Rare functional Apple-1 hits auction block in May with $320,000 estimated price

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in General Discussion
A vintage Apple-1 computer is going on sale via auction in May, with the rare computer and an archive of documents, including the manual and notes of phone calls with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, estimated to sell for up to $320,000.




German auction house Team Breker, which specializes in technical antiques, notes the Apple-1 is being sold by its original owner, an unidentified computer engineer from Berkeley, California. Said to be the "best-preserved example of an Apple-1 computer to have appeared on the market," The Telegraph reports it to be in full working condition, and is believed to be one of only eight remaining working units left in existence.

A spokesperson for the auctioneer advises it is 14th on Mike Willegal's Apple-1 registry, with serial number 01-0073, and also bears the original NTI sign.

The documents accompanying the Apple-1 include the original manual, complete with the primary logo, circuit diagrams, and a receipt for the motherboard and cassette interface. An original letter from Apple customer care is also provided, advising the customer could not upgrade to the Apple-II.

Aside from original documentation, the paperwork also includes a collection of notes from telephone calls with Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1977.

Going on sale in Cologne, Germany on May 20, the Apple-1 is estimated to sell for between $190,000 and $320,000. Given previous auctions for the Apple-1, and the state of preservation, it is likely the final price will be far higher.

Last year, a "Celebration" motherboard believed to be one of the first hand-built prototypes for the Apple-1 sold for $815,000. In 2014, a working Apple-1 was auctioned for $365,000, falling short of estimates between $400,000 and $600,000, while a 2013 auction for an Apple-1 signed by Steve Wozniak fetched $671,000.

The current record for the highest price paid at auction for an Apple-1 is $905,000, acquired by The Henry Ford organization in late 2014.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member
    OK, I've got the $20k.  Who wants to loan me the other $300,000? :)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 12
    I have just enough Apple stock.....
    aaronjwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 12
    Surely the inset photo of a circuit board reading "Apple Computer 1" is an advertising prop, yes?  Nobody names their first product "version 1".  Just like nobody names thier child "senior".
  • Reply 4 of 12
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,298member
    Surely the inset photo of a circuit board reading "Apple Computer 1" is an advertising prop, yes?  Nobody names their first product "version 1".  Just like nobody names thier child "senior".
    Looks real to me.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    kamiltonkamilton Posts: 257member
    I have a first gen Dell I'll sell!  Starting bid....  $1


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 12
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,457member
    Surely the inset photo of a circuit board reading "Apple Computer 1" is an advertising prop, yes?  Nobody names their first product "version 1".  Just like nobody names thier child "senior".
    Microsoft named the Xbox One.  Numbers have never been their strongest suit.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,168member
    How much would a TRS-80 go for?
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 8 of 12
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,638member
    Just useless junk. I have no idea why people get sentimental over this stuff.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,459member
    volcan said:
    Just useless junk. I have no idea why people get sentimental over this stuff.
    Yah, history, who needs it . . . 

    /s
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 12
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,638member
    flaneur said:
    volcan said:
    Just useless junk. I have no idea why people get sentimental over this stuff.
    Yah, history, who needs it . . . 

    /s
    I know you have a degree in history and I resoect that but I want offer a small history lesson of my own.
     
    Some history matters others not. I have a friend who's father, a history professor in China, was executed for his opposition to the communists. The next day the soldiers came to their house demanding payment for the  bullet used to kill him. My friend has the receipt. That is a historical item. A crude circuit board not so much, at least in my opinion. There is already an Apple 1 in the Smithsonian. Purchasing another one  for a personal collection is just selfishness by someone who should be donating money to better causes.

    Sorry my iPhone battery died before I could finish this post. Back to the story, my friend, also a  professor of physics , wrote a book about the Japanese invasion of China, the internment of people, treading though through the mountains in winter barefoot, then the rise of communism, executions of achedemics, confiscation of property. 

    I have the first copy of that book because I am the publisher. There are only fifty copies. It is hard bound right to left vertical in Chinese so I can't read it. It is more than two hundred pages documenting all of history with hundreds of photos but the information is so infalmitory and contoversisl that it cannot be published online because his life would be in jeopardy. That is history baby.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 11 of 12
    volcan said:

    Some history matters others not. I have a friend who's father, a history professor in China, was executed for his opposition to the communists. The next day the soldiers came to their house demanding payment for the  bullet used to kill him. My friend has the receipt.
    That is really f'd up.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Surely the inset photo of a circuit board reading "Apple Computer 1" is an advertising prop, yes?  Nobody names their first product "version 1".  Just like nobody names thier child "senior".
    Except that in this case, the product was called the Apple-1.

    It makes perfect sense to me.  They had started a new company to sell computers.  They expected the company to grow, therefore they called their first product... 1.

    There are plenty of other examples.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Model_1
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Model_A_(1903–04) (ok, "A" instead of "1" but same logic)

    Ok, 2 is hardly "plenty" but I'm sure there are other examples...


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