Samsung Galaxy S8 to miss Mobile World Congress debut in aftermath of Note 7 fires

Posted:
in iPhone
Owing to precautions set up in the wake of the Galaxy Note 7, Samsung's next rival to the Apple iPhone -- the Galaxy S8 -- won't be revealed at late February's Mobile World Congress show in Barcelona, the company's mobile head revealed on Monday.




In speaking to the press, Koh Dong-jin didn't offer a firm timeline for the S8's arrival, according to Reuters. Koh remarked that at Samsung, lessons from the Note 7's failure are now "deeply reflected in our culture and process," and that the company's Electronics division will be "working hard to regain consumer trust."

Samsung has traditionally used Mobile World Congress to debut its Galaxy S phones, which are often the bestselling Android devices in many countries. New testing procedures, however, are expected to delay the S8's arrival, particularly since the company can't afford a repeat of the Note 7 with its most popular line.

In previous years, the debut of a new flagship Samsung phone at the Mobile World Congress, ultimately led to a March shipment of the device. It is not clear if a March launch of the device will happen, or how far a release would be pushed back making any new phone shipment that much closer to the expected debut of a new iPhone in the fall.

On Sunday, Samsung announced the conclusion of its own investigation into the Note 7, finding that two separate battery defects were responsible for the fires, which triggered two recalls and the discontinuation of the product entirely.

The initial problem involved a flaw in the upper-right corner of the battery which triggered short circuits, Samsung said. After the first recall, an ultrasonic welding defect came into play.

In all the debacle will cost Samsung over $5 billion. On Monday the company said it hadn't decided whether it will reuse parts from the recalled devices, or sell any refurbished Note 7 models. The latter option may be unlikely however, given the negative publicity surrounding the product.

The Note 7's flaws may have been triggered by a rush to take more sales away from the iPhone 7, which Samsung executives weren't expecting to have any major improvements. Indeed the phone is mostly a minor upgrade from the iPhone 6s, except for the 7 Plus, which has a dual-lens camera.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    They don't a sound too confident.

    most Samsung users are sheep anyway so no reason to "gain trust".
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,312member
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    brakkenlamboaudi4watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 20
    irelandireland Posts: 17,671member
    The Samsung brand can burn in the fire they created for themselves.
    caliwatto_cobraSpamSandwich
  • Reply 4 of 20
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Something just dawned on me...

    maybe they're not showing the iKnockoff because it's a fire hazard? I'm kinda thinking Mobile World Congress didn't want to risk burning the place down and politely asked Sammy to not bring it in. Their statement sounds like BS. 

    Also I hate how Mobile World Congress has turned into a big gathering of iClones with zero innovation all patting each other on the back.
    brakkenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 20
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,716member
    This is why Apple announces its products on its own time. There is no rushing to meet a third party's de facto deadline. 
    caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 20
    cali said:
    They don't a sound too confident.

    most Samsung users are sheep anyway so no reason to "gain trust".
    The same can be said about Apple users, or at least that was the case in Jobs's time.
    brucemc
  • Reply 7 of 20
    This would seem to be good news for continued sales of the iPhone 7 and 7+,  wouldn't it? No new competition for a longer time. 
    caliradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,979member
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    This is very true. This however would never be true if the same thing happened to Apple with the iPhone (or any of their products for that matter). Apple is held to a higher standard which isn't necessarily a bad thing. I still think though that there are folks out there that are just waiting for Apple to screw up like this. They cannot wait for Apple to fail just to have a major story to write about. Anything to get clicks and views. 
    caliStrangeDaysbrakkenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 20
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,979member
    jungmark said:
    This is why Apple announces its products on its own time. There is no rushing to meet a third party's de facto deadline. 
    Exactly! Yes, it may piss people off because Apple doesn't seem to be releasing anything but when it does come out its a good product. This is one of the reasons why Apple pulled out of all MacWorld Expo's. They didn't want to be tied to specific dates for product releases. 
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 20
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    simply258 said:
    cali said:
    They don't a sound too confident.

    most Samsung users are sheep anyway so no reason to "gain trust".
    The same can be said about Apple users, or at least that was the case in Jobs's time.
    Same can be said for people who buy Coca Cola instead off Shasta or 7 Up instead on Twist Up.

