Quanta rumored to build 3rd-gen Apple Watch, with extended battery and better speed

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited January 2017
The next version of the Apple Watch due at the end of 2017 will bring little new to the table other than extended battery life and faster performance, if early supply chain reports out of China are to be believed.




According to the Chinese-langauge Economic Daily News, the next generation of the Apple Watch will be revealed in the third calendar quarter of 2017, and be built by Quanta Computer.

The new unit will reportedly not feature new sensors or a re-design, but will have extended battery life as compared to the current models, and a new version of the Apple S-series chip utilized in the Apple Watch, bringing better performance to the wearable.

Quanta has declined comment on "market speculation." Quanta is the current manufacturer of the Series 1 and Series 2 Apple Watch.

Few significant rumors surrounded the Apple Watch refresh, prior to release. It was said that Apple hoped to squeeze LTE wireless data support into the Series 2, but was unable to do so with current technology limitations.




The original Apple Watch was announced by CEO Tim Cook in Sept. 2014, with the device hitting the market in April 2015. Nearly immediately, the device became the best-selling wearable, and still dominates the smart watch category.

The Series 1 and Series 2 Apple Watches were revealed on Sept. 16, 2016. The Series 1 is essentially the same as its predecessor, but includes a faster dual-core S1P system on a chip.

The Series 2 Apple Watch is water resistant to 50 meters, has a brighter screen, includes the S2 chip, and GPS. As expected, it did not ship with LTE.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 39
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    trashman69albegarcGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 39
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,912member
    As always, incremental improvement is the name of the game. Compare the incremental iphone improvements from 2007 to 2016 and its dramatic over time. This is how apple rolls. How apple has always rolled. 

    http://www.macworld.com/article/1151235/macs/apple-rolls.html
    netmagedesignrai46
  • Reply 3 of 39
    Re: "Nearly immediately, the device became the best-selling wearable..."

    I love my Apple Watch, but the statement above is not true. Using the word "wearable" includes the many lower cost bands from Fitbit, etc., and they sell in higher volumes than Apple Watch. Where Apple Watch likely IS on top: (a) total revenue, (b) total profit, (c) units in the smartwatch category.
    albegarclarryaai46
  • Reply 4 of 39
    propodpropod Posts: 67member
    Better battery sounds good if it enables an always on mode of the watch face.
    albegarccalibrucemclarryabluefire1
  • Reply 5 of 39
    levilevi Posts: 344member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    Give me a break. Apple has no reason to hold back - they're moving as fast as the technology (and regulation) will allow them. Also even if we are to believe these are the only changes (which I'm skeptical of) I suspect that many current and prospective Apple Watch owners would be happy to buy a Watch with improved battery and processing performance. 
    wreighvennetmageStrangeDaysai46
  • Reply 6 of 39
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    Of course it will be incremental. You (and a lot of other people) need to stop expecting revolution when its always been an evolution.

    How much and where the incremental changes to the technology are what needs to be discussed, not bellyaching because over your semantical outrage. For instance, how much power can be reduced with a new SIP or new display, which will lead to more power for the same size battery, a smaller battery with the same usability time, or some balance in between. Are there other power hogs in the Watch? Could a smaller but similarly effective haptic motor help bring down the size and weight? ...
    edited January 2017 netmagedesignrGeorgeBMacmacxpressStrangeDaysai46
  • Reply 7 of 39
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,828member
    There has never been anything wrong with the battery on the Apple Watch. I don't know how or why anyone complains about the battery life. I use mine all day long every single day and the battery is never even close to being drained. I could easily get 2-3 days out of it if I really had to without needing to recharge the battery.

    What I wish is for my watch to be faster. Its pretty sluggish sometimes, even with the most basic tasks. I was hoping watchOS 3 would fix this and I guess it did a little but its still quite slow. I think the processor is clocked down way too far to save battery life.

    I'd also like to see the speech to text improved. Its pretty frustrating to use sometimes because it screws up a word and usually right in the middle or end of the sentence so you have to cancel the entire thing and try again, and sometimes try again. The scribble actually works pretty well but I'm not always in a position to use that. 


    edited January 2017 StrangeDays
  • Reply 8 of 39
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    I went with a Garmin watch over Apple mainly for battery life reasons (but several other lessor reasons as well), so if Apple can make significant gains in battery life it would be a very good thing.

    But I'm curious, what hardware and/or sensor do you think the Apple watch is missing? Other than a barometric altimeter, which some hiking watches have but which few people would need, what feature is the Apple watch missing that you are so desperately looking for?

