Original iPhone, 3G, 3GS still in active use, 2016 web traffic report reveals

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Older iPhones are still in use despite their age, according to a report on mobile Internet usage, with the original iPhone 3G, and 3GS all highlighted in traffic monitoring research for 2016 that compares the use of Apple devices against other manufacturers in the smartphone market.




The research from analytics firm DeviceAtlas, based on web usage data derived from User Agent strings, found web traffic from Samsung devices "grew significantly" in the fourth quarter of 2016, increasing in a number of major markets by over 2 percent, including the United States at 2.3 percent, and Italy with a 2.7 percent rise.

In the quarter, Samsung declared it had the best fourth quarter performance for the last three years, with sales of other smartphones helping counteract the bad publicity caused by the Note 7 recall fiasco. A Gartner report earlier this month was more pessimistic on the effects of the recall, with shipment estimates for the quarter down 2.9 percent year-on-year.

For the same quarter, the share of web traffic attributed to Apple devices dropped in many markets, including 5 percent in Italy and 3.6 percent in the U.S. Despite the reductions of usage in most markets, Apple's web traffic share did increase in a few, with Japan up 2.2 percent, South Africa up 2 percent, and up 1.7 percent in Canada.

When analyzing graphs for 20 countries selected for the comparison, it is still apparent that Apple is a major force in a number of markets. In Australia, Canada, Japan, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the U.S., Apple continues to be a source for a greater amount of web traffic compared to Samsung smartphones

When comparing Android against iOS, Android continues to have a higher market share overall. The data reveals there are 42 countries out of 56 where Android devices generate more web traffic, while iOS traffic is higher in 14 countries.

It is noted that countries with a preference for using iPhones to go online over Android are highly-developed regions, with Japan and Denmark heading up the list, followed by countries including the UK. Canada, Australia, and the United States. On the other end of the scale, Android is seen to be extremely popular in markets with a generally weaker economy, where Android smartphones are bought due to their lower cost.




Older models of the iPhone are still being used in a number of areas, with the report noting their long lifespan and high resale value making them "a better investment than most Android phones." The iPhone 4 and iPhone 4s still has over 3.5 percent of the mobile web traffic share in Russia, with over 2 percent in France and Japan.

The original iPhone, as well as the 3G and 3GS, are still in use in some countries, making up close to 1 percent of mobile web traffic in Sweden, and has a share of around 0.5 percent in France, Japan, Brazil, Germany, and Italy. The iPod Touch is still holding a 0.5 percent share in Canada, with lower percentages detected in Australia, the United Kingdom, and Japan.



DeviceAtlas also examined the popularity of iPhones with a 4-inch screen for web browsing compared to the other sizes of iPhone, in a small number of markets in the last quarter. In some areas, it is noted that web traffic from 4-inch iPhones is close to the popularity of 4.7-inch iPhones, and is the most popular in Russia.

It is noted that web traffic for 5.5-inch Plus models of iPhones is significantly lower than the other two display sizes in many cases. DeviceAtlas suggests that pricing may be more of an important factor than user preferences in this case, due to the high price of plus models compared to the 4-inch versions.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,682member
    Old apple product just do not die, we have a 3G and 3GS as well as a 4 still laying around the house and from time to time I turn them on and they still work fine. Image that, can not say the same for my older android Motorola phone I also have laying about, they barely turn on and die quickly without a charger plugged in.
    edited February 2017 brakkenjahbladewatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 17
    anomeanome Posts: 1,304member

    The only one of my iPhones not still technically working is the iPhone 5 which fell apart due to a swollen battery.

    The problem is that a lot of apps just stopped working on the older versions of iOS.

    chia
  • Reply 3 of 17
    This is what Wall Street really dislikes about Apple. Apple products actually do last a long and useful lifespan. Wall Street prefers companies who make quickly disposable products that constantly need to be replaced. Yeah, sure, an iPhone or iPad replacement cycle is longer and so they start yelling, "No one is buying Apple products anymore. " Of course, Wall Street doesn't give a damn about the ecology. All they want to hear about is Apple being able to sell 200 million iPhones every year. No company needs to sell that many smartphones every year to be considered valuable nor should there be customers having to buy that many every year. So, iPhone growth stagnates because people are holding on to a useful older product and Wall Street says to hell with that. They say it's the iPhone's lack of innovation that's Apple's biggest problem. Such stupidity. Is it that companies shouldn't build products to last?

