New photo of Apple's iPhone repair and calibration machine surfaces online

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 26
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 599member
    tzeshan said:
    This is one of the Apple superior technologies competitors try to steal with the help of the reporter paying a bounty.
    Excuse me? You have some proof or strong indications of this or are you just a student of alternative facts and fake news?
  • Reply 22 of 26
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 599member
    Hopefully the employee who violated an NDA to sell these is swiftly punished. 
    I read the article a second time after reading your comment and I can't seem to find a single thing to indicate a device was sold. Obviously, pictures of the device were shared and that may violate a NDA, but there is no claim at all that a machine was sold.
  • Reply 23 of 26
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Going all the way back to the early Jobs era:   A closed system was a way of insuring quality by blocking tinkering...   It still is and a closed repair system does the same:  it insures consistent, managed quality throughout the product.

    There is a group that want to open up those systems.   I find it highly doubtful that they are interested in improving the customer's experience.  Rather, they are looking for a way to profit off of the Apple community.
  • Reply 24 of 26
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Hopefully the employee who violated an NDA to sell these is swiftly punished. 
    Yes. Might Apple be able to determine who was in a repair area using an iPhone to take a photo based on wifi and iCloud info? If not that, then surely this area in the Apple Store is under security surveillance?
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 25 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,490member
    Going all the way back to the early Jobs era:   A closed system was a way of insuring quality by blocking tinkering...   It still is and a closed repair system does the same:  it insures consistent, managed quality throughout the product.

    There is a group that want to open up those systems.   I find it highly doubtful that they are interested in improving the customer's experience.  Rather, they are looking for a way to profit off of the Apple community.
    I'm not sure there is a problem here.

    In  the early Jobs era most of the world had to rely on Apple authorised repair centres which had access to tools, parts and service manuals. They were often located in the bigger catchment areas which left users in rural areas underserved. Even in the big cities the shops themselves were in places with poor foot traffic. The quality or the repairs sometimes left a lot to be desired and there were cases of tampering with equipment sent in for repair.

    The case against tinkering is not very strong in that context and much less now when component level repair is far cheaper and widespread than ever before.

    There is an utterly huge amount of iMacs out there with shot graphics cards. All heat related deaths on otherwise perfect machines.

    I have a late 2009 iMac with a shot graphics card that Apple officially says cannot be repaired. I can source the card internationally (new or second hand) but Apple can't officially repair this machine as it is 'obsolete'.

    Prices for these cards are mostly over 300€. I have a very expensive, perfectly good machine (save that card) that Apple wants me to retire for a problem that has its roots in the design of the machine. They are thermally challenged, even while mostly using laptop class components.

    Take a look around the internet and you will see plenty of these cases.

    If Apple truly cared about the environment it could perform component level repair as a service. It has robots designed to disassemble equipment (phones) and could easily programme a machine to identify component faults on graphics cards and motherboards, which is exactly what these companies do anyway (by means of x-ray or microscope).

    If It chooses not to, then it would be nice if it established a network of certified repair shops to handle out of warranty repairs for which the idea of 'tinkering' has no impact at all. It is a repair center/client arrangement that would benefit from Apple's indirect participation.

    On top of that, it would be even better if the machines themselves were designed with repair in mind. Something that Apple does not want to do at any cost. I have heard about a lot of new MBPs failing (or not passing diagnostics) and the only solution was to ship the machine back to Apple and have the shop order a new one. That might be a solution under warranty, but out of warranty it will be a tougher job.
    edited March 2017
  • Reply 26 of 26
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    avon b7 said:
    Going all the way back to the early Jobs era:   A closed system was a way of insuring quality by blocking tinkering...   It still is and a closed repair system does the same:  it insures consistent, managed quality throughout the product.

    There is a group that want to open up those systems.   I find it highly doubtful that they are interested in improving the customer's experience.  Rather, they are looking for a way to profit off of the Apple community.
    I'm not sure there is a problem here.

    In  the early Jobs era most of the world had to rely on Apple authorised repair centres which had access to tools, parts and service manuals. They were often located in the bigger catchment areas which left users in rural areas underserved. Even in the big cities the shops themselves were in places with poor foot traffic. The quality or the repairs sometimes left a lot to be desired and there were cases of tampering with equipment sent in for repair.

    The case against tinkering is not very strong in that context and much less now when component level repair is far cheaper and widespread than ever before.

    There is an utterly huge amount of iMacs out there with shot graphics cards. All heat related deaths on otherwise perfect machines.

    I have a late 2009 iMac with a shot graphics card that Apple officially says cannot be repaired. I can source the card internationally (new or second hand) but Apple can't officially repair this machine as it is 'obsolete'.

    Prices for these cards are mostly over 300€. I have a very expensive, perfectly good machine (save that card) that Apple wants me to retire for a problem that has its roots in the design of the machine. They are thermally challenged, even while mostly using laptop class components.

    Take a look around the internet and you will see plenty of these cases.

    If Apple truly cared about the environment it could perform component level repair as a service. It has robots designed to disassemble equipment (phones) and could easily programme a machine to identify component faults on graphics cards and motherboards, which is exactly what these companies do anyway (by means of x-ray or microscope).

    If It chooses not to, then it would be nice if it established a network of certified repair shops to handle out of warranty repairs for which the idea of 'tinkering' has no impact at all. It is a repair center/client arrangement that would benefit from Apple's indirect participation.

    On top of that, it would be even better if the machines themselves were designed with repair in mind. Something that Apple does not want to do at any cost. I have heard about a lot of new MBPs failing (or not passing diagnostics) and the only solution was to ship the machine back to Apple and have the shop order a new one. That might be a solution under warranty, but out of warranty it will be a tougher job.
    You miss the point:   Jobs instilled into Apple a closed and controlled environment in all aspects -- not just repairs.   You can't run other OS's on Apple hardware and you can't run Apple OS's on other vendor's hardware.   There are many, many more examples.  (And yes, there are exceptions such as jail broken IPhones, etc -- but those exceptions prove the rule).  

    In many ways, it IS the fundamental difference between Apple and the Microsoft/HP consortium:  Not simply in the closed vs open systems as such but in what open systems enable vs what closed systems enable.   Open systems enable flexibility while closed systems enable higher levels of security and stability and, due to the integration, are better able to exploit the technical aspects of both the hardware and the software.  But both have their advantages and disadvantages.  Neither is superior to the other.

    But, you cannot expect to impose an open system (or repair process) on closed systems and expect to continue to reap their benefits.

    I would suggest that if you live in a rural area and are not willing to send in your broken Apple hardware, that you buy HP next time.  From what you say, those products meet your needs better.  
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