    The only thing I can think of is a direct cellar connection which would be stupid to implement given the current technology unless you are willing to charge your watch every 4 hours. I'm sure they are working on figuring that out, but how about we get a watch that last for more than 18 hours on a charge (Apple's official battery life spec) before we start adding a bunch of new power hungry hardware features.
    albegarc80s_Apple_Guy
  • Reply 9 of 39
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    This is one of the few times I disagree with you...
    The introduction of the Apple Watch itself was revolutionary -- and that was only 2 years ago.  Since that time it has already seen significant improvement -- particularly by improvements to the OS.  But, while adding GPS & water proofing were more of a marketing improvement than a functional improvement, nonetheless, they were significant improvements.

    Compare the Apple Watch to the IPhone.   Both have been following similar evolutionary changes since their introduction.  Actually a better comparison might be to the IPod -- which grew into the IPhone and then continued to progress into its own, independent and indispensable product.

    What I see for the Apple Watch:
    1)  Continued evolutionary hardware improvements leading towards increasing independence from the IPhone -- just as the IPhone became increasingly independent from ITunes running on Macs & PCs.

    2)  Increasing strength and proliferation of 3rd Party apps will drive the dominance of the Apple Watch over its competitors (such as FitBit & Garmin) -- just as it did for the IPhone.

    3)  Growth of the Apple Watch into health related fields -- both medical and fitness -- as sensors grow more powerful & sensitive and expand grow beyond simply measuring heart rate.  However, for that growth to happen I think the Apple Watch may be limited by not being able to use its separate removable band.  That was probably a technical mistake made by Apple leadership when they started the watch off as a fashion accessory.
    albegarcsteveau
  • Reply 10 of 39
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 626member
    My Series 2 is plenty fast and unless you can get 4-5 days of battery, the current battery life is adequate for me. I would love to have LTE as long as it doesn't kill the battery. If that isn't possible, then an always on display would also be appreciated.

    I wear my Series 2 Apple Watch all day, every day and night. I usually charge when it gets around 50%--usually after about 24-36 hours depending on usage. This takes less than an hour. I could easily get 2 days of use before a battery warning if necessary.

    One trick is to save battery while sleeping so I can use a sleep tracking app. I turn off Raise to Wake and set the brightness to minimum. This is a quick and painless way to keep the watch going for more than 24 hours and easy enough to set back to normal when I get up. But I would love it if Apple gave me a quick way to set this in Watch OS 4.
    edited January 2017 calicyberzombieslprescottloquiturai46steveau
  • Reply 11 of 39
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    jdb8167 said:
    One trick to save battery while sleeping so I can use a sleep tracking app is to turn off Raise to Wake and set the brightness to minimum. This is a quick and painless way to keep the watch going for more than 24 hours and easy enough to set back to normal when I get up. But I would love it if Apple gave me a quick way to set this in Watch OS 4.
    With the swipe to change the watch faces option, it would be nice that this swipe could also change other settings to save time and maximize its utility by saving battery life and reducing your efforts to alter settings. For instance, when you switch to your "sleep mode" watch face the settings you mention disable. When you switch to your "theater mode" watch face* all your notifications get muted, raise to wake is disabled, and your brightness dims to the lowest setting (after several seconds when its assumed you're staying on that watch face for awhile).

    This has many real-world benefits, but to set-up manually this could be too complex for the average user, so I implore Apple to include several pre-made options that will automatically do this when enabled. When you choose that pre-made watch face it could also briefly show an overlay that says "sleep mode" or "theatre mode" so it's clear to the user what setup they've chosen.


    * This watch face you have to create yourself—right now. It's essentially removing every complication you can from the modular watch face and then making the time's color red, as this is the least obtrusive option.


    edited January 2017 caliStrangeDaysai46
  • Reply 12 of 39
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 626member
    I was thinking of putting it in Do Not Disturb as optional settings but your idea is very good too.
    cali
  • Reply 13 of 39
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    levi said:
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    Give me a break. Apple has no reason to hold back - they're moving as fast as the technology (and regulation) will allow them. Also even if we are to believe these are the only changes (which I'm skeptical of) I suspect that many current and prospective Apple Watch owners would be happy to buy a Watch with improved battery and processing performance. 
    Oh please unless the watch gets a week battery life who cares if you have to charge it every day or every two days? And for what people do with the watch how much improved processing power do they need? It's not like there's a gold rush of all these amazing apps developers are building for the watch. Outside of health what's the narrative for the Watch? Being a notification devices shouldn't take that much processing power.