    When's the last time iPhones burned down several homes, cars and planes?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 20
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    edited January 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    *Techies of course almost all hate Apple; it's a part of their culture. They don't know what they'd do with themselves without being able to hate Apple. They're like the joker to Apple's batman. Techies to Apple: "I don't want to kill you, what would I do without you?"
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    simply258 said:
    cali said:
    They don't a sound too confident.

    most Samsung users are sheep anyway so no reason to "gain trust".
    The same can be said about Apple users, or at least that was the case in Jobs's time.
    Oh really? How do you figure? I'm of the impression Apple fans are loyal because Apple makes the best OS, notebook, phone, tablet, etc... Not because "cult". Can you be more specific?
    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 20
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    Apple does extensive advertising around their products.  Apple has a few events each year with key notes where they highlight new products / features / releases, that generate a significant amount of press (good or bad).  

    How are they horrible at PR?  What do you recommend they do?  And if your answer is (as per Sog35) to issue a press release every time there is some negative comments made by media, bloggers, or companies - then you clearly aren't living in reality.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 20
    Maybe if they promise to stop vilifying Apple and stop copying, they can beg Apple to use their chip fabs again...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    brucemc said:
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    Apple does extensive advertising around their products.  Apple has a few events each year with key notes where they highlight new products / features / releases, that generate a significant amount of press (good or bad).  

    How are they horrible at PR?  What do you recommend they do?  And if your answer is (as per Sog35) to issue a press release every time there is some negative comments made by media, bloggers, or companies - then you clearly aren't living in reality.
    Hi Bruce, I'm a fan of your posts. My answer is not to release stale press releases, or, as sog has suggested, send some goons to intimidate reporters lol.

    Since you asked.. firstly, what Apple has been doing so far has been excellent, just not enough of it (e.g. quality ads, the thoughtful and interesting interviews with Apple execs, for example the articles that came out in Fast Company). The events are fantastic, but when they're reported on by the press it's a feeding frenzy, and the reporting often lacks significant context (e.g. the strangely confused and negative reaction to the MBP, which produced a meaningful, practical, and non-gimmicky advancement in the UI that was and continues to be underappreciated).

    Here's a few thoughts on other ideas off the top of my head:
    -have an Apple twitter account that quickly addresses issues with a quick statement and link in order to mitigate the enormous amount of click-bait headlines, maybe label it "Apple Info" or something similar, or maybe use an exec twitter, like Phil or Tim
    -be more proactive about promoting the good things Apple does as a company, like create succinct (i.e. non-preachy) ads about:
    --environmental measures:
    ---mitigating deforestation is my personal favorite Apple environmental move
    ---Liam makes for a great visual, and I think I read, buried in some obscure article, that when Apple recycles a phone it breaks down every component, and that even the vapors produced in the process are accounted for; that's amazing, and it should be promoted.
    ---the solar installations integrated with farmland in china is very impressive
    --worker responsibility: "we've been working hard for well over a decade to improve the lives of the people that build our products. some of the reports that we have been releasing on a yearly basis have gotten a lot of negative attention, but we're proud of the things we've been able to accomplish so far.. employee education, safety, regular audits, etc.
    --security and privacy (e.g. every person I've talked to that has been hesitant about Apple Pay cited security concerns, ironically)
    -ads that convey Apples contributions and innovation in the tech industry (e.g. I can't believe there hasn't been a commercial showing how hilariously cumbersome pre-iPhone phones were relative to what has come since, and even show an android in there to drive the point home).
    -adds that convey Apple's philosophy/ethos (e.g. I'd love it if Apple ran/promoted that video about design where it talked about good design being one 'yes' to 1,000 'no's, that was so great).
    -more proactive in general with the media; doing more advertising will help accomplish this. Also, it seems, and this is totally speculation, that Apple is a bit lackadaisical when it comes to the enormous amount of misinformation and half-truths that are regularly published as articles by popular publishers (e.g. forbes, BI, CNBC).

    I think doing these things (along with plenty of other things I'm not thinking about right now) will go a long way to helping people understand Apple as a company, and will significantly reduce the negativity that is generated about Apple.
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 17 of 20
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,133moderator
    brucemc said:
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    Apple does extensive advertising around their products.  Apple has a few events each year with key notes where they highlight new products / features / releases, that generate a significant amount of press (good or bad).  

    How are they horrible at PR?  What do you recommend they do?  And if your answer is (as per Sog35) to issue a press release every time there is some negative comments made by media, bloggers, or companies - then you clearly aren't living in reality.
    Hi Bruce, I'm a fan of your posts. My answer is not to release stale press releases, or, as sog has suggested, send some goons to intimidate reporters lol.

    Since you asked.. firstly, what Apple has been doing so far has been excellent, just not enough of it (e.g. quality ads, the thoughtful and interesting interviews with Apple execs, for example the articles that came out in Fast Company). The events are fantastic, but when they're reported on by the press it's a feeding frenzy, and the reporting often lacks significant context (e.g. the strangely confused and negative reaction to the MBP, which produced a meaningful, practical, and non-gimmicky advancement in the UI that was and continues to be underappreciated).

