Component supplier Lite-On reportedly supplier of wireless charging components destined fo...

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2017
Ongoing rumors that Apple will introduce wireless charging to a future generation of iPhone have been bolstered by a new report, with supply chain sources claiming that Lite-On Semiconductor has received a sizable order to supply components for the forthcoming "iPhone 8."




DigiTimes reports that sources of the Chinese-language Commercial Times allege Lite-On Semi obtained "half of the orders for GPP bridge rectifiers that will be used in the wireless charger for the upcoming iPhones."

Lite-on Semi responded to the report in a filing with the Taiwan Stock Exchange, advising it does not comment on customers or orders. In response to the rumor, the company's share price rallied to its daily 10% limit, closing today at NT$28.75 ($0.91).

If true, this could make Lite-on Semi a second provider of wireless charging components to Apple, or contradict a previous inference. Late last year, wireless charging startup Energous signed a deal with Dialog Semiconductor to develop and market hardware components, with Energous CEO Steve Rizzone making a a tenuous reference to Apple being a major customer during CES.

Wireless charging has been a staple of rumors for future iPhones for some time, though it may take a different form to typical charging systems used by Android smartphones. Energous has demonstrated a way to transmit energy over a long distance, instead of relying on inductive charging coils that require devices to be placed on a mat. If practical, the Energous technology potentially allows a properly-equipped iPhone to be charged while in use.

Lite-On has been a component supplier for Apple for more than a decade. It is not known if the Lite-On components identified in the report can be used for long-range charging or for more traditional wireless charging purposes.

Apple itself has also received patents relating to long-range wireless charging of low-power devices, demonstrating it has previously investigated using the technology in its products. Apple currently only uses wireless charging in the Apple Watch.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,506member
    Damn it! Got to the 2nd paragraph before I realised it was Digitimes. Three seconds I won't get back. 
  • Reply 2 of 13
    What would the power source look like?
    What kind of range are we talking about?
    Could there be ill affects on human health to using such a thing?

    I was really hoping Apple was going to perfect their patent from years ago and achieve solar receptors under the glass, front and back. Guess that is still off in the future.

    But the concept is likely the same. Going to a glass backed iPhone means sensors/receptors under the glass to absorb the charge.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    I don't get, when they have the technology for the apple watch. that they don't apply it to the phone.
  • Reply 4 of 13
    Lite-On. I haven't heard that name since I owned some of their CD burners and video CD recorders about 10-15 years ago! All junk at the time. Cheap and worked for a little while before failing. No support.
    netrox
  • Reply 5 of 13
    yanimac said:
    I don't get, when they have the technology for the apple watch. that they don't apply it to the phone.
    Magnetic induction?

    How is that more appealing than a cable you plug in which doesn't interfere with operation of the device? I see no benefit in it whatsoever. It makes sense for Apple Watch because you are definitively not using the device when its charging.
    netmageRayz2016StrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 13
    netmagenetmage Posts: 173member
    The so-called "wireless" charging available on other phones and the Apple Watch is really just plug-less charging with a direct trade-off between usability while charging and having to plug in - a decent dock gives most of the advantages of plug-less. True wireless is what Apple is hopefully working on. 
    Dreid1StrangeDays
  • Reply 7 of 13
    yanimac said:
    I don't get, when they have the technology for the apple watch. that they don't apply it to the phone.
    One difference is that phones often have CASES, whereas the Watch does not. Cases probably block inductive charging.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    Jdmr1701Jdmr1701 Posts: 8unconfirmed, member
    yanimac said:
    I don't get, when they have the technology for the apple watch. that they don't apply it to the phone.
    One difference is that phones often have CASES, whereas the Watch does not. Cases probably block inductive charging.
    Metal cases will block inductive charging, plastic cases wont. I think Apple didn't see the appeal of wireless charging on a mat, like the Android phones. I had one for a while and it was cool but was more of a cool tech thing. I still had to leave it on the pad. If I was trading off slower charging at least I could move it around. The Energous tech they have shown to wirelessly charge up to 15 feet away from base. I'm sure as you move away it will drop off some, but if they can get 1A charge within that range, and plug in for "quick charge" which is also rumored, I cant wait!
  • Reply 9 of 13
    Jdmr1701Jdmr1701 Posts: 8unconfirmed, member
    I think the 7s and 7s+ that will be "lower end phones" to the possible iPhone 8 will also have this wireless charging tech. Possibly to make it more appealing to those who may have trouble obtaining the iPhone 8 due to possible shortage of devices due to OLED constraints.
  • Reply 10 of 13
    netroxnetrox Posts: 563member
    Contrary to what people say, the "wireless charging" of Apple Watch is NOT wireless. It's inductive charging. 
  • Reply 11 of 13
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,622member
    netrox said:
    Contrary to what people say, the "wireless charging" of Apple Watch is NOT wireless. It's inductive charging. 
    Inductive is a kind of wireless --------- conductor with electrons fluctuating ----- creates electromagnetic field that fluctuates --- UNDUCING movement in the electrons at a distance from the first ones. If the field radiates around the first conductor, the energy induced in the second one (if there is no friction) would decrease to the square of distance. If you have a lot of friction in the destination  conductor/pan and a great amount of power you got a induction stovetop....

    That's why the mats and the inductive chargers need to be close.

    Systems that charge long distance can direct those beams more narrowly so there is less loss due to distance; all the energy is directed towards the second conductor.
    Same system used by beam forming routers.
  • Reply 12 of 13
    sog35 said:
    netmage said:
    The so-called "wireless" charging available on other phones and the Apple Watch is really just plug-less charging with a direct trade-off between usability while charging and having to plug in - a decent dock gives most of the advantages of plug-less. True wireless is what Apple is hopefully working on. 
    I agree.

    I have a dock that can power 2 iPhones, 2 ipads, and one more device. All using just one power plug and saves a ton of space. 

    i doubt 'wireless' charging would be better, faster, and more reliable
    which dock is that?
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