion
Amidst reports of replacement stock finally arriving at retail, Samsung is taking additional steps to ensure that Galaxy Note 7 owners turn in devices for exchange, and is in the process of pushing an update to all un-repaired devices urging owners to power down the device and comply with the recall.




On late Tuesday, Samsung confirmed that it was working with U.S wireless carriers on a software update for the beleaguered Galaxy Note 7 for users to be able to easily confirm that the device had been repaired, or had yet to be exchanged.

With update VRS2APHE, users with an older, un-repaired model will see a warning about the recall program, with information on how to turn in the phone. A device showing a green battery icon indicates a new model with the new battery.

At the same time, Samsung confirmed that it had shipped 500,000 replacements for the Galaxy Note 7 to U.S. wireless carriers for consumer replacement. AppleInsider has learned that some of the retail arms of AT&T and Verizon have received "a handful" of devices for consumer swap.

A Samsung spokeswoman notes that the "vast majority" of Galaxy Note 7 consumers have opted for a refund, or a different Galaxy-branded phone.

Samsung issued a voluntary recall worldwide for the device after wide-spread reports of battery fires during charging, and drew criticism from the U.S. Consumer Protection and Safety Commission for how the matter was being handled. All customers who have purchased a Galaxy Note 7 should now be able to swap the device for a new one either online or at wireless carrier corporate-owned stores.

Before the well-publicized battery fires in the Galaxy Note 7 forcing the recall, reviewers and YouTube examiners discovered that the Gorilla Glass 5 used for the screen of the device was significantly more susceptible to screen scratches than other smartphones, iPhone 7 family included.

Verizon has re-launched sales of the device in the U.S., but no consumer delivery date has been announced.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    Notice how no where in the media, or in any PR release, does Samsung specify if the "replacement" units have had the charging circuit design deficiency (which was also thought as suspect in the exploding phones), re-designed and corrected, or where / who they sourced the replacement batteries from... For all we know, consumers can be getting "replacements" with the same catastrophic design flaw that lead to this in the first place...

    And how on EARTH can people be foolish enough to trust a brand that was caught lying about this from the start? From how many phones were affected, to claiming none of the units shipped to China had issues (which they later had to recall too), to putting out a stupid update to limit the charging to 60%? That's basically similar to what VW was doing with their diesel engines!

    I've bumped into people who have bluntly told me Samsung has done everything right and are still awesome and that they'll be getting another Note 7... At first I felt bad for people who got burnt (literally), but now I just feel like laughing at their stupidity...
    nolamacguypalominewatto_cobrapscooter63bigjony0
  • Reply 2 of 30
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    The funny thing is airlines won't be able to tell the difference.
    macxpresspalomineanantksundaramwatto_cobrachia
  • Reply 3 of 30
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,730member
    cali said:
    The funny thing is airlines won't be able to tell the difference.
    There will be a change in the battery charge indicator icon on screen; the new versions will be green. 

    Wanna bet that somebody creates a hack to do that on the recalled versions? Back to banning on planes if that happens.
    anantksundaramwatto_cobrachiapalomine
  • Reply 4 of 30
    In Australia there was a recall for spontaneously combusting washing machines, is it a Samsung feature?
    calipalominewatto_cobrabig
  • Reply 5 of 30
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    A Samsung spokeswoman notes that the "vast majority" of Galaxy Note 7 consumers have opted for a refund, or a different Galaxy-branded phone.

    There's a third choice?

  • Reply 6 of 30
    Rayz2016 said:
    A Samsung spokeswoman notes that the "vast majority" of Galaxy Note 7 consumers have opted for a refund, or a different Galaxy-branded phone.

    There's a third choice?

    Well, you can probably infer that those people requesting a refund may have bought a different branded phone.  May not have been an Apple.  Could easily have been an HTC or Moto if they are in love with Android.
    big
  • Reply 7 of 30
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    tmay said:
    cali said:
    The funny thing is airlines won't be able to tell the difference.
    There will be a change in the battery charge indicator icon on screen; the new versions will be green. 

    Wanna bet that somebody creates a hack to do that on the recalled versions? Back to banning on planes if that happens.

    I bet they still won't know the difference and continue to have them all banned. The confusion from airline employees and Galaxy users isn't worth the risk.

    Plus I've heard most people aren't returning them. Sammy says "vast majority" but they're the biggest liars in the industry.
    edited September 2016 palominemagman1979watto_cobrabig
  • Reply 8 of 30
    Do like Apple and force-download an album (song) onto users' devices.

    I nominate The Cult's "Fire Woman."
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 9 of 30
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member

    Samsung, carriers pushing update with safety alert ... "Buy Apple in Future"

    magman1979watto_cobrakpombigidreyjony0
  • Reply 10 of 30
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    RogerT said:
    In Australia there was a recall for spontaneously combusting washing machines, is it a Samsung feature?
    Worldwide there was no recall on spontaneously combusting Whirlpool Dishwashers. It's not a unique to any one brand. I do have a Bad Quality Samsung story however, my parents had one of these combusting whilepool dishwashers, AND a Samsung range hood+microwave, in which the microwave's panel "5E'd" 

    This is one of those issue where something was designed improperly and the defect only shows up after significant use. So my parents are on their third dishwasher and third microwave in less than 5 years. The lesson people need to learn is that cheaper items are NEVER better. You may luck out and get a cheap item that is built as well as a more expensive item with a longer warranty, but that never makes the cheaper item superior. 