    Even as an Apple shareholder, I believe people should hold on to a useful older product if it still works for them. An iPhone should have a useful life of at least two years. Obviously iPads last longer because they're not used as much. How is that a bad thing? Only greedy investors would think that a long-lasting product is a bad thing for a company to make. All I know is the longer a product can be used, the consumer is getting back more from the cost of purchase. Wall Street only looks at initial cost and nothing else matters.

    It's claimed any Android smartphone is just as good as an iPhone but if they're not getting OS upgrades then maybe that could be a problem to users. I can't generalize about the build quality of Android smartphones as some are probably better than others. I just think Apple protects their customers better than most other companies do and that's probably one of the reasons for the higher cost of Apple products. How well does Xiaomi or Huawei support their customers once they're bought the product? Wall Street is never concerned about after-market support because only new sales matters to them. A company needs to support older products to build customer loyalty.  I think Apple's retail stores go a long way to provide that customer service but Wall Street never even considers Apple's brick-and-mortar business as being valuable.

    Stop listening to analysts and pundits about people not buying iPhones due to lack of innovation.  Believe that smart consumers hold on to well-working products for a longer time if they can.  Most consumers don't really want to buy some new product every year because it's got a few more features no matter what those tech-heads say.  If a consumer is comfortable using an older product, why should they go through the hassle to replace it.
    edited February 2017 king editor the gratechiajahbladejony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 17
    Apple products just keep on going. I just sold my 2010 MBP for almost $400. A 7 yr old laptop. Who expects to get 20% of the cost of the laptop back in 7 yrs (I paid $1,800 for it new).
    edited February 2017 jahbladewatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 17
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,027member
    How many old samsung or other manufacturers phones still around ? Apple has sticky products and people know, why ? Reliable,dependable and long lasting.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 17
    I still have my 4, it is still functional except for the talking on the ph aspect. I dropped it in 2013, and the chip that controls the voice got dislodged and people couldn't hear me speak, but I could hear them. Apparently this was a notorious issue with the 4S as well, from what i was told. The chip wasn't soldered onto the motherboard. So I now just use it as a music player. My 2012 MBP is still going strong after I put in a new SSD in it. Runs like a new machine! If you haven't put in a SSD in your old HDD Mac, you should. it's worth the investment.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 17
    Cue hisses and boos.

    I am running a mid 2010 17 inch MBP with 8GB and an SSD.  Runs MacOS Sierra a treat.  Doesn't choke on MS-Project or Visio in a Windows 7 VM under Parallels.
    Works good, looks good, feels good.  Here's to the crazy ones.

    And here's to Apple for making fine, usable, robust hardware and software.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 17
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    I hate graphs like this where the scale is different for the two comparisons. For example in the most recent quarter for USA it may look like iOS is a lot more but it is actually at most only a couple percentiles ahead of Android.
  • Reply 9 of 17
    This is what Wall Street really dislikes about Apple. Apple products actually do last a long and useful lifespan. Wall Street prefers companies who make quickly disposable products that constantly need to be replaced. Yeah, sure, an iPhone or iPad replacement cycle is longer and so they start yelling, "No one is buying Apple products anymore. " Of course, Wall Street doesn't give a damn about the ecology. All they want to hear about is Apple being able to sell 200 million iPhones every year. No company needs to sell that many smartphones every year to be considered valuable nor should there be customers having to buy that many every year. So, iPhone growth stagnates because people are holding on to a useful older product and Wall Street says to hell with that. They say it's the iPhone's lack of innovation that's Apple's biggest problem. Such stupidity. Is it that companies shouldn't build products to last?

    Even as an Apple shareholder, I believe people should hold on to a useful older product if it still works for them. An iPhone should have a useful life of at least two years. Obviously iPads last longer because they're not used as much. How is that a bad thing? Only greedy investors would think that a long-lasting product is a bad thing for a company to make. All I know is the longer a product can be used, the consumer is getting back more from the cost of purchase. Wall Street only looks at initial cost and nothing else matters.

