Asthma study using Apple's ResearchKit proven accurate when compared to existing research

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in iPhone
A study reports ResearchKit is an extremely effective way to conduct medical research, with patient data collected from asthma sufferers via Apple's framework found to correlate with the results of similar studies using established data collection methods.




Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai analyzed data from the Asthma Mobile Health Study, a program launched in March 2015 at the same time as Apple introduced ResearchKit itself. Unlike others, this study relied on just a specially-created iPhone app called Asthma Health, co-developed with LifeMap Solutions, which provided users with regular surveys concerning their health.

The app was downloaded almost 50,000 times in the first six months since its launch, according to results published in journal Nature Biotechnology. Of these downloads, a total of 7,593 people completed the electronic informed consent process, allowing data to be collected and analyzed by the researchers.

Out of the people completing the enrollment process, approximately 85 percent of users completed at least one survey offered by the app, which is a promising start. Ultimately, only 2,317 users from the enrolled pool filled out multiple surveys throughout the six-month study, but this was still a sufficient enough sample size for analysis.




The data was compared to the results of other asthma patient studies, with researchers noting common metrics between the sets of results, such as peak flow. Scientists were also able to correlate data from patients with external factors, including air quality, which also appeared to match existing studies.

Changes to the level of pollen and heat could also be corroborated in the study, when taking into account the user's location and other device data. For example, researchers were able to correlate increased daily asthma symptoms in Washington State with a wildfire outbreak, with the two occurring at similar times.

Yvonne Chan, Director of Digital Health and Personalized Medicine for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai advises the use of iPhones and ResearchKit is "particularly suitable for studies of short duration that require rapid enrollment across diverse geographical locations, frequent data collection, and real-time feedback to participants."

"Our study demonstrates the power of mobile health tools to scale and accelerate clinical research so that we can derive the evidence needed to inform clinical practice and improve patient care."

Eric Schadt, Professor of Genomics at the Icahn School of Medicine and Founding Director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology claims "We now have the ability to capture rich research data from thousands of individuals to better characterize 'real world' patterns of disease, wellness, and behavior. This approach provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of our patients that was not feasible in the past due to logistical limitations and prohibitive costs."

The study's results are likely to bolster ResearchKit's credibility as a framework for medical research, one that is already being used in a number of different projects. One recent study used the Apple Watch and ResearchKit to analyze seizure triggers in epilepsy sufferers, recording biometric data and prompting users to respond for reflex and awareness testing during each seizure event.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    Asthma is repressed grief. People who work with the dying and their facility have known this for years. Deal with the grief and the asthma simply disappears. Human body evolved to heal itself, if only you let it. Peace out, Ireland.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 2 of 21
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,991member
    I think what this demonstrates is that the majority of people are lazy, not willing to spend any time to manually enter information (except when they're using something more important like Facebook /s). The problem with studying asthma is that there isn't an automagic way of interpreting a person's reaction to external stimuli. I wish there was a way to capture asthma attacks, including what caused them. One way to get more people involved might be to talk about these products more often. I seem to remember reading about it but when I searched my iPhone, I didn't download the app, and when I search the App Store, Asthma Health, (using this term) is nowhere to be found. Clicking on the Asthma Health link above takes you to an AI article from May 2015 where only one person commented (@Ericthehalfbee). This is unfortunate and shows the general lack of self health care, especially by Americans. It's a lot easier to simply go to the ER and let someone else treat you.

    (This is not a political statement and I'm not trying to make it one, I'm simply stating my opinion about the way too many people view health care.)
  • Reply 3 of 21
    ireland said:
    Asthma is repressed grief. People who work with the dying and their facility have known this for years. Deal with the grief and the asthma simply disappears. Human body evolved to heal itself, if only you let it. Peace out, Ireland.
    Uh... what? I know plenty of people with asthma and none of them is dealing with grief.
  • Reply 4 of 21
    rob53 said:
    I think what this demonstrates is that the majority of people are lazy, not willing to spend any time to manually enter information (except when they're using something more important like Facebook /s). The problem with studying asthma is that there isn't an automagic way of interpreting a person's reaction to external stimuli. I wish there was a way to capture asthma attacks, including what caused them. One way to get more people involved might be to talk about these products more often. I seem to remember reading about it but when I searched my iPhone, I didn't download the app, and when I search the App Store, Asthma Health, (using this term) is nowhere to be found. Clicking on the Asthma Health link above takes you to an AI article from May 2015 where only one person commented (@Ericthehalfbee). This is unfortunate and shows the general lack of self health care, especially by Americans. It's a lot easier to simply go to the ER and let someone else treat you.