    Apple's products are well designed (for the most part) that they rarely need to be repaired, and if recalls do happen, they happen, not waiting for a class action lawsuit to force a recall. Compare the Takata airbag recall to the Volkswagen emission fuel efficiency cheating. The former has resulted in 134 injuries and two deaths, while the latter has involved no deaths but would be substantially more expensive to recall all vehicles affected and severely damaging to the brand. 



    edited September 2016
  • Reply 11 of 30
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,922member
    Rayz2016 said:
    A Samsung spokeswoman notes that the "vast majority" of Galaxy Note 7 consumers have opted for a refund, or a different Galaxy-branded phone.

    There's a third choice?

    Heat shields. 
    kevin keepscooter63big
  • Reply 12 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,394member
    Notice how no where in the media, or in any PR release, does Samsung specify if the "replacement" units have had the charging circuit design deficiency (which was also thought as suspect in the exploding phones), re-designed and corrected, or where / who they sourced the replacement batteries from... For all we know, consumers can be getting "replacements" with the same catastrophic design flaw that lead to this in the first place.
    A media story yesterday regarding this said that Samsung was using a different battery supplier for the new replacements units, a Chinese manufacturer if I recall correctly. It would be a completely silly exercise with even worse ramifications for Sammy if they had not made a hardware change and instead sent out the same old flawed units in new boxes. Sounds pretty silly for you to even guess they'd knowingly subject themselves to another round of this.
    edited September 2016 singularity
  • Reply 13 of 30
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,077member
    I also think proof is in order that Samsung does destroy or modify these phones.  I suspect they will divert them to second and third world countries and resell them.  Samsung is a big presence in the developing world and I have no doubt they will do this.
    watto_cobrapalomine
  • Reply 14 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,394member
    badmonk said:
    I also think proof is in order that Samsung does destroy or modify these phones.  I suspect they will divert them to second and third world countries and resell them.  Samsung is a big presence in the developing world and I have no doubt they will do this.
    If they do it will be with different batteries. Zero chance Samsung will try to resell phones with known safety issues and the resultant liability if one catches fire. Ain't happenin' and I probably don't have much more respect for Samsung's business practices than others here. 
    anantksundaram
  • Reply 15 of 30
    gatorguy said:
    badmonk said:
    I also think proof is in order that Samsung does destroy or modify these phones.  I suspect they will divert them to second and third world countries and resell them.  Samsung is a big presence in the developing world and I have no doubt they will do this.
    If they do it will be with different batteries. Zero chance Samsung will try to resell phones with known safety issues and the resultant liability if one catches fire. Ain't happenin' and I probably don't have much more respect for Samsung's business practices than others here. 
    I am one of the biggest Sammie-bashers here, and I agree with you 100%.
    big
  • Reply 16 of 30

    I am amazed that the Carriers did not spend months testing and software update before they allowed it to be pushed out to android phone. The fact they reacted this quickly is amazing. Who said they Carriers can not respond quickly.

    You all realize why the Carriers did this, they had not choose, if users continue to use defective phones and one shows up on a plane they in trouble. You can bet there will be more BOGO or BOG3 deals coming offering Samsung product the Carriers are going to make Samsung pay dearly for this mistake.

  • Reply 17 of 30
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    Remember, this is the same company that committed fraud with their benchmarks.

    You gotta be a real special kind of stupid to trust or believe anything this company says.

    Would I want one of those phones in my house, even if it were given to me for free? Hell no. 
    watto_cobrapscooter63big
  • Reply 18 of 30

    Samsung, carriers pushing update with safety alert ... "Buy Apple in Future"

    Anybody can help me understand why Samsung needs to engage carriers to push update?

    I have been using iPhone since first generation, I can update ios myself once the update is available.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 30
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,223member
    ai2014 said:

    Samsung, carriers pushing update with safety alert ... "Buy Apple in Future"

    Anybody can help me understand why Samsung needs to engage carriers to push update?

    I have been using iPhone since first generation, I can update ios myself once the update is available.
    Because this is how the Android update mechanism has worked from day one: 

    Google writes update. 
    Manufacturer adapts update to all hardware they intend to support (stop laughing)
    Carrier approves updates published by hardware manufacturer (you're still laughing! - stop it!)
    Update is pushed to device. 

    That up there is why hardly any Android devices are ever updated, and if they ever are, almost none of them are updated for more than a year, and virtually none apart from Nexus are ever quite current.
    watto_cobrapscooter63big
  • Reply 20 of 30
    spheric said:
    ai2014 said:

    Samsung, carriers pushing update with safety alert ... "Buy Apple in Future"

    Anybody can help me understand why Samsung needs to engage carriers to push update?

    I have been using iPhone since first generation, I can update ios myself once the update is available.
    Because this is how the Android update mechanism has worked from day one: 

    Google writes update. 
    Manufacturer adapts update to all hardware they intend to support (stop laughing)
    Carrier approves updates published by hardware manufacturer (you're still laughing! - stop it!)
    Update is pushed to device. 

    That up there is why hardly any Android devices are ever updated, and if they ever are, almost none of them are updated for more than a year, and virtually none apart from Nexus are ever quite current.
    The real reason they're not updated... They barely make money off the initial sales, and they've already got your money... Sucker ;-).
    bigpalomine
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