    Here's a few thoughts on other ideas off the top of my head:
    -have an Apple twitter account that quickly addresses issues with a quick statement and link in order to mitigate the enormous amount of click-bait headlines, maybe label it "Apple Info" or something similar, or maybe use an exec twitter, like Phil or Tim
    -be more proactive about promoting the good things Apple does as a company, like create succinct (i.e. non-preachy) ads about:
    --environmental measures:
    ---mitigating deforestation is my personal favorite Apple environmental move
    ---Liam makes for a great visual, and I think I read, buried in some obscure article, that when Apple recycles a phone it breaks down every component, and that even the vapors produced in the process are accounted for; that's amazing, and it should be promoted.
    ---the solar installations integrated with farmland in china is very impressive
    --worker responsibility: "we've been working hard for well over a decade to improve the lives of the people that build our products. some of the reports that we have been releasing on a yearly basis have gotten a lot of negative attention, but we're proud of the things we've been able to accomplish so far.. employee education, safety, regular audits, etc.
    --security and privacy (e.g. every person I've talked to that has been hesitant about Apple Pay cited security concerns, ironically)
    -ads that convey Apples contributions and innovation in the tech industry (e.g. I can't believe there hasn't been a commercial showing how hilariously cumbersome pre-iPhone phones were relative to what has come since, and even show an android in there to drive the point home).
    -adds that convey Apple's philosophy/ethos (e.g. I'd love it if Apple ran/promoted that video about design where it talked about good design being one 'yes' to 1,000 'no's, that was so great).
    -more proactive in general with the media; doing more advertising will help accomplish this. Also, it seems, and this is totally speculation, that Apple is a bit lackadaisical when it comes to the enormous amount of misinformation and half-truths that are regularly published as articles by popular publishers (e.g. forbes, BI, CNBC).

    I think doing these things (along with plenty of other things I'm not thinking about right now) will go a long way to helping people understand Apple as a company, and will significantly reduce the negativity that is generated about Apple.
    Here's the thing.  Apple already garners the vast majority of global profits in the PC, tablet, and smartphone segments.  So why do more to burnish their brand, which could have the opposite effect (people would attack the company for lack of humility)?  The profits Apple takes also speak to the timing of their product releases.  Apple is smart to take the time to get it right when incorporating new innovations.  They can speed up if they see that their global profit share begins to come under pressure, but it's counter productive to speed things up when there's no more profits to take.  Apple knows there's just so much money consumers have to spend each year in a given category, and as long as they scoop most of those profits they can cruise along in that category, despite the naysayers complaints about lack of innovation or Apple being behind others in bringing to market new features.  Apple knows that its future growth lies in new categories and it's applying plenty of R&D in several directions to create products that will give them that growth.  Meanwhile, they turn the dial just enough to maintain profit dominance in existing categories.  

    And, meanwhile, even with all the years of negative articles and rants by those who have an interest in seeing Apple fail, Blackberry, Nokia, HP/Dell/etc (all failed in the tablet space), and a host of other companies have collapsed or all but collapsed in the face of competition brought by Apple.  Without Apple ever mentioning any by name or fighting the good public relations fight so many continually suggest Apple needs to fight.  
    edited January 2017 watto_cobrakevin kee
  • Reply 18 of 20
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,979member
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    So basically, you wanted Apple to run smear campaign against Samsung and the issue with their Note 7? This is basically what Samsung does to Apple every day in their ads and I think most would agree here that its a very sick way of advertising. I don't think this is what Apple wants to be, nor what it wants people to think the kind of company Apple is and certainly not a road they want to go down. Apple doesn't need to do anything with Samsung. That would be what Samsung wants...a response to everything they do. The last thing we need is a pissing match back and forth. That doesn't do anyone any good in the end. I want Apple's ads too show what you can do with a product, not what someone else's isn't doing. This is what I like about Apple's ads, they tell you about THEIR product, not someone else's. 
    edited January 2017 kevin kee
  • Reply 19 of 20
    macxpress said:
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    So basically, you wanted Apple to run smear campaign against Samsung and the issue with their Note 7? This is basically what Samsung does to Apple every day in their ads and I think most would agree here that its a very sick way of advertising. I don't think this is what Apple wants to be, nor what it wants people to think the kind of company Apple is and certainly not a road they want to go down. Apple doesn't need to do anything with Samsung. That would be what Samsung wants...a response to everything they do. The last thing we need is a pissing match back and forth. That doesn't do anyone any good in the end. I want Apple's ads too show what you can do with a product, not what someone else's isn't doing. This is what I like about Apple's ads, they tell you about THEIR product, not someone else's. 
    What? No where at all did I even insinuate Apple run a smear campaign against samsung. Don't engage samsung directly at all, of course. Just don't allow for a vaccum of silence that allows samsung to spread myths, FUD, etc. Be proactive with positive messages about Apple so that the negativity from samsung or anyone else can't take hold like it has.

