Warren Buffett grows Berkshire Hathaway AAPL stake to 133 million shares worth $17 billion...

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  • Reply 41 of 52
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,420member
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    edited February 2017
  • Reply 42 of 52
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,113moderator
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    I wasn't attempting to imply anything about your stance regarding Cook's fitness for the job, but moreso trying to head off Sog using your post to justify his.  Sorry that I didn't qualify  it.  I'll be more clear next time.  
  • Reply 43 of 52
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,420member
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    I wasn't attempting to imply anything about your stance regarding Cook's fitness for the job, but moreso trying to head off Sog using your post to justify his.  Sorry that I didn't qualify  it.  I'll be more clear next time.  
    Trust me, I am keeping a very close eye on Sog35.

    If anyone uses my comments out of context, I will ask the forum moderation team that all of that person's comments in this thread be deleted and the thread permanently closed.

    Do not expect an ounce of leniency toward these types of commenters from me. There are handful of others here, no names to be mentioned now.

    Sadly, the discussion quality concerning anything to do with Apple as an investment in decidedly poor. This is not an exclusive problem with AppleInsider, it happens pretty much anywhere where Apple is discussed.

    Some Apple fanboys need to get it in their head that AAPL is not a "perfect" investment. It has its ups and downs just like any other equity and sometimes, investing in some other company will result in a superior ROI. I took advantage of this myself in the last two years.
    edited February 2017 radarthekat
  • Reply 44 of 52
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.


    And where did you put the money you got from selling your Aapl?
  • Reply 45 of 52
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,710member
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    I wasn't attempting to imply anything about your stance regarding Cook's fitness for the job, but moreso trying to head off Sog using your post to justify his.  Sorry that I didn't qualify  it.  I'll be more clear next time.  
    Trust me, I am keeping a very close eye on Sog35.

    If anyone uses my comments out of context, I will ask the forum moderation team that all of that person's comments in this thread be deleted and the thread permanently closed.

    Do not expect an ounce of leniency toward these types of commenters from me. There are handful of others here, no names to be mentioned now.

    Sadly, the discussion quality concerning anything to do with Apple as an investment in decidedly poor. This is not an exclusive problem with AppleInsider, it happens pretty much anywhere where Apple is discussed.

    Some Apple fanboys need to get it in their head that AAPL is not a "perfect" investment. It has its ups and downs just like any other equity and sometimes, investing in some other company will result in a superior ROI. I took advantage of this myself in the last two years.


    No 'Apple Fanboy' said that Apple was the perfect stock. In fact most Apple fans (and haters) don't care one way or the other about the stock price. They are more concerned with what Apple makes or does not make. 

    This argument is not about the worth of Apple stock, it's about how Sog has subjected folk to his tiresome drivel for months and now comes and tries to make it look like he supported Cook all along. It's pathetic.

    What people have said is that Sog does not really have a clue about how to invest. By his own admission he was overexposed  on APPL, and so whines endlessly about it when the price drops. His attempts to justify his comments switch desperately between poor attempts at justification and hoping folk forget he said anything at all. He should grow some stones,  admit he was wrong and learn how to conduct himself when things don't always go his way.

    Anyway, since I added him to my ignore list then I shouldn't really be commenting on it anyway. My mistake. 


     
    radarthekatStrangeDays
  • Reply 46 of 52
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    I wasn't attempting to imply anything about your stance regarding Cook's fitness for the job, but moreso trying to head off Sog using your post to justify his.  Sorry that I didn't qualify  it.  I'll be more clear next time.  
    Trust me, I am keeping a very close eye on Sog35.

    If anyone uses my comments out of context, I will ask the forum moderation team that all of that person's comments in this thread be deleted and the thread permanently closed.

    Do not expect an ounce of leniency toward these types of commenters from me. There are handful of others here, no names to be mentioned now.

    Sadly, the discussion quality concerning anything to do with Apple as an investment in decidedly poor. This is not an exclusive problem with AppleInsider, it happens pretty much anywhere where Apple is discussed.

    Some Apple fanboys need to get it in their head that AAPL is not a "perfect" investment. It has its ups and downs just like any other equity and sometimes, investing in some other company will result in a superior ROI. I took advantage of this myself in the last two years.
    Well, any use of '"fanboy" should disqualify you out of hand...
    It places you on some unwarranted condescending higher plane you haven't earned.

