Google sells off Terra Bella satellite unit to Planet Labs

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2017
Alphabet's Google on Friday confirmed a deal to sell off its satellite mapping business, Terra Bella, to Planet Labs -- which despite earlier speculation is unlikely to affect Google Maps or by extension its main competition, Apple Maps.




Google will continue to license imaging data from Planet in a multi-year contract, the latter company said. It will, however, be turning over control of its seven SkySat satellites, which have submeter resolution enabling extremely high detail.

Planet was already operating a much larger fleet of its own satellites, but with a lower resolution between 3 and 5 meters (about 9.8 to 16.4 feet).

When the deal was still in talks reports suggested that Alphabet and Google were trying to cut costs, given the expense of launching and operating satellites. Planet, meanwhile, was allegedly struggling to find customers.

As a part of the acquisition, "a number" of Terra Bella workers will make the jump to Planet. How many people might remain at Google or get laid off was unmentioned, as were any other terms of the deal.

Past rumors hinted that Planet might be offering a combination of cash and equity, and as a startup, even tapping into venture funding to help pay.

If nothing else the sale may put Google and Apple on a more level playing field. Apple is heavily reliant on third-party mapping data, even if the company has been driving vehicles around cities to collect its own.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 251member
    We'll they'll need the money. Their new fully operational Death Star Isn't likely to come on line for another 5 years. So it's a good call by alphabet. The Death Star will have many additional functionalities 
    viclauyyclostkiwi
  • Reply 2 of 12
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    mejsricidreyviclauyyclostkiwiwatto_cobramdriftmeyer
  • Reply 3 of 12
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,414member
    cali said:
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    Yup. Before Ruth Porat came on board so many of the Google acquisitions seemed like spur-of-the-moment buys, not well thought thru. She's brought a little sense to it all. 
    edited February 2017
  • Reply 4 of 12
    gatorguy said:
    cali said:
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    Yup. Before Ruth Porat came on board so many of the Google acquisitions seemed like spur-of-the-moment buys. She's brought a little sense to it all. 
    What a relief. Now I can finally sleep at night.
    StrangeDayslostkiwipscooter63SpamSandwich
  • Reply 5 of 12
    Wall Street will not consider this a failure. It will be overlooked and likely considered a smart move by Google to shed some fat to build a leaner company. If Apple were to sell any unit of its business it would be said that Apple is falling apart and would be all over the internet as precursor to Apple's doom. I'm sure the analysts will be saying that will be much easier for Google to reach $1000 a share now that more fat is being cut away. Supposedly investors love Google for its moonshot projects which in the future will being bringing in huge amounts of revenue. How's that Google Loon doing?
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,461member
    cali said:
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    Good point. 
  • Reply 7 of 12
    Breaking news:  "Planet Labs" just  renamed to "Skynet"
  • Reply 8 of 12

    Mmm...

    I've been playing around with Sketchup a 3D Modeling program.  It was initially developed by 2 independent developers in 2000, then sold to Google in 2006.  Google sold Sketchup to Trimble Navigation in 2012.

    SketchUp (formerly Google Sketchup) is a 3D modeling computer program for a wide range of drawing applications such as architectural, interior design, landscape architecture, civil and mechanical engineering, film, and video gamedesign—and available in a freeware version, SketchUp Make, and a paid version with additional functionality, SketchUp Pro.

    SketchUp is currently owned by Trimble Navigation,[1][4] a mapping, surveying, and navigation equipment company.[5] The program's authors describe it as easy to use.[6] There is an online open source library of free model assemblies (e.g. windows, doors, automobiles), 3D Warehouse, to which users may contribute models. The program includes drawing layout functionality, allows surface rendering in variable "styles", supports third-party "plug-in" programs hosted on a site called Extension Warehouse to provide other capabilities (e.g. near photo-realistic rendering), and enables placement of its models within Google Earth.[7]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SketchUp

    This is different from a CAD App which normally starts with 2D drawings.  With Sketchup, you jump right in and start modeling in 3D and later export to 2D CAD apps as necessary.

    Sketchup is written in C and is available for macOS and Windows.  You can write program extensions in Ruby -- available as a collection from SMustard (think about it).  In addition, there is an online warehouse of thousands of Sketchup models, e.g. cars, buildings, furniture, landscapes, etc.

    https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com



    What is of most interest to me is having Sketchup run on an iPad Pro with Apple Pencil,  with program     extensions written in Swift.


    edited February 2017 ravnorodomSpamSandwich
  • Reply 9 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,530member
    gatorguy said:
    cali said:
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    Yup. Before Ruth Porat came on board so many of the Google acquisitions seemed like spur-of-the-moment buys, not well thought thru. She's brought a little sense to it all. 
    Thanks to our resident Google sycophant for enlightening us poor Apple lovers.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,414member
    lkrupp said:
    gatorguy said:
    cali said:
    Notice something?

    Goog is always selling off companies/tech it acquired while I can't remember the last time Apple sold any part of its business. Can you?

    tells me Apple actually buys things it can utilize and....utilizes them bringing in profit. 
    Yup. Before Ruth Porat came on board so many of the Google acquisitions seemed like spur-of-the-moment buys, not well thought thru. She's brought a little sense to it all. 
    Thanks to our resident Google sycophant for enlightening us poor Apple lovers.
     http://www.ehow.com/how_12078098_make-cocoon-craft.html
    :)

    If you don't want to know anything about Google then why are you bothering to read an article about them? Just skip past it. It's silly to object to a post that adds background to the story.
    edited February 2017
  • Reply 11 of 12

    Mmm...

    I've been playing around with Sketchup a 3D Modeling program.  It was initially developed by 2 independent developers in 2000, then sold to Google in 2006.  Google sold Sketchup to Trimble Navigation in 2012.

    SketchUp (formerly Google Sketchup) is a 3D modeling computer program for a wide range of drawing applications such as architectural, interior design, landscape architecture, civil and mechanical engineering, film, and video gamedesign—and available in a freeware version, SketchUp Make, and a paid version with additional functionality, SketchUp Pro.

    SketchUp is currently owned by Trimble Navigation,[1][4] a mapping, surveying, and navigation equipment company.[5] The program's authors describe it as easy to use.[6] There is an online open source library of free model assemblies (e.g. windows, doors, automobiles), 3D Warehouse, to which users may contribute models. The program includes drawing layout functionality, allows surface rendering in variable "styles", supports third-party "plug-in" programs hosted on a site called Extension Warehouse to provide other capabilities (e.g. near photo-realistic rendering), and enables placement of its models within Google Earth.[7]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SketchUp

    This is different from a CAD App which normally starts with 2D drawings.  With Sketchup, you jump right in and start modeling in 3D and later export to 2D CAD apps as necessary.

    Sketchup is written in C and is available for macOS and Windows.  You can write program extensions in Ruby -- available as a collection from SMustard (think about it).  In addition, there is an online warehouse of thousands of Sketchup models, e.g. cars, buildings, furniture, landscapes, etc.

    https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com



    What is of most interest to me is having Sketchup run on an iPad Pro with Apple Pencil,  with program     extensions written in Swift.


    Sketchup is a terrific little program, save for a few annoyances that always cause my models to do something I wasn't quite expecting. Used it for years and few things beat it for rapid 3-D visualizations.
Sign In or Register to comment.