    (This is not a political statement and I'm not trying to make it one, I'm simply stating my opinion about the way too many people view health care.)
    On the glass-half-full side, over 2000 people were willing to take time to enter data into an app regularly for 6 months for a research study that offered no financial compensation or direct benefit for the user. Yay, research volunteers. I bet that people would be much more willing to track their data if it were part of a treatment plan coordinated by their personal physician.
    Soli
  • Reply 5 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 6 of 21
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,891member
    Interesting:  I looked for this study in the App store and could not find it.

    I think Apple could and should do more to promote and support use of its Research Kit more heavily.   Today, 80% of our health care spending (spending that is bankrupting this nation) is spent on chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, dementias and cancers that are primarily lifestyle induced diseases.   Diseases that would be drastically reduced by healthy lifestyles (diet, exercise, stress reduction, etc).

    Particularly with the addition of the Apple Watch, these lifestyle factors could be measured and researched into how we as a nation could best impact these diseases...   The IPhone with the Apple Watch are ideally suited to measure and record lifestyle factors directly, immediately and in real time.   Nothing else in the history of medicine has had this ability.

    I sincerely hope that Apple will promote and support increased research into the effect that lifestyle factors have on our epidemic of chronic diseases....
  • Reply 7 of 21
    jSnivelyjSnively Posts: 327administrator
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    Honestly thought it was a troll post. You signed it "Peace out - Ireland" and it was a ridiculous post. If that's something you truly believe then you are either willfully ignorant on the subject, or you are so limited by whatever 'experience' you have on the matter that you can't see the forest for the trees. Honestly, I more removed it to stop the other posters from calling you out personally (I took two of those along with the OP). But OK, sure, I can bring it back.
    ireland
  • Reply 8 of 21
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    You're not doing yourself any favors by trying to throw out a straw man argument based on a technicality (i.e. the null hypothesis). Asthma is an inflammatory disorder. It is triggered by allergens. It improves with to immune suppressing medication. It is not a response to grief ffs. I'm a psychiatrist that specializes in issues related to trauma. I know plenty about asthma, and plenty about grief.

    *Not saying your post should be (should've been) deleted though.

    Jsnively: Do you consider this calling him out personally? Honestly asking to gauge what the boundaries are. Also, just a casual observation, it seems like the forums are being slightly over-moderated. However, they are SO MUCH BETTER than before. I MUCH prefer over to under-moderated (especially when it comes to politically charged topics). So thank you.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 9 of 21
    jSnivelyjSnively Posts: 327administrator
    [...]
    Jsnively: Do you consider this calling him out personally? Honestly asking to gauge what the boundaries are. Also, just a casual observation, it seems like the forums are being slightly over-moderated. However, they are SO MUCH BETTER than before. I MUCH prefer over to under-moderated (especially when it comes to politically charged topics). So thank you.
    No, not at all. Your post is perfectly fine. It's more when people start calling each other names (or that's the slope we're careening towards) that kind of thing we tend to step in. In this case one of the posts in question was actually flagged by a user, and I happened to agree. Live and learn I guess. I did restore everything. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    We've let up on the moderation a lot. There were a few months where i was reading literally every single post that went up here, but that just lead to me spending way too much time on the forums and not getting other stuff done. Plus that way leads madness -- it was not good for my mental health. These days we (mostly) only act on reports, with a few exceptions. I always check-in a few times a day just to make sure nothing has gotten too out of control.
    edited March 2017 patchythepirateirelandSpamSandwich
  • Reply 10 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    ireland said:
    Asthma is repressed grief. People who work with the dying and their facility have known this for years. Deal with the grief and the asthma simply disappears. Human body evolved to heal itself, if only you let it. Peace out, Ireland.
    Uh... what? I know plenty of people with asthma and none of them is dealing with grief.
    You answered your own question without realising it.
  • Reply 11 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    jSnively said:
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    Honestly thought it was a troll post. You signed it "Peace out - Ireland" and it was a ridiculous post. If that's something you truly believe then you are either willfully ignorant on the subject, or you are so limited by whatever 'experience' you have on the matter that you can't see the forest for the trees. Honestly, I more removed it to stop the other posters from calling you out personally (I took two of those along with the OP). But OK, sure, I can bring it back.
    An opinion.
  • Reply 12 of 21
    anomeanome Posts: 1,243member
    ireland said:
    ireland said:
    Asthma is repressed grief. People who work with the dying and their facility have known this for years. Deal with the grief and the asthma simply disappears. Human body evolved to heal itself, if only you let it. Peace out, Ireland.
    Uh... what? I know plenty of people with asthma and none of them is dealing with grief.
    You answered your own question without realising it.