    That investing in some other company will result in a higher ROI depends entirely on when what your baselines are, what's your position, when you got in, got out, options, dividends, whatever.  If the time period when the stock was bought or sold is arbitrary and only chosen to suit the argument, sure it can almost always be true.

    Fundamentals strengths, and weaknesses of Apple have barely changed in the last few years and don't really explain the current stock price and didn't really explain the stock price 5 years ago when Apple's profits were growing fast. It was still undervalued compared to the competition with both a lower growth rate and a lower profit.
    Yet, people were making the same arguments mostly than now justifying Apple's stock price.

    The rational case for Apple's stock, like for most stocks have long since departed
    from the theoretical present value of future earnings according to the expected rated of return AKA: stock price.
    The relationship between the actual market's potential to generate profits that would justify the market's valuation has no basis in logic.

    So, stock price are mostly based on the feels.

     Apple holding its game closer to the vest is more open to wild interpretation of the meager existing data. That's been a common and maybe even warranted criticism. That this lack of transparency in regards to future intent leaves too much room to the imagination of pessimists.
    This way of doing is a legacy of Jobs and is deeply ingrained in Apple's DNA; it has also been the wellspring for the "Apple is doomed" narrative that analysts like to push around.

    In the absence of any real info most of the time, and roiling in the 24h/7day a week news cycle that invents as much news as it reports, it's no surprise that the stock market is now mostly a momentum driven average of the sums of all hopes and fears. The paucity of real info being stark in the case of Apple, sensitivity to 'the feels' is high.

    This entirely fear and emotion based narrative makes it easy for those with large vested interests and a way to influence the narrative (like analysts) to play around with the stock, push it higher, push it lower... Who cares, they're making money coming or goingt
    radarthekatbrucemcStrangeDays
  • Reply 47 of 52
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,242member
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    I'm glad I was right.

    Its hilarious that many people here think AAPL is the only good investment in the stock market.

    The truth is in Tech, Apple has been one of the worst investments the last 2 years.

    People here need to separate their love for Apple products with AAPL.  Owning AAPL is all about making money. If AAPL is not making money and lagging the entire market by a large margin then the CEO needs to be questioned.

    A CEO's true value is what he does during the tough times. Any one can be a good CEO when revenues and profits are growing 30%+ like when the iPhone6 came out. But what about when profits are down like in 2016? IMO, Cook did a very bad job at protecting the stock price last year. It could have been part of a bigger plan to drop the stock price to buyback cheap shares. who knows. All I know is Cook's performance in 2016 was lackluster at best. Thankfully he has had a strong December and 2017
    You still have it wrong -- Apple's priority is to delight its customers, and ensuring profits follow. It is never its priority to manage to the stock price. Read it again:

    The Dumbest Idea In The World: Maximizing Shareholder Value - Forbes

    As long as they continue to delight their customers and kill it in profit, there is no problem, regardless of your portfolio.
  • Reply 48 of 52
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,242member

    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    mpantone said:
    sog35 said:
    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Do you know where he put that money he got from selling Apple? Those investments could have easily out performed Apple.

    Two years ago AAPL was at $129. Today its $137. A 6% return. pitiful.

    Google is up 45% in the same time period
    Facebook up 70%
    Microsoft 52%
    Netflix 113%

    Even the damn Nasdaq at 16% and S&P500 at 14% blew away Apple the last 2 years.
    Sog35 is actually correct.

    Since the start of 2015, AAPL has not been a particularly stellar investment. Only the recent run up has helped, but they still lag the S&P 500 and Nasdaq indexes since that time.

    mpantone said:
    For me, I no longer want to have any single company's stock be more than 6-7% of my portfolio. I sold a bunch of AAPL two years ago, one of the smartest things I've done. 

    More than anything else, Buffett's substantial acquisition of AAPL is a clear indicator that Apple's days as a growth stock are over. It's a value stock in 2017.
    How was divesting smart, considering you've lost wealth from it?
    Quite the contrary, I made far more from NFLX over the past 25 months than I would if I had stayed with AAPL even though my NFLX position is smaller that what I dumped in AAPL.

    I sold much of my AAPL holdings in early February 2015 around $110 per share.

    I also bought NFLX just about two weeks earlier and boy did those shares take off; the ROI on my NFLX holdings is +202%. And yes, I also added some more to my SPY and QQQ holdings at the time I sold AAPL in February 2015.

