Scosche iPhone 7 Lightning line grows with noise isolating earbuds, Bose headphone adapter

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2016
Audio company Scosche has expanded its Lightning-equipped audio gear line, and has debuted its Noise Isolation Earbuds, as well as a Lighting to 2.5mm Remote to adapt Bose headphones to the iPhone 7 family.




The Noise Isolation Earbuds with Remote & Mic and Lightning connector features what the company calls "high-efficiency dynamic drivers," a built-in microphone to record voice memos and an in-line remote for the connected device. The earbuds also have a four-foot cable.

Each box includes small, medium, and large single-flanged silicone inserts for noise isolation and are available now in black or white for a retail price of $59.99.

The Scosche iPhone 7 Lightning to 2.5mm remote is an in-line replacement cable specifically for Bose headphones. The remote features a built-in microphone for hands-free calls and activating Siri.




Compatible with Bose's QC35, SoundTrue, QC25i and OE2 headphones, the iPhone 7 Lightning to 2.5mm remote for Bose Headphones is available now for $39.99.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,399member
    And this is how it will go down. Lightning cables will be available for older headphones with detachable cables. Except for all but the cheapest earbuds, I can't imagine any headphone maker continuing to manufacture fixed cable headphones, as the demand for Lightning, and USB-C, and wireless is only going to grow. Hopefully this will put an end to the ridiculous complaint that people won't be able to use their old headphones anymore with the iPhone 7 -- at least most of them anyway.
    edited December 2016
  • Reply 2 of 3
    the complaint was already ridiculous as apple included an adapter with the new iPhone and you could buy it separately as well if you wanted to use the lightning port on your old phone or iPad.

    actually, my bigger question is whether someone has an adapter that allows me to plug headphones that only have lightning in to a phone that only has 3.5 - i suspect the answer is no as you need power.  or an adapter that allows me to plug lighting headphones in to a usb port on my mac...
  • Reply 3 of 3
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,399member
    sgordon said:
    the complaint was already ridiculous as apple included an adapter with the new iPhone and you could buy it separately as well if you wanted to use the lightning port on your old phone or iPad.

    actually, my bigger question is whether someone has an adapter that allows me to plug headphones that only have lightning in to a phone that only has 3.5 - i suspect the answer is no as you need power.  or an adapter that allows me to plug lighting headphones in to a usb port on my mac...
    The answer is "no". There isn't even a hint of a Lightning headphone to anything else adapter. Not even USB-C, or Thunderbolt. That alone seems to be sufficient evidence that Apple has no intention of pushing Lightning as a replacement for 3.5mm, or anything else. The lack of support for the Mac is egregious in my opinion. It basically means anyone using an iPhone 7 will have to carry around 2 pair of EarPods if they want native compatibility with the iPhone 7 and a Mac, or use the 3.5mm adapter with the iPhone 7 and an old pair of earbuds, or use wireless headphones that will pair with the Mac. In light of Apple's poorly chosen comments about the headphone jack at the keynote, both of these solutions seem poorly thought out.

    Apple could have likely easily supported analogue audio input on the Lightning headphones, with an adapter that was powered enough by the headphone jack itself to send a signal to the Lightning headphones to tell them to bypass their internal DAC and route the analogue signal directly to the transducers. That would have been the most efficient way to do it. A simple powered adapter wouldn't be that big a deal either, though converting an analogue signal to digital, just to get it into the Lightning headphones, only to then convert it back into analogue would be silly.  Obviously USB-C and Thunderbolt would be the most practical adapter for moving forward, yet still nothing even rumored on the horizon. I have to wonder why. Of course as I pointed out, as long as headphones have detachable cables, there's no need for an adapter, though carrying around an analogue cable is a lot more cumbersome than a simple adapter.

    However, I don't fault people for complaining about the adapter. It does pose additional problems in terms of keeping track of it, durability and wear, and just plain kludgy on the end of an otherwise elegant headphone cable. But the hyperbolic complaint that their old headphones were rendered useless is just plain silly.
    edited December 2016
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