Flawed 3rd-party chargers reportedly culprit in Apple's China iPhone 6 investigation

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 24
    lkrupp said:
    Yep. We already knew this instinctively. Apple should modify their warranty to say use of an unapproved third party charger voids the warranty. Walk into any Walgreens and you’ll see a big pile of multi-colored, Chiclet style chargers and cables for $1.99 at the check out counter.
    No. What we already knew is that Apple would state that "You are charging it wrong". And that's what we got.
  • Reply 22 of 24
    nhtnht Posts: 4,456member

    Any medical professional is familiar with the truism that "Correlation does not prove causation".  It sounds like Apple needs to learn that phrase too...

    Apple has not proven causation here.  They merely stated that all the phones they looked at had damaged charging circuits.  They then assumed two things:

    1)  The phones were charged with non-standard chargers.
    2)  The non-standard chargers caused the damage.

    Those may or may not be correct assumptions.   Neither we nor Apple will know if they were correct until actually diagnoses the problem.

    Also:  Connecting an IPhone to a car radio with a lightening connector is using a non-standard charger.  How does Apple expect its users to use their phones (including Car Play) while driving without that?

    Come on Apple!   Time to do a bit better.  Users don't care about your excuses.   They only care about their phones working without any obvious misuse.

    Apple logs this so they can determine causation. If you jailbreak you can see a file called CurrentPowerlog.powerlog and a corresponding data archive.  

    Charging current is one of the logged items so a power spike from a 3rd party charger can be seen in the logs.

    This is is one of the things a genius can check with their tools and there may be additional logs related to just the charging circuit (as opposed to the battery log which this mostly is) that is logging spikes or when non compliant chargers are connected.

    It is then easy to then show that failures have occurred immediately after connecting to a non-apple charger (or a malfunctioning Apple charger).

    Car chargers don't have the possibility of shooting 110/240V line voltage into you or your phone because of poor isolation between the high and low power portions of the charger.

    Perhaps you should stick with commenting on medical issues as an expert and not believing that your expertise translates to technology issues...
    Rayz2016
  • Reply 23 of 24
    nht said:
    Car chargers don't have the possibility of shooting 110/240V line voltage into you or your phone because of poor isolation between the high and low power portions of the charger.
    Car chargers have an input voltage of about 12 V. Poor isolation implies that the input and output can connect. Can you rephrase/correct what you wrote?
  • Reply 24 of 24
    nhtnht Posts: 4,456member
    linkman said:
    nht said:
    Car chargers don't have the possibility of shooting 110/240V line voltage into you or your phone because of poor isolation between the high and low power portions of the charger.
    Car chargers have an input voltage of about 12 V. Poor isolation implies that the input and output can connect. Can you rephrase/correct what you wrote?
    UL requires a 4mm separation between the high and low power sections of the (wall) charger.  If you read any of the linked articles about the difference between Apple chargers and the cheap knock offs you'll see that many of the knockoffs don't provide sufficient isolation.  Low voltage traces on some chargers come within 0.6mm of a high voltage trace so a droplet of condensation (like in a bathroom) can bridge that gap and send line voltage into the device (or you if you are unlucky).

    Cars don't have the same issue.  Yes, a cheap $1 charger could send 14V down the line that could fry your charge control circuit but its likely able to handle it and shut off charging so the whole thing about how does apple expect us to do car play doesn't apply.  Car chargers are typically a few capacitors and a switching regulator.  A screw up there is likely to result in either lower power or no power.  The $5 car chargers provide a fuse and better workmanship but it still doesn't have to deal with a power source that can fry humans much less phones.
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