    I think Apple has more important things to worry about with the Watch. Breakthroughs in the health arena will take time and some will be difficult if they require government approval. I'd rather than not have Apple launch a new Watch every year and instead maybe just introduce new bands and tweak the software to keep the device fresh.
    albegarcbrucemc
  • Reply 14 of 39
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    jdb8167 said:
    I was thinking of putting it in Do Not Disturb as optional settings but your idea is very good too.
    DnD is better if you want to be disturbed if certain people try to contract you or if the same number calls repeatedly, as per the iPhone's DnD settings. Turning off BT is better to conserve battery life. Each pre-built, active watch face option could allow you to change that, but I think DnD would be the better default option for "sleep mode."
    ai46
  • Reply 15 of 39
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    This is one of the few times I disagree with you...
    The introduction of the Apple Watch itself was revolutionary -- and that was only 2 years ago.  Since that time it has already seen significant improvement -- particularly by improvements to the OS.  But, while adding GPS & water proofing were more of a marketing improvement than a functional improvement, nonetheless, they were significant improvements.

    Compare the Apple Watch to the IPhone.   Both have been following similar evolutionary changes since their introduction.  Actually a better comparison might be to the IPod -- which grew into the IPhone and then continued to progress into its own, independent and indispensable product.

    What I see for the Apple Watch:
    1)  Continued evolutionary hardware improvements leading towards increasing independence from the IPhone -- just as the IPhone became increasingly independent from ITunes running on Macs & PCs.

    2)  Increasing strength and proliferation of 3rd Party apps will drive the dominance of the Apple Watch over its competitors (such as FitBit & Garmin) -- just as it did for the IPhone.

    3)  Growth of the Apple Watch into health related fields -- both medical and fitness -- as sensors grow more powerful & sensitive and expand grow beyond simply measuring heart rate.  However, for that growth to happen I think the Apple Watch may be limited by not being able to use its separate removable band.  That was probably a technical mistake made by Apple leadership when they started the watch off as a fashion accessory.
    I'm sorry what is revolutionary about the Watch compared to other wearable devices? It might be more popular/better selling because it's Apple but revolutionary? In what way? And I say that in comparison to Android Wear, Pebble etc. What about Apple Watch is revolutionary compared to those other devices?
    calibrucemc
  • Reply 16 of 39
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 626member
    I'm sorry what is revolutionary about the Watch compared to other wearable devices? It might be more popular/better selling because it's Apple but revolutionary? In what way? And I say that in comparison to Android Wear, Pebble etc. What about Apple Watch is revolutionary compared to those other devices?
    Like most Apple products, looking at it in isolation, it doesn't seem that innovative. But if you use it in conjunction with the rest of the Apple ecosystem, you get a multiplier effect.

    • I use my Apple Watch to unlock my Mac. I use this a dozen times a day.
    • I use my Apple Watch to turn on and off my home lights with HomeKit. I use this several times a day.
    • I use my Apple Watch/iPhone to turn off my home lights when I leave the house.
    • I use my Apple Watch to limit the number of notifications I get during working hours. VIP only email notifications. Only work related calendar events. etc. My iPhone is set to silent during work hours.
    • I use my Apple Watch to control my iPhone tracks and volume when playing music and Podcasts, this is especially useful when playing through my new AirPods because the Siri controls are not useful during working hours since I don't want to disturb others.
    • Siri integration across all my devices has too many uses to describe. Siri could be better but when it works, it is a big timesaver.

    Tight integration with iOS and macOS ecosystem is the innovative feature of watchOS 3 that no other smart watch can duplicate on any platform.

    edited January 2017 SoliStrangeDaysloquiturai46albegarcbrucemcwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 39
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    As always, incremental improvement is the name of the game. Compare the incremental iphone improvements from 2007 to 2016 and its dramatic over time. This is how apple rolls. How apple has always rolled. 

    http://www.macworld.com/article/1151235/macs/apple-rolls.html
    It's funny that when talking about Macs the narrative is the complete opposite for Apple fanboys. "Why would you want incremental changes every year!?"

    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    This is one of the few times I disagree with you...
    The introduction of the Apple Watch itself was revolutionary -- and that was only 2 years ago.  Since that time it has already seen significant improvement -- particularly by improvements to the OS.  But, while adding GPS & water proofing were more of a marketing improvement than a functional improvement, nonetheless, they were significant improvements.

    Compare the Apple Watch to the IPhone.   Both have been following similar evolutionary changes since their introduction.  Actually a better comparison might be to the IPod -- which grew into the IPhone and then continued to progress into its own, independent and indispensable product.