    Just a question. Are you proposing that a five year old child with asthma must have some kind of grief? Because that isn't my experience.

    I've also not met any adults who have been grieving who suddenly developed asthma.

  • Reply 13 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    You're not doing yourself any favors by trying to throw out a straw man argument based on a technicality (i.e. the null hypothesis). Asthma is an inflammatory disorder. It is triggered by allergens. It improves with to immune suppressing medication. It is not a response to grief ffs. I'm a psychiatrist that specializes in issues related to trauma. I know plenty about asthma, and plenty about grief.

    *Not saying your post should be (should've been) deleted though.
    Sorry for taking this long to get back to you @patchythepirate ;

    I don't have time to do all your research for you, but because you never heard of something doesn't make you always right. There are many studies and books on this subject. A quick 5-second Google showed me this link where the best answer will point you the way: http://www.healthcaremagic.com/premiumquestions/Does-unresolved-grief-lead-to-asthma/80513

    I've been researching this and similar issues like this myself for around 4 years. Hope you have a good rest of your day. Always be open to new information, it'll make you a far better 
    psychiatrist. I saw a psychiatrist for around 8 years and he seems more open than the tone of your comment suggests. I wish you the best in your continuing practice. Best wishes.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 14 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    anome said:
    ireland said:
    ireland said:
    Asthma is repressed grief. People who work with the dying and their facility have known this for years. Deal with the grief and the asthma simply disappears. Human body evolved to heal itself, if only you let it. Peace out, Ireland.
    Uh... what? I know plenty of people with asthma and none of them is dealing with grief.
    You answered your own question without realising it.

    Just a question. Are you proposing that a five year old child with asthma must have some kind of grief? Because that isn't my experience.

    I've also not met any adults who have been grieving who suddenly developed asthma.

    Yes, that's the point. Something in their past they are not grieving about. The unconscious doesn't understand time like our conscious mind perceives it. It's surpressed out of their obvious awareness.

    As for the child, complications at birth and a million other scenarios are possible. There are many books on this subject matter and many papers. Just look into it. The evidence is plenty. And like my original example, people who work with the families of death and dying understand this plainly and talk about it.

    It's simple. The emotions are trying not to come out, hence the wheezing. Our acting teachers used often mention this. Hence why acting classes often have specialised classes for tension and why actors often need therapy as they reach blocks and regular folk don't even go there. The body evolved over millions of years and self-heals, asthma medication was invented a few decades ago.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 15 of 21
    nhtnht Posts: 4,402member
    This is one of the dumber threads on AI showing a complete rejection of science and common sense.

    The original post most certainly should have been deleted under the category of "this makes AI look stupid on the front page" and completely derailed any possible discussion on the values of researchkit due to its ridiculous attack on the asthma research because "asthma is caused by grief" by a science denier.  
  • Reply 16 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    nht said:
    This is one of the dumber threads on AI showing a complete rejection of science and common sense.

    The original post most certainly should have been deleted under the category of "this makes AI look stupid on the front page" and completely derailed any possible discussion on the values of researchkit due to its ridiculous attack on the asthma research because "asthma is caused by grief" by a science denier.
    Try again.
  • Reply 17 of 21
    ireland said:
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    You're not doing yourself any favors by trying to throw out a straw man argument based on a technicality (i.e. the null hypothesis). Asthma is an inflammatory disorder. It is triggered by allergens. It improves with to immune suppressing medication. It is not a response to grief ffs. I'm a psychiatrist that specializes in issues related to trauma. I know plenty about asthma, and plenty about grief.