    With due respect, it seems you nearly completely missed my point(s).
  • Reply 20 of 20
    brucemc said:
    lkrupp said:
    Let’s get real. Samsung is not going to suffer one iota from this debacle. For all the snark about iSheep, cults, religion, lemmings the Samsheep are 100 times worse and more cult-like than Apple fanboys could ever be. Just consider the thousands of Note 7s out there that people refuse to turn in and continue to use. Tech writers to this day praise the Note 7 as the second coming of the Messiah and the fact that they explode is only an unfortunate hiccup. When the Galaxy 8 and Note 8 come out it will be business as usual. All is already forgiven. It never happened. Deal with it.
    Exactly. The cognitive dissonance that led to the rationalizations from the samsheep aren't just going to go away due to logic.

    For EVERY person ('normal', non-techie)* I have talked to who owns an android, irrational anti-Apple sentiment was a key factor in their decision (and in many cases people are anti-Apple based on a complete 180 degree flipped view about issues that Apple is the clear leader in).

    It seems clear to me that the popularity of android in general (among potential iPhone customers, not the third world) is in large part due to the vacuum left by VERY POOR PR on Apple's part.

    Samsung (and in large part the tech media in general for some reason) has waged all-out PR war with Apple, and for some time now. But Apple barely responds.

    Taking the high road may be the best strategy for an individual, but not for a company who's brand relies on mindshare and public perception.

    Apple's minimal/lack-of response is by default accepted as tacit acknowledgement of the myths perpetuated by the Apple haters. It's just human nature.

    Thankfully Apple is very good at what it does, and rarely makes any significant mistakes (rarely still, if at all, makes a big mistake); Apple is also protected by the fact that it makes great products.

    However, for the reasons I stated above, any misstep is blown vastly out of proportion (as often occurs). and god forbid Apple makes a mistake that is actually significant... And if Apple's competition ever starts coming close to creating the quality products that Apple does, the negativity (based on myths) in the public perception at large will make it very easy for people to switch.
    Apple does extensive advertising around their products.  Apple has a few events each year with key notes where they highlight new products / features / releases, that generate a significant amount of press (good or bad).  

    How are they horrible at PR?  What do you recommend they do?  And if your answer is (as per Sog35) to issue a press release every time there is some negative comments made by media, bloggers, or companies - then you clearly aren't living in reality.
    Hi Bruce, I'm a fan of your posts. My answer is not to release stale press releases, or, as sog has suggested, send some goons to intimidate reporters lol.

    Since you asked.. firstly, what Apple has been doing so far has been excellent, just not enough of it (e.g. quality ads, the thoughtful and interesting interviews with Apple execs, for example the articles that came out in Fast Company). The events are fantastic, but when they're reported on by the press it's a feeding frenzy, and the reporting often lacks significant context (e.g. the strangely confused and negative reaction to the MBP, which produced a meaningful, practical, and non-gimmicky advancement in the UI that was and continues to be underappreciated).

    Here's a few thoughts on other ideas off the top of my head:
    -have an Apple twitter account that quickly addresses issues with a quick statement and link in order to mitigate the enormous amount of click-bait headlines, maybe label it "Apple Info" or something similar, or maybe use an exec twitter, like Phil or Tim
    -be more proactive about promoting the good things Apple does as a company, like create succinct (i.e. non-preachy) ads about:
    --environmental measures:
    ---mitigating deforestation is my personal favorite Apple environmental move
    ---Liam makes for a great visual, and I think I read, buried in some obscure article, that when Apple recycles a phone it breaks down every component, and that even the vapors produced in the process are accounted for; that's amazing, and it should be promoted.
    ---the solar installations integrated with farmland in china is very impressive
    --worker responsibility: "we've been working hard for well over a decade to improve the lives of the people that build our products. some of the reports that we have been releasing on a yearly basis have gotten a lot of negative attention, but we're proud of the things we've been able to accomplish so far.. employee education, safety, regular audits, etc.
    --security and privacy (e.g. every person I've talked to that has been hesitant about Apple Pay cited security concerns, ironically)
    -ads that convey Apples contributions and innovation in the tech industry (e.g. I can't believe there hasn't been a commercial showing how hilariously cumbersome pre-iPhone phones were relative to what has come since, and even show an android in there to drive the point home).
    -adds that convey Apple's philosophy/ethos (e.g. I'd love it if Apple ran/promoted that video about design where it talked about good design being one 'yes' to 1,000 'no's, that was so great).
    -more proactive in general with the media; doing more advertising will help accomplish this. Also, it seems, and this is totally speculation, that Apple is a bit lackadaisical when it comes to the enormous amount of misinformation and half-truths that are regularly published as articles by popular publishers (e.g. forbes, BI, CNBC).