    Let's say you sold $12K in AAPL in early 2015 and invested $4K in NFLX and $8K in SPY. Today the NFLX would be worth $12K and the SPY would be worth $9120. Your net gain would be $9120 ($8000 + $1120). If you kept all $12K in AAPL, you'd have $12,720, a net gain of $720 (not including AAPL's dividend payout, maybe $450). If you had put the entire $12K in NFLX, it would be worth $36K today.

    I wish I had also purchased some AMZN at the time, but of the four FANG stocks, NFLX has performed the best since January 1st, 2015, even outperforming AMZN.

    I still have some AAPL shares. Most likely I will not sell these, but I will end up donating occasionally to charity when I need to offset capital gains, something I expect I will need to do this year.
    None of this has anything to do with Sog's previous contention that Cook should have been fired, except to those who believe CEOs should manage to the stock price.  
    Read the quotes above carefully by clicking on the "Show previous quotes" hyperlink: I was not addressing Tim Cook's fitness to remain as Apple CEO nor do I care to do so at this time.
     
    In the first part of my reply, I was merely responding to Sog35's comment that AAPL only gained 6% since early 2015 and that there were other investments that have performed far better since then. In this regard, Sog35 is correct. Sog35 actually happened to guess correctly one of the stocks that I had indeed put some of my proceeds into.

    In the second and longer part of my reply I followed up by responding to StrangeDays who claimed that I had "lost wealth" [sic] by selling AAPL in early 2015.

    I am happy I sold the bulk of my AAPL holdings in early 2015 and put the proceeds to better use. I am still happy to be an AAPL shareholder, I believe those shares are going to save my butt re: capital gains taxes for several years to come.

    I answered the two comments sequentially.

    As for the argument that Tim Cook should be fired for inability to increase shareholder value, I will leave that discussion for another day.

    No commenter is required to answer all of the various discussion topics that come up in a thread. I chose not to address Tim Cook's performance as CEO. I did address the comments that I quoted. That's how the forum quoting system is intended for.
    I wasn't attempting to imply anything about your stance regarding Cook's fitness for the job, but moreso trying to head off Sog using your post to justify his.  Sorry that I didn't qualify  it.  I'll be more clear next time.  

    If anyone uses my comments out of context, I will ask the forum moderation team that all of that person's comments in this thread be deleted and the thread permanently closed.

    Do not expect an ounce of leniency toward these types of commenters from me.
    Good luck with that.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 49 of 52
    carnegiecarnegie Posts: 726member
    For those interested in Mr. Buffett's thoughts on Apple, here are his latest public comments about Apple.

    CNBC Video

    Basically... not concerned with results in the short term, people are probably waiting for the anticipated new iPhone model; loves that Apple is buying back sales. 
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 50 of 52
    carnegiecarnegie Posts: 726member
    According to the 13F that was just filed by Berkshire Hathaway, as of the end of March it owned 129,357,106 shares of AAPL. That's a little less than we expected based on previous statements by Mr. Buffett. Sometimes equity holdings are reported by a different institutional manager. I'll check to see if I can figure out whether that's the case here.


    EDIT: New England Financial Management Inc. reports holding 5,598,000 shares of AAPL (as shared-defined) as of the end of March and its Form 13F lists Berkshire Hathaway Inc. as an included manager. So I suspect those 5 million plus shares are, in effect, Berkshire's. That would bring Berkshire's AAPL holdings (if they haven't changed) to almost 135 million shares worth about $21 billion as of the close today. 
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 51 of 52
    nhtnht Posts: 4,491member
    Warren Buffet on investing for most folks:
    "My money, I should add, is where my mouth is: What I advise here is essentially identical to certain instructions I’ve laid out in my will. One bequest provides that cash will be delivered to a trustee for my wife’s benefit. (I have to use cash for individual bequests, because all of my Berkshire shares will be fully distributed to certain philanthropic organizations over the ten years following the closing of my estate.) My advice to the trustee could not be more simple: Put 10% of the cash in short-term government bonds and 90% in a very low-cost S&P 500 index fund. (I suggest Vanguard’s.) I believe the trust’s long-term results from this policy will be superior to those attained by most investors – whether pension funds, institutions or individuals – who employ high-fee managers. "

    http://www.berkshirehathaway.com/letters/2013ltr.pdf

    Page 20.

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