    *Not saying your post should be (should've been) deleted though.
    Sorry for taking this long to get back to you @patchythepirate ;

    I don't have time to do all your research for you, but because you never heard of something doesn't make you always right. There are many studies and books on this subject. A quick 5-second Google showed me this link where the best answer will point you the way: http://www.healthcaremagic.com/premiumquestions/Does-unresolved-grief-lead-to-asthma/80513

    I've been researching this and similar issues like this myself for around 4 years. Hope you have a good rest of your day. Always be open to new information, it'll make you a far better 
    psychiatrist. I saw a psychiatrist for around 8 years and he seems more open than the tone of your comment suggests. I wish you the best in your continuing practice. Best wishes.
    @ireland No worries on the timing. I'm sorry to say (I say this genuinely), but the link you provided does absolutely nothing to prove your point. I have even worked with military, including Vietnam veterans, and there is still no reason for me to believe that there is any significant association between grief and asthma. They are totally different. Of course, breathing itself can be a significant indicator of psychological distress, and talking about breathing is something I do very regularly in my practice.

    FWIW, the best treatment for trauma/grief is talk therapy, primarily Supportive, TF-CBT (trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy), and for some, Psychodynamic Psychotherapy). Medications can be helpful sometimes, particularly if given shortly after the trauma/loss, or if further complications develop, like depression, or anxiety.

    For adolescents or older, I HIGHLY recommend yoga. You do not have to be flexible or athletic to benefit. The primary benefit comes from the intent and practice.

    I practice yoga myself as well.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 422member
    jSnively said:
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    Honestly thought it was a troll post. You signed it "Peace out - Ireland" and it was a ridiculous post. If that's something you truly believe then you are either willfully ignorant on the subject, or you are so limited by whatever 'experience' you have on the matter that you can't see the forest for the trees. Honestly, I more removed it to stop the other posters from calling you out personally (I took two of those along with the OP). But OK, sure, I can bring it back.
    Thanks for doing this, otherwise I couldn't have rolled my eyes and followed that up with an "oh brother...one of those guys".
  • Reply 19 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    igorsky said:
    jSnively said:
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    Honestly thought it was a troll post. You signed it "Peace out - Ireland" and it was a ridiculous post. If that's something you truly believe then you are either willfully ignorant on the subject, or you are so limited by whatever 'experience' you have on the matter that you can't see the forest for the trees. Honestly, I more removed it to stop the other posters from calling you out personally (I took two of those along with the OP). But OK, sure, I can bring it back.
    Thanks for doing this, otherwise I couldn't have rolled my eyes and followed that up with an "oh brother...one of those guys".
    That's not an argument. It's just a bunch of words you tell yourself. Why bother discussing it when it's obvious you are unable.
  • Reply 20 of 21
    irelandireland Posts: 17,547member
    ireland said:
    ireland said:
    Can't believe you guys deleted my asthma grief post. I've lots of experience about this. Nothing can be 'proven' in science so I won't be able to convince you, but it was totally relative and interesting to readers in my personal opinion. The least I could be given after 16,000 posts around here is a pinch of benefit of the doubt, even allowing others go disagree amicably. Or allowing the invitation to research the matter themselves. The human race cannot change otherwise. Wishing you all a pleasant year. Much respect.
    You're not doing yourself any favors by trying to throw out a straw man argument based on a technicality (i.e. the null hypothesis). Asthma is an inflammatory disorder. It is triggered by allergens. It improves with to immune suppressing medication. It is not a response to grief ffs. I'm a psychiatrist that specializes in issues related to trauma. I know plenty about asthma, and plenty about grief.

    *Not saying your post should be (should've been) deleted though.
    Sorry for taking this long to get back to you @patchythepirate ;

    I don't have time to do all your research for you, but because you never heard of something doesn't make you always right. There are many studies and books on this subject. A quick 5-second Google showed me this link where the best answer will point you the way: http://www.healthcaremagic.com/premiumquestions/Does-unresolved-grief-lead-to-asthma/80513

    I've been researching this and similar issues like this myself for around 4 years. Hope you have a good rest of your day. Always be open to new information, it'll make you a far better psychiatrist. I saw a psychiatrist for around 8 years and he seems more open than the tone of your comment suggests. I wish you the best in your continuing practice. Best wishes.
    @ireland No worries on the timing. I'm sorry to say (I say this genuinely), but the link you provided does absolutely nothing to prove your point.
    No need to be sorry. You have your views.
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