First on iMac, iPad Pro & iPhone 7, Apple's vibrant wide color tech now comes to MacBook Pro

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
Apple's latest MacBook Pro features a revamped display that's brighter, has greater contrast, and marks the first Mac notebook to gain wide color support --?a particular boon for photographers -- all while consuming 30 percent less power.




Apple first introduced wide color support in its products with the all-in-one iMac desktop -- a logical place to start, given space constraints are less of a concern with a stationary machine.

Somewhat surprisingly, however, wide color next came to the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, and then in September made its way to the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus.

Mac notebook users waiting for more faithful color reproductions from photos were finally granted their wish this week, when Apple unveiled its next-generation MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. While the new dynamic display bar above the keyboard garnered most of the attention, the new Retina display on the latest MacBook Pro is a major upgrade in virtually every way.

Wide color support allows more lush and vibrant greens and vivid reds that traditional displays cannot reproduce. Specifically, Apple says the new P3 color MacBook Pro screen displays 25 percent more colors than the previous-generation sRGB screen.

By displaying truer-to-life pictures across the iPhone, iPad, desktop and now notebook Macs, Apple now allows photographers to see accurate reproductions of their work regardless of where or how they choose to get work done.




Beyond wide color, the latest MacBook Pro display is 67 percent brighter than before, measuring 500 nits brightness. And yet the display panel on the new professional-grade notebook is the same thinness as the 12-inch MacBook Retina display --?which does not support wide color.

In addition to brighter LED backlighting, the new MacBook Pro also has an improved contrast ratio that's 67 percent higher than before. This promises deeper shades of black and even brighter whites, which will even further benefit photographers running Apple's latest notebook.

The new late 2016 MacBook Pro is set to begin shipping in mid-November.

To grab the lowest prices on Apple's new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, see AppleInsider's Mac Price Guide.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
  • Reply 2 of 11
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,720member
    What I find interesting here is that so many are whining about this laptop release not realizing what a huge update it is.   Sure there are disappointments, that happens with every release of hardware, however there is the reality that the new MBP deliver a bundle of new technology.   This release is a big update to the MBP line and frankly has implemented some pretty neat technologies, the new LCD just being one of them.
    pscooter63Bluntmacplusplusdws-2jagnutwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    BluntBlunt Posts: 222member
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Greens you may be right. Oranges no way. P3 delivers some colours outside of the Adobe RGB space. Troll post?
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 11
    BUT
    the Apple Logo does Not Light Up
    on the back of the screen anymore


    :/  
  • Reply 5 of 11
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Blunt said:
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Greens you may be right. Oranges no way. P3 delivers some colours outside of the Adobe RGB space. Troll post?
    Please see this post and look at the photo of the orange BMW. P3 still leaves out some of the oranges, but as you mentioned it's far worse in the greens. I am not a troll, I am a former (happy) Apple employee and professional photographer, and I ordered one of the new MacBook Pros. I speak the truth about color management. It still comes down to doing it right on a calibrated monitor capable of AdobeRGB color, such as some of the NEC, Eizo, or Benq models. http://www.astramael.com
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 6 of 11
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Blunt said:
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Greens you may be right. Oranges no way. P3 delivers some colours outside of the Adobe RGB space. Troll post?
    Please see this post and look at the photo of the orange BMW. P3 still leaves out some of the oranges, but as you mentioned it's far worse in the greens. I am not a troll, I am a former (happy) Apple employee and professional photographer, and I ordered one of the new MacBook Pros. I speak the truth about color management. It still comes down to doing it right on a calibrated monitor capable of AdobeRGB color, such as some of the NEC, Eizo, or Benq models. http://www.astramael.com
    So, NEC, Eizo or Benq monitors can be calibrated to AdobeRGB profile, but the new Macbook Pro monitors can't be calibrated to AdobeRGB, is that your point?

    The article is about the monitor of the new Macbook Pro, not a general comparison of the monitors or color spaces. You are in the wrong article.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    The new MacBook Pro screen has a P3 color space. I simply pointed out that although that's good, it's not good enough for critical color correction for professional photography. I don't know of any laptop that offers the AdobeRGB color space. The headline of this article says the new screen is a boon to photographers and I am saying that it's better but not there yet. I am still buying one, however. I think my comment is exactly on topic for this article.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Blunt said:
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Greens you may be right. Oranges no way. P3 delivers some colours outside of the Adobe RGB space. Troll post?
    If you look at the color gamut profiles, you will see that P3 covers more orange than sRGB. In other words, P3 does deliver purer orange color. 
    Adobe RGB gamut is irrelevant in this case, because no one compares P3 to it.

    UPD: I have just checked - yes, P3 does deliver better orange than Adobe RGB. AdobeRGB covers greens nicely, but sucks at reds, so I am not sure, why did you say what you said...

    Aslo, there is no such thing as "right" color. But the closer you get to the edge of the locus/gamut plot, the clearer color becomes.
    And if some profile covers locus space, where another color profile can't, that means, that the former can reproduce those color without distorting them. 
    Now, look at AdobeRGB and P3 and say that AdobeRGB has better coverage of orange zone, comparing to P3...
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 9 of 11
    dacloodacloo Posts: 890member
    Check out the following in depth article on P3 and Adobe RGB. It shows the differences and similarities. It concludes both are great and, according to the author, doesn't really matter in the end: both offer wide gamut and do it well.

    http://www.astramael.com/
  • Reply 10 of 11
    K_CK_C Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Blunt said:
    bvhmac said:
    P3 is still not Adobe RGB and leaves out intense oranges and greens. The only proper way to edit photos is on an AdobeRGB compliant monitor, not a laptop screen.
    Greens you may be right. Oranges no way. P3 delivers some colours outside of the Adobe RGB space. Troll post?
    Please see this post and look at the photo of the orange BMW. P3 still leaves out some of the oranges, but as you mentioned it's far worse in the greens. I am not a troll, I am a former (happy) Apple employee and professional photographer, and I ordered one of the new MacBook Pros. I speak the truth about color management. It still comes down to doing it right on a calibrated monitor capable of AdobeRGB color, such as some of the NEC, Eizo, or Benq models. http://www.astramael.com
    So, NEC, Eizo or Benq monitors can be calibrated to AdobeRGB profile, but the new Macbook Pro monitors can't be calibrated to AdobeRGB, is that your point?

    The article is about the monitor of the new Macbook Pro, not a general comparison of the monitors or color spaces. You are in the wrong article.
    The huge leap of faith in the article is the statement, "Apple now allows photographers to see accurate reproductions of their work regardless of where or how they choose to get work done. " Which simply isn't true. Improved, yes. Accurate, not even close.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    I'm curious to know whether the new MBP displays can be hardware calibrated, like an Eizo, NEC or other high-end device.

    if so, it's possible that the hardware is capable of covering more of AdobeRGB when freed from the Apple-installed P3 display profile.
Sign In or Register to comment.