Apple Did It First

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Somone who is most knowlegable then I...or people. Lets make a list of all the things apple did first, or made mainstream. All the technologies and all the software ideas. I know there are many and i'm sure combined AI member can name a lot, i'm just curious on all the ones there are that i don't know. So if you would be so kind, please liste them for me. Thanks.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    The first PDA (The Newton).



    The first marketed GUI.



    The first marketed Mouse.



    The first all-in-one PC.



    The first killer app (Visi-Calc) spreadsheet app.



    [ 09-25-2002: Message edited by: MafiaMac ]</p>
  • Reply 2 of 33
    Apple sold the first computer that included a CD-ROM.



    Apple helped make SCSI mainstream.



    Apple marketed the first good consumer laser printer.



    Apple helped bring USB mainstream by completely dropping the legacy serial port (before then, I think only a few not-so-popular Compaq Presarios included a USB port).



    Apple made the "fruit colored plastic" insanely popular and mainstream. Stores like Target still sell iMac-like irons and coffeepots and other junk in translucent plastics.



    The concept of a menu bar was created by Apple (the PARC didn't have this).



    [ 09-26-2002: Message edited by: Brad ]</p>
  • Reply 3 of 33
    Apple were the first to disprove Moore's Law.
  • Reply 4 of 33
    QuickTime (desktop video)

    The QuickTake digital camera (not sure if it was the first but it definitely blazed the path)
  • Reply 5 of 33
    telomartelomar Posts: 1,804member
    Umm...how about just the first consumer computer. I can't believe nobody mentioned that one



    Then there is always firewire, invention has to count for something.



    First Unix-based consumer oriented system?



    [quote]Originally posted by Junkyard Dawg:

    <strong>Apple were the first to disprove Moore's Law.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Do you even know what Moore's law actually says?



    Apple have nothing to do with Moore's law and Motorola has followed it as much as any other company and certainly wasn't the first to break with what it says. Personally I'd argue it has never actually been proven as a law though given even Intel has failed to follow it. It's more of a very general observation than a law.



    [ 09-26-2002: Message edited by: Telomar ]</p>
  • Reply 6 of 33
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    [quote]Originally posted by Brad:

    <strong>Apple made the "fruit colored plastic" insanely popular and mainstream. Stores like Target still sell iMac-like irons and coffeepots and other junk in translucent plastics.



    The concept of a menu bar was created by Apple (the PARC didn't have this).</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Fruity translucent plastics were already popular in Asia...so Apple only carried the trend out of Asia, I guess.



    Apple is still pretty much the only OS that uses a global menu-bar.
  • Reply 7 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by Eugene:

    <strong>Apple is still pretty much the only OS that uses a global menu-bar.</strong><hr></blockquote>

    Ah, true, but I meant the menu bar in the more general sense, meaning the horizontal row of clickable texts that bring up verticle rows of more clickable texts. Sure, Windows, Linux, and the rest may have menus bars in each window, but Apple was the first with *any* kind of menu bar.







    Icons and windows, as we all know, were Xerox firsts.
  • Reply 8 of 33
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    [quote]Originally posted by Brad:

    <strong>

    Ah, true, but I meant the menu bar in the more general sense, meaning the horizontal row of clickable texts that bring up verticle rows of more clickable texts. Sure, Windows, Linux, and the rest may have menus bars in each window, but Apple was the first with *any* kind of menu bar.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Sure, but we all know which paradigm is the best (...makes the most sense.) I think it's amusing that pretty much no other interface designers are attempting to do the same...I wonder if Apple owns some kind of a patent for a global menu-bar implementation.
  • Reply 9 of 33
    stoostoo Posts: 1,490member
    First personal computer above 300MHz (the 6500 in Q2 1997).
  • Reply 10 of 33
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    just buy a been there done that t-shirt. good list right there
  • Reply 11 of 33
    here's a big one...

    Apple was the first to do a big production TV advertisement spot for the SuperBowl!



    Apple was the first to include and standardize the 3.5" floppy.



    Apple sold the first *complete* laptop with hard drive built-in, the original PowerBook 100.



    Apple started and standardized the use of trackpads with the PowerBook 500.



    Apple created the TrueType font format.



    Apple was the first with good speech synthesis. Remember how the Mac was introduced in '84? I believe the Mac said, "I sure am glad to be out of that bag."



    Apple's QuickTime is the first of the major media players (Real, MS) to have full, built-in MPEG-4 support.



    It's kinda off-topic, but I found this while cross-checking my history. Did you guys know that in '84 Apple bought 15% of Adobe for US$2.5 million? I wonder how much (if any) Apple still holds...



    [ 09-26-2002: Message edited by: Brad ]</p>
  • Reply 12 of 33
    stoostoo Posts: 1,490member
    Was that speech synthesis or a sound clip? I'd be muchly impressed if the original Mac did text to speech.
  • Reply 13 of 33
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    [quote]Originally posted by Eugene:

    <strong>



    Sure, but we all know which paradigm is the best (...makes the most sense.) I think it's amusing that pretty much no other interface designers are attempting to do the same...I wonder if Apple owns some kind of a patent for a global menu-bar implementation.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Well, NeXT wasn't allowed to use it - thus tear off menus.
  • Reply 14 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by Stoo:

    <strong>Was that speech synthesis or a sound clip?</strong><hr></blockquote>By the quality of the sound, I'd have to assume it was actual speech synthesis. It was similar to the "fred" voice we've had for so many years, but scratchier and a bit less dynamic with the tone. I used to have a sound file from the actual intro, but I can't seem to find it.
  • Reply 15 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by Brad:

    <strong>By the quality of the sound, I'd have to assume it was actual speech synthesis. It was similar to the "fred" voice we've had for so many years, but scratchier and a bit less dynamic with the tone. I used to have a sound file from the actual intro, but I can't seem to find it.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    I believe I have that on one of my hard drives. I'll have to look for it.
  • Reply 16 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by Telomar:

    <strong>

    Do you even know what Moore's law actually says?



    Apple have nothing to do with Moore's law and Motorola has followed it as much as any other company and certainly wasn't the first to break with what it says. Personally I'd argue it has never actually been proven as a law though given even Intel has failed to follow it. It's more of a very general observation than a law.



    [ 09-26-2002: Message edited by: Telomar ]</strong><hr></blockquote>



    It's a joke, dude. Do you even know what humor is?
  • Reply 17 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by Brad:

    <strong>

    Apple helped bring USB mainstream by completely dropping the legacy serial port (before then, I think only a few not-so-popular Compaq Presarios included a USB port).

    </strong><hr></blockquote>

    All the HP pavilions sold in 96 had USB, (I supported them) and I don't remember it being uncommon, there just weren't too many devices yet.



    Sony, fujitsu and a couple others had firewire first.



    Apple II was the first pre-assembled pc and first with color graphics.
  • Reply 18 of 33
    The first computer sold to use a hard molded plastic case, the Apple II.
  • Reply 19 of 33
    [quote]Originally posted by xmoger:

    <strong>Sony, fujitsu and a couple others had firewire first.</strong><hr></blockquote>Perhaps, but it's still worth noting that Apple was the one that conceived and developed IEEE 1394, FireWire, in 1995 even though it didn't integrate FW onto motherboards until 1999. Actually, I believe Apple still gets a few cents licensing fee for each FireWire device that is sold.
  • Reply 20 of 33
    I am not sure if this is correct but was the iMac the first computer to be cooled without a fan, maybe the G4 Cube? I am unsure but I think it was one those two.



    The G4 Cube was the first computer to be extractable from its case by a handle.



    The iBook was the first laptop to have a handle.
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