    I think doing these things (along with plenty of other things I'm not thinking about right now) will go a long way to helping people understand Apple as a company, and will significantly reduce the negativity that is generated about Apple.
    Here's the thing.  Apple already garners the vast majority of global profits in the PC, tablet, and smartphone segments.  So why do more to burnish their brand, which could have the opposite effect (people would attack the company for lack of humility)?  The profits Apple takes also speak to the timing of their product releases.  Apple is smart to take the time to get it right when incorporating new innovations.  They can speed up if they see that their global profit share begins to come under pressure, but it's counter productive to speed things up when there's no more profits to take.  Apple knows there's just so much money consumers have to spend each year in a given category, and as long as they scoop most of those profits they can cruise along in that category, despite the naysayers complaints about lack of innovation or Apple being behind others in bringing to market new features.  Apple knows that its future growth lies in new categories and it's applying plenty of R&D in several directions to create products that will give them that growth.  Meanwhile, they turn the dial just enough to maintain profit dominance in existing categories.  

    And, meanwhile, even with all the years of negative articles and rants by those who have an interest in seeing Apple fail, Blackberry, Nokia, HP/Dell/etc (all failed in the tablet space), and a host of other companies have collapsed or all but collapsed in the face of competition brought by Apple.  Without Apple ever mentioning any by name or fighting the good public relations fight so many continually suggest Apple needs to fight.  
    So are you saying that the only reason to address the constant negativity directed at Apple is to increase the bottom line? Admittedly, I may be twisting your argument with that question, but it's to make a point. Don't get me wrong, you are making a great point, that Apple doesn't need to do what I am suggesting in order to be successful, as Apple is currently very successful. I agree with that fully. but I still believe %100 in what I've been saying, and I believe there are many other good reasons (besides a near-term bump in the bottom line) to promote a more truthful, positive image of the company:

    -Further bolster the brand. If someone criticizes Apple now or in the future, the counter argument can't (or maybe I'm saying it shouldn't) be "Apple is successful." That lacks meaning. By making people more aware of Apple's qualities, there will be less criticisms, and the brand will be even stronger, and more resilient for the future. For a current example that is frustrating, the cynicism and myths out there lead a lot of people to be suspicious of privacy and security (as I mentioned previously), which impacts people's willingness to use Apple Pay.
    -reduce the inane, reflexive criticism of future Apple products. After being a clear leader in innovation, Apple is still heavily criticized with every product release. Yet the ridiculous holo lens vaporware (which even hilariously boasted watching an AR movie on a blank wall), surface imac thing, and surface book all get rave reviews. If there wasn't so much false negativity about Apple floating around out there, the cynicism and ridiculous criticisms wouldn't stick.
    -Allow Apple to be truthful  to what it is, a humanistic company that values integrity. Allowing so many myths out three that are contrary to this gives a false impression of the kind of company Apple is, I believe.
    -Help Apple continue to grow in the intermediate and long term. Why leave money on the table due to myths and FUD that keep people away from Apple as a company?
    -Might reduce the negative impact on the stock (not a huge priority). Apple's valuation would look a lot more ridiculous if there weren't so much negativity that so many people are actually considering that Apple will be doomed any day now.
    -Protect Apple in case of mistake or catastrophe (e.g. earthquake or kaiju destroys TSMC plants or something). People are not going to be loyal because Apple is successful. They will be loyal to a company that the are familiar with and that they believe is a good company.

    Right now, for a lot (perhaps most?) consumers, Apple's goodwill comes from is great record in making great products. But why not leverage Apple's other strength as well, its qualities as a company? Apple clearly sees this as a positive thing (e.g. environmental issues touted at last Spring's keynote), who why not go from what seems to be the bare minimum (putting information out on a non-promoted website, or in a presentation, which seemed to go largely ignored), to more actively promoting Apple's genuinely positive attributes. I think Apple could easily avoid seeming arrogant about it; promoting humanistic qualities and providing information does not seem like it would come across as arrogant.
    edited January 2017
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