    It's claimed any Android smartphone is just as good as an iPhone but if they're not getting OS upgrades then maybe that could be a problem to users. I can't generalize about the build quality of Android smartphones as some are probably better than others. I just think Apple protects their customers better than most other companies do and that's probably one of the reasons for the higher cost of Apple products. How well does Xiaomi or Huawei support their customers once they're bought the product? Wall Street is never concerned about after-market support because only new sales matters to them. A company needs to support older products to build customer loyalty.  I think Apple's retail stores go a long way to provide that customer service but Wall Street never even considers Apple's brick-and-mortar business as being valuable.

    Stop listening to analysts and pundits about people not buying iPhones due to lack of innovation.  Believe that smart consumers hold on to well-working products for a longer time if they can.  Most consumers don't really want to buy some new product every year because it's got a few more features no matter what those tech-heads say.  If a consumer is comfortable using an older product, why should they go through the hassle to replace it.

    it is called plan obsolescence. The car companies got good at this back in the 60's and 70's to the point that their cars barely lasted 3 years and the Japanese car companies almost put them out of business. Microsoft and Intel got really good at this, MS engineer wrote bloatware which killed performance so you had to upgrade your computer every few years, Intel keep coming new processors to allow MS to updating software to make old process look slow. MS and Intel sold computers several times over to the same people over time. Today because of cell phone people are not upgrading their PC so Intel is not selling too many processor over and over again.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 17
    dr. xdr. x Posts: 191member
    I still have my iPhone 6 which I purchased back in 2014 and it works fine. I have a Mid 2012 13" MacBook Pro which I upgraded the drive to an SSD two years ago and it runs great. Planed obsolescence is not the way to go. Make products that last and make them recyclable when the person decided to upgrade or get a new product.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 17
    ksecksec Posts: 1,567member
    I really wish they could do a hardware update on iPhone 3GS. More Modern Tech. It will be a lovely little phone for secondary uses. Like if you have two sim card one for work and one for phone. Actually between 3GS and 4G, I would like a thinner 4G.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    YvLyYvLy Posts: 82member
    Dr. X, you STILL have your iPhone 6 ... BACK from 2014??? How old are you? ;-)
  • Reply 13 of 17
    schlack said:
    Apple products just keep on going. I just sold my 2010 MBP for almost $400. A 7 yr old laptop. Who expects to get 20% of the cost of the laptop back in 7 yrs (I paid $1,800 for it new).
    I sold an old iMac G5 for £200 2 years ago, it cost me circa £1300 new in the year before they moved to intel. Conversely, our 18month old lenovo windows 10 laptop with touchy-screen etc. doesnt last half an hour on the battery already and is unbearable slow and crashes. You get what you pay for really.
  • Reply 14 of 17
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,788member
    Typing this on an Apple Macbook from 2008. I'm upgrading, but only because it's starting to get a bit slow for technical stuff.

    But I thought Apple made stuff to break six minutes after the warranty expires.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,788member
    Apple's share of web traffic may be shrinking, which is not good news, but that does not mean the platform isn't growing. It's just not growing fast as fast as the competition.

    I am more concerned with web traffic share than sales share. This is a better indicator of the health of the ecosystem.
    edited February 2017
  • Reply 16 of 17
    Rayz2016 said:
    Apple's share of web traffic may be shrinking, which is not good news, but that does not mean the platform isn't growing. It's just not growing fast as fast as the competition.

    I am more concerned with web traffic share than sales share. This is a better indicator of the health of the ecosystem.
    Actually, it's not that clear what that means, Apple has a market share around 12-15% in many of those countries and had a lot more downloads than its market share.
    Meaning Apple users used to full capacity of their phones.
    This, only means that Android Web usage is catching up with its market share as the average Android phone gets better and better and more useful to its owner.
    Their usage pattern is catching up with the IOS usage pattern.

    Knowing that Android is used on a hell of a lot of non phone (or even tablet) devices kinda confuses things even more.
  • Reply 17 of 17
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    maestro64 said:
    Old apple product just do not die, we have a 3G and 3GS as well as a 4 still laying around the house and from time to time I turn them on and they still work fine. Image that, can not say the same for my older android Motorola phone I also have laying about, they barely turn on and die quickly without a charger plugged in.
    Well they (iphones) will die eventually due to the battery, but I no doubt expect them to be functionally usable for a while, unfortunately the software may not.
     
    Like you wouldn't want to use them online, but they're still usable for music and video.
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