    What I see for the Apple Watch:
    1)  Continued evolutionary hardware improvements leading towards increasing independence from the IPhone -- just as the IPhone became increasingly independent from ITunes running on Macs & PCs.

    2)  Increasing strength and proliferation of 3rd Party apps will drive the dominance of the Apple Watch over its competitors (such as FitBit & Garmin) -- just as it did for the IPhone.

    3)  Growth of the Apple Watch into health related fields -- both medical and fitness -- as sensors grow more powerful & sensitive and expand grow beyond simply measuring heart rate.  However, for that growth to happen I think the Apple Watch may be limited by not being able to use its separate removable band.  That was probably a technical mistake made by Apple leadership when they started the watch off as a fashion accessory.
    I'm sorry what is revolutionary about the Watch compared to other wearable devices? It might be more popular/better selling because it's Apple but revolutionary? In what way? And I say that in comparison to Android Wear, Pebble etc. What about Apple Watch is revolutionary compared to those other devices?
    Typical troll bait from iHaters. "What was revolution about iPhone?" "What was revolutionary about Macs?" "What was revolutionary about iPod?!! My CD player couldn't play 100,000 albums!!!!!"

    dont do that.

    what really pisses me off is that android wear was rushed because everyone knew Apple was working on the Watch. Android dropped a steaming turd and now Apple's product is being compared to it as if it contributed anything.



    albegarcwatto_cobrarf9
  • Reply 18 of 39
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    jdb8167 said:
    I'm sorry what is revolutionary about the Watch compared to other wearable devices? It might be more popular/better selling because it's Apple but revolutionary? In what way? And I say that in comparison to Android Wear, Pebble etc. What about Apple Watch is revolutionary compared to those other devices?
    Like most Apple products, looking at it in isolation, it doesn't seem that innovative. But if you use it in conjunction with the rest of the Apple ecosystem, you get a multiplier effect.

    • I use my Apple Watch to unlock my Mac. I use this a dozen times a day.
    • I use my Apple Watch to turn on and off my home lights with HomeKit. I use this several times a day.
    • I use my Apple Watch/iPhone to turn off my home lights when I leave the house.
    • I use my Apple Watch to limit the number of notifications I get during working hours. VIP only email notifications. Only work related calendar events. etc. My iPhone is set to silent during work hours.
    • I use my Apple Watch to control my iPhone tracks and volume when playing music and Podcasts, this is especially useful when playing through my new AirPods because the Siri controls are not useful during working hours since I don't want to disturb others.
    • Siri integration across all my devices has too many uses to describe. Siri could be better but when it works, it is a big timesaver.

    Tight integration with iOS and macOS ecosystem is the innovative feature of watchOS 3 that no other smart watch can duplicate on any platform.

    I'd say the Taptic Engine and Force/3D touch were innovative.
    SoliStrangeDaysalbegarcwatto_cobrarf9
  • Reply 19 of 39
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,912member
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    This is one of the few times I disagree with you...
    The introduction of the Apple Watch itself was revolutionary -- and that was only 2 years ago.  Since that time it has already seen significant improvement -- particularly by improvements to the OS.  But, while adding GPS & water proofing were more of a marketing improvement than a functional improvement, nonetheless, they were significant improvements.
    What? GPS and waterproofing are major hardware improvements that add completely new functional use cases. How are those "just marketing"? Explain further, please.
    edited January 2017 cali
  • Reply 20 of 39
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,912member

    levi said:
    I hope this is BS. Another year of mostly incremental changes to Apple Watch is no good. If all we're getting is a new SiP and watchOS 4 Apple might as well not release a new watch this year. 
    Give me a break. Apple has no reason to hold back - they're moving as fast as the technology (and regulation) will allow them. Also even if we are to believe these are the only changes (which I'm skeptical of) I suspect that many current and prospective Apple Watch owners would be happy to buy a Watch with improved battery and processing performance. 
    Oh please unless the watch gets a week battery life who cares if you have to charge it every day or every two days? And for what people do with the watch how much improved processing power do they need? It's not like there's a gold rush of all these amazing apps developers are building for the watch. Outside of health what's the narrative for the Watch? Being a notification devices shouldn't take that much processing power.

    I think Apple has more important things to worry about with the Watch. Breakthroughs in the health arena will take time and some will be difficult if they require government approval. I'd rather than not have Apple launch a new Watch every year and instead maybe just introduce new bands and tweak the software to keep the device fresh.
    Aren't they on a two-year cycle so far? The Series 2 was two years after the original was announced, wasn't it?